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  1. #21
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleSister View Post
    Like an earlier poster, a friend has a Macwester Wight. (I am not clear how different that is to a Seaforth.) He is VERY happy with it.

    It is certainly very comfy and spacious inside compared to some of its competitors. Performance isn't this friend's thing, but he does do a lot of sailing in it.

    I believe that with the previous owners it cruised the Med for some years, before being sailed back. So clearly it's a very practical boat, that gets a lot more use than many, how shall I say, esteemed craft of a more performance oriented bent.
    For info' there are several Anderson 22's in the Med', one just came back to the UK and another is on her way sailing back sometime; others live in places from Germany and Austria to Norway, while one is off to live in Africa.

    Being a lump of a boat like a Macwester makes for an unenjoyable liability, unable to reach port before bad weather and a sitting duck when in it.

    I didn't mean this to become a Macwester / A22 argument as Nicholas123 is trying, that would be shooting fish in a barrel ! Merely to mention what I know of the Macwesters.
    Last edited by Seajet; 11-12-12 at 23:12.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    Being a lump of a boat like a Macwester makes for an unenjoyable liability, unable to reach port before bad weather and a sitting duck when in it.
    Nonsense! My friend gets enormous pleasure (and practical sailing) from his, and no doubt many others do, too.

    You are undermining the credibility of your case by overstating it. Different people look for different things in their boats. Just because a boat wouldn't be your choice doesn't mean it is either unenjoyable or unsafe.

    Neither a Macwester nor an Anderson 22 (nor many other classes) would be my first choice of boat, but I admire both of them for their particular qualities, wouldn't rule out owning either of them if push came to shove, and I'm sure both could give me a great deal of pleasure.

    By the way, not all Macwesters are equally 'lumpen'. IIRC some later bilge keel models were tank tested and had deeper keels, so that, for instance, one or other of the 26 or 27 (can't remember which way round) had better sailing performance than the other. Of course neither were, or intended to be, a performance flyer, and both were very spacious, comfy and solid compared to their more performance orientated contemporaries.

    As I've said, I don't know the particular merits and demerits of the Seaforth model, or what the OP's mate is particularly looking for, but think he or she should ignore those who suggest that no Macwester could possibly be enjoyable, practical or safe.

  3. #23
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    Sep 2010
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    Little Sister,

    I stand by the gist of what I was saying, but agree I was overstating things a little in an attempt to make my point; each to their own.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  4. #24
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    Aug 2011
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    Maybe in a boat next to you?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    Being a lump of a boat like a Macwester makes for an unenjoyable liability,
    Complete rot.My Mac 27 sails well is practical down to earth & built like a ship rather than a toy or shall we say yacht?
    Just look at that seaforth & everything about it oozes practicality.That is one impressive boat in my opinion.
    Not everyone wants to zoom from A to B & then sit in something about as charmless as a rabbit hutch seajet.

  5. #25
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas123 View Post
    Complete rot.My Mac 27 sails well is practical down to earth & built like a ship rather than a toy or shall we say yacht?
    Just look at that seaforth & everything about it oozes practicality.That is one impressive boat in my opinion.
    Not everyone wants to zoom from A to B & then sit in something about as charmless as a rabbit hutch seajet.
    Haven't been in an Anderson even at rest, have you Nicholas ?!

    I zot around in an enjoyable way, and my boat has quite a charming interior thanks.

    I didn't introduce the comparison, you did; the Macwester has enough problems already !

    Seajet out.
    Last edited by Seajet; 12-12-12 at 15:59.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  6. #26
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    Nov 2011
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    Boat in Milford Haven
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    he was astounded by our rudder authority when we ghosted alongside at less than 1 knot
    maybe, but retaining decent steerage at low speeds surely isn't an uncommon asset. The macswester may not do it but loads of boats beside Andersons surely do. You can't have looked exceptional to this chap, unless the incident in question occurred thirty years ago.

  7. #27
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitbaltic View Post
    maybe, but retaining decent steerage at low speeds surely isn't an uncommon asset. The macswester may not do it but loads of boats beside Andersons surely do. You can't have looked exceptional to this chap, unless the incident in question occurred thirty years ago.
    Surprisingly uncommon, and 20 or so years ago; have a look at the big thick skegs in front of the rudders of the M word boats in question, key words being 'blanketting' and 'stall'.

    Please let's refer to whatever assets Macwesters may have, I'm sure there must be something beyond declaring ' max weight layup ! " when playing Top Trumps cards.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  8. #28
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    Nov 2011
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    Boat in Milford Haven
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    Surprisingly uncommon, and 20 or so years ago; have a look at the big thick skegs in front of the rudders of the M word boats in question
    Sure, that's what I mean, uncommon 20 or more years ago given the designs of the day. Not uncommon now surely. My Hanse keeps her steerage down to absolutely nothing on the log provided the wind isn't enough to catch her topsides. Of course she has a spade and shoal draft wing, so very different to a macwester, but not so different to your lift keel and transom rudder. As this is the rough plan of the AWB I guess plenty of modern boats will behave this way although I admit wetted area drag on the beamy designs might not help (the Hanse 301 is anything but beamy).

    Anyway am in agreement about keeping the thread on macwesters.

    Cheers

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    157

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    They are "motor boats" with sails.
    I sailed on for many years. it was home finished, but it was an amazing boat.
    The wind gets up and she comes alive. Feels powerful, and so safe.
    Flaws, the bilge keels have steel shot in them with concrete. This rusts, I think when bilge water gets in. The bottoms of the GRP keels wear and the rusty shot will crack/split the keel.

    Like a Westerly, but less refined in terms of finish. Check out Yachting Monthly, the article by the guy who ran his Malin up on a rock in Turkey, did no significant damage - good boat, in that respect!

  10. #30
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    Oct 2002
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    Plymouth
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    Looks a great boat to me:

    http://www.clippermarine.co.uk/clipp...mentID=3745249

    Ideal for the Continental canals. Short spars to stow on deck, leave the mizzen at home if you like, shallow draught. Excellent deep cockpit, easily fully enclosed for winter motoring, fine, deep, C shaped dinette, roomy heads plus aft cabin. Looks good with davits and can handle a fair sized tender back there - maybe an Anderson 22?

    There will not be much one design racing on offer but horses for courses. Not sure I would want to pay 35 grand for one, but 7 - 10 thousand could be a winner.

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