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  1. #31
    Seajet's Avatar
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    SAWDOC,

    I don't know what you're on about and I doubt you do either re. squabbles, none here.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAWDOC View Post
    No squabbles please
    Hey?? He was not contesting another's opinion with a quote. He made a valid point which ties in with TB's earlier post about the danger of a false sense of security engendered by safety equipment.

  3. #33
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    .
    Not wearing a lifejacket because you might still die anyway is like not wearing a seatbelt or m/cycle helmet for the same reason. Illogical.

    Dinghy trips in cold water are (relatively) dangerous. Fewer people would die if everyone wore l/js. Hard to see how anyone can argue against that, or why they want to / feel the need to.

    - W

  4. #34
    gunman is offline Registered User
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    You could look at it as a Lifejacket would just delay the inevitable or you could look at it as it may give a time window in which to be rescued. However small that window may be I'd prefer to have a small chance than no chance.

    I don't want to take anything away from the purpose of this topic, this was a tragic loss. My comments are not aout this particular incident, I am just surprised at opinion on the subject of lifejackets and tenders.

  5. #35
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    I never said or intended anyone to pervert my message into 'don't wear a lifejacket as you'll die anyway', of course one should wear one.

    I was pointing out that it may not have been the instant cure people are assuming, in this tragic case at Studland.

    As well as a lifejacket a hand flare, torch, waterproof handheld vhf, anything to get attention is also required.

    Climbing into an inflatable from the water fully clothed is nigh on impossile, and rigid tenders can't be righted in the same way as sailing dinghies.

    As the crew and relatives of the poor bloke may well read this, I rather think some respect should be shown rather than insulting comments about people not wearing lj's.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    I've been at Studland riding out gales etc several times.

    I feel strongly that something is being missed here; when at anchor there in big winds, ( and yes to Old Harrys' point, the wind does funnel down viciously ) there's usually a line of white water to leeward where shelter ends and there are the strong tides of Poole entrance channel followed quickly by the whole of Poole Bay out to the Needles.

    Even if this poor bloke had been wearing a lifejacket and his dinghy flipped, he'd be drifting smartly out into the dark and all I describe above; the LJ would merely delay things unless he could get help.
    He may also have had a heart attack, stroke or fit.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croak View Post
    He may also have had a heart attack, stroke or fit.
    Another good reason to wear a lifejacket.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogWatch View Post
    Another good reason to wear a lifejacket.
    Well it's a good start wearing a lifejacket, but if suffering a heart attack / stroke / fit while floating out into the dark in a very rough huge bay, I still suggest a means of attracting attention is also essential if one can manage it.

    A torch is always handy and I always carry a small led job ashore or afloat, but for Mayday situations like this I suggest a day /night hand flare or much better a waterproof handheld VHF would be the real life saver.

    Also I'd suggest if one gets the dinghy inverted it should be utmost priority Plan A to swim sideways to the current / wind and get to an anchored boat if at all possible and get help, the difficult decision would be to leave an inverted dinghy to it but it's essential to do so if there's help in sight...

    In the case of this desperately unlucky skipper at Studland he was not doing anything other than we've all done, including the most vociferous lifejacket proponents.

    In my and most cases I'd suggest we can't leave flares on our tenders, and in such a situation it woud be pure luck if someone saw a flare anyway.

    I still don't understand why mobile phones aren't waterproof except very expensive models, so the current answer seems to be a waterproof handheld VHF on a lanyard to the tender operators' lifejacket; a torch is always handy too, I carry a small LED one 24/7 and recommend it.

    There was a case a year or two ago of a speedboat which broke down off the South coast, they shone their lighted mobile phones to the shore and someone spotted them, then had the brains to call the coastguard; a remarkably lucky escape for them compared to the subject of this thread who was no doubt an experienced sailor.
    Last edited by Seajet; 14-05-12 at 03:40.

  9. #39
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    It has taken a long time (and this thread) to make me see sense. My wife (a non-swimmer) always wears a LJ in the tender. I seldom do. Only if it is very rough or I am working with the mooring. Indeed my LJ is (like those of many others) in the locker aboard Wight Dawn which is on its swinging mooring.

    But, I am reminded by this sad thread of a year (1971 I think) in which 12 people died afloat in the Clyde area. At the time, I argued against these sad events as a justification for regular wearing of LJs. My analysis of the twelve cases "supported" this view. Four people drowned from a tender one wild night in September, but I was in my tender with three other people and survived. So I had a better tender, or was a better oarsman (or most likely just lucky.) Another fell in the Crinan canal. Drink was a factor here, but that also only affects others. I can hold mine, can't I? A fellow member of RGYC died of a heart attack sailing his YW Dayboat alone. Well he would have wanted to go that way, wouldn't we all? There were other "falling into water from the dock" incidents and one man-overboard. Been there, done that and survived.

    If there is still anybody that believes that cr4p and thinks that way then I hope then survive as long as I have. But the next time I go afloat, I will be wearing an old Quadrant buoyancy aid that is in the house. And my real LJ will be coming back ashore with me. I am joining my wife in wearing my LJ in the tender. Well most of the time anyway.
    Ken

  10. #40
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    If more people wear lifejackets in the tender, hopefully together with a real means of attracting attention if things go pear shaped, the sad death of this skipper will not be in vain, I hope this may be a small comfort to his family and crew...

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