Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,379

    Default Channel / North Sea Navigation

    Along with a few others, we will be taking Resolution this year on a big outing from the Hamble to the Baltic via the Kiel canal. Starting the passage planning, I am getting apprehensive about navigation in the narrow bits of the Channel and into the North Sea. Seem like lots of sandbanks, traffic and forests of windfarms. All a bit daunting for someone who has never ventured East of Eastbourne!
    We will be four fairly experienced old codgers on board and don't want to hang about to much on the way to Kiel. The boat is a comfortable 42 footer. We have AIS and radar (but have seldom ever used the latter and are not practiced with it.) The initial thinking is to get down to Dover, put in for a rest and be ready to catch the best tide onwards. What should we do then?
    What routing?
    Tide timings?
    Best charts to get?

    Any advice welcomed.
    Peter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    1,324

    Default

    Three main options: cross towards Cap Griz Nez and follow the coast NE-wards, cross the shipping lanes some 10 miles further to the N, then zig-zag across and around the Flemish Banks toward the Belgian coast, both daylight trips or thirdly, head north quite a bit further and cross the shipping lanes straight for the Dutch coast, a longer trip.

    Coast-hopping along the Belgian and Dutch coasts, you will not be bothered by wind farms, Much will depend on the length of the trips you want to make. As far as the Frisian islands, all can be divided into easy daysails, from the Frisian Islands to the Kiel Canal is best done in one go, about 36 hours, so not too bad

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    16,637

    Default

    An alternative, which might be dictated by weather or other factors, would be to go from Dover up to Lowestoft (or maybe Harwich) and across from there to Ijmuiden or Den Helder or carry on. This misses the wind farms and can be done as day sails, almost. There is plenty to see and do in the Frisians, but you would probably want to save this for your return, when adverse winds are more likely.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,025

    Smile

    We kept a boat in Dover for over a decade, I would suggest a route (this is not my preferred route for lots of practical reasons but it gives you a quick stop off in Calais if you get jittery) from Dover to Dunkirk, leave Dover via western entrance, then leave the Varne to starboard and cross the TSS to ZC2 and follow the coast line to Dunkirk but watch out for sandbanks on the French side. You will encounter ferries from Dover to Calais and Dover to Dunkirk along with all the other traffic.

    Preferred route

    Cross (most of) the ferry traffic at the eastern entrance to Dover port i.e. leave Dover by the eastern entrance, then make for the Sangetty light buoy on the south side of the Goodwin sands, (keep out of the TSS) from there cross the TSS via the MPC and follow the buoyed channel to Dunkirk east, watch out for ferry traffic entering and leaving Dunkirk west. Check your chart for wrecks outside Dunkirk east.

    As usual pick a favourable tide keep a good lookout, you could do the trip in 6 hours.

    Edit, Be aware that the DIRECTION of the water flow changes from west to east 2 hours before HW Dover, leave Dover around 2.5 hours before HW just in case Port Control Delay your departure.
    Last edited by Marsupial; 19-01-13 at 14:30.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    N Kent Coast
    Posts
    3,935

    Default

    If you don't want to take too long to get to the Baltic, and have decent weather, I would go for Den Helder, with Ijmuiden as a stop if you want a break. Crossing over to France before Dunkirk means following up the channels which you could do without if you want to get some miles under the keel. So long as you are sensible the traffic is not such a big issue, especially with radar and AIS to fall back on if the visibility deteriorates.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    location location ...
    Posts
    862

    Default

    Ramsgate to Den Helder gives you a route running about 5 miles N of the main shipping lanes, which is quite useful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lorient
    Posts
    3,781

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joker View Post
    Ramsgate to Den Helder gives you a route running about 5 miles N of the main shipping lanes, which is quite useful.
    That's right. I've just clicked on yr blog..nice one,bookmarked looking forward to reading it,Jerry (I've been up there before and intend again)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Mersea. north Essex
    Posts
    3,906

    Default

    Also Ramsgate to Lowestoft keeps you outside the Thames estuary sandbanks and most of the windfarms
    davidej

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    1,768

    Default

    I did Dover to Kiel in a 43'er. Owner only wanted day hops so did: Dover/Zeebrugge; Zeebrugge/Ijmuiden ( or Scheveningen); Ijmuiden/Den Helder; Den Helder/Nordeney; Nordeney/Brunsbuttel; Brunsbuttel/Kiel.
    Some long days but doable with two of us clogging along in a boat that size. Nav was straightforward up the channels between the banks using a plotter.
    Ramsgate/den Helder sounds a good option. Lowestoft/Ijmuiden is the standard commute for lots of Dutch and shorter of course.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    16,637

    Default

    As you can see, there are several options. I would be prepared to keep an open mind until I had to decide, say, at Dover. Coming from the East Coast, I have done most of the proposed trip a number of times, including non-stop three times. In half-decent weather, the second part, along the Dutch/German Frisians is pretty quiet, with next to no ship traffic and usually flat seas in the inshore channel that you will follow.

    You have to buck the tide some of the way whatever you do, but all that matters is arriving at the mouth of the Elbe at the change of tide. This is remarkably undifficult but a lot of people seem to get it wrong and end up against a 4 knot current. You can take a break fairly easily at Norderney, or even Helgoland, though you will need to keep clear of a traffic rotary scheme nearby (or face stiff penalties).

    BTW, the Dutch chart packs 1811 & 1812 are more or less indispensible between Den Helder and Norderney, where you are most likely to be seeking shelter.
    Last edited by johnalison; 19-01-13 at 22:50.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Find Boats For Sale

to
to