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  1. #1
    dod's Avatar
    dod is offline Registered User
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    Default no books! gen enquiry! re mouldy food

    As this happens quite often on this boat I would please like to know if anyone else suffers from eating mouldy food? Not just once a year but on a regular weekly basis when produce seems to be over the 'fresh' stage.
    I am beginning to think there is a storage prob or perhaps the need to visit land more than once every 2 weeks. (penicillin you say) (yuuucccchhh I say)

  2. #2
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    The key thing is to buy things that haven't been chilled or washed. Such produce is freely available in the Canaries as long as you stay away from supermarkets and go to the central fresh market. Order everything from one stall (check them out first), they usually take orders and deliver to the boat.

    Also some things keep well, others don't whatever you do.
    e.g. apples, oranges, potatoes, white cabbage keep well.
    Leeks and green peppers don't.

    Store everything in plastic baskets that allow air to circulate. Check every few days for anything going off and eat it or chuck it.

    Buy a mix of ripe and (mainly) unripe fruit. Keep citrus fruits separate from everything. Also keep bananas separate. They both affect other things ripening.

    Everybody says turn the eggs over occasionally but there's no need, the boat's motion shakes them up nicely. The other old wives tale is to wash everything before storing - DON'T. If the potatoes have mud on them leave it but make sure everything is dry.
    I may be wrong but not always

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sailorman View Post
    The key thing is to buy things that haven't been chilled or washed........make sure everything is dry.
    Absolutely agree, dry, non-chilled fresh veg and fruit last much longer than others. Get rid of any plastic as soon as possible.

  4. #4
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    I was told not to put potatoes together with onions - so I didn't.

    Agree with the rest of the advice.

  5. #5
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    Storing onions and fruit in net bags helps loads. Keep bananas away from all over fruit and veg or it will go over too fast.

    We've never washed our stuff before a long passage -was it before use though. Seriously don't buy refrigerated veg or any that's had cold water sprayed over it to keep it looking fresh.
    Drinking rum and playing music with my friends.

  6. #6
    lenseman's Avatar
    lenseman is offline Registered User
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    Once you see fresh fruit with mould, remove and wash all the fruit in a mild detergent to kill the spoors.

    If it is bread with mould, pull off the mouldy parts and convert the bread to toast and eat as soon as possible.
    regards David - DSW Marine Engineering
    www.dswmarineengineering.com

  7. #7
    dod's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks all will heed all that good advice in future.

  8. #8
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    Yotties are so tight

    I've only thrown three mouldy bread crusts, 500g of diced pork and two potatoes in the last year

    PS I think waste destroys the world so I monitor my waste food
    I'm more Teddybear than Werebear
    Beware the Grizzlybear

  9. #9
    tcm is offline Registered User
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    the most surprisingly-disgusting smell is rotting spuds. Agree with info here. I believe it is ethylene gas produced by bananas

  10. #10
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    As a one-off customer in a third-world market, you are always in line for the dodgiest produce. Then a week or two knocking around in the boat doesn't help any. One of the hidden benefits of the cruising life is building up a considerable immunity to mould toxins.

    I rate a pressure cooker - nothing else compares for rendering the inedible, edible.

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