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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    645

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    Yes of course maintenance is going to be ongoing and something I haven't considered lightly. She'll hopefully be my home for the next couple of decades of my life so I'm happy to see this as a commitment which is worthwhile.

    I'm not intending to permanently cruise around on her at this stage so yes, she'll be a great house boat, and she is more than capable of going to sea to get her down to where I want to keep her permanently.She's a boat, a massively built boat. It's a delivery trip, which will be very well prepared for and lots of trials before we set off. I'm not particularly looking forward to the manoeuvring, but what's the point in only doing things which are nice and easy? Visibility is being given consideration to, potentially mirrors/cameras, lots of crew on hand, etc.

    She's had a good survey (and is now comprehensively insured) in which we looked at the garboard and everything else that needs considering for the trip, which has given me a great base to work from in our preparations.

    It's a bit like what my dad said - he'd never have bought her himself, too scared! But in the same sentence he was telling me this, he said I had no choice but to go for it - I'm young and a project like this is just what I need, what a great adventure, and we can all work on her together. It's only been a week of ownership so far, but it's probably been the best week of my life.

    Of course things are likely to go wrong, don't think I've ever been to sea when we haven't had to use our initiative to solve something and that's the fun of it all. Do the best preparation and sea trials as we can, kit the boat out, then take it easy in lots of legs if we have to to get good weather windows. Lots of friends to help out on the trip down, most of whom are professional sailors themselves, some on similarly large wooden ships!

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    32,592

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    Quote Originally Posted by clyst View Post
    As a house boat it's ideal as a cruising boat it's a nightmare
    Chris, had he bought her, had something approaching houseboatism in mind. He wanted her to remain mobile, and thought perhaps he might chug somewhere else a couple of times a year by way of a holiday, but otherwise he was going to be based more or less permanently on the Itchen.

    I know Ellie lives on her current boat, so perhaps her plans are similar?

    Quote Originally Posted by clyst View Post
    look at the visibility,small wheelhouse windows,no rear vision and only limited side vision close quarter manoevering will be a nightmare.
    Well, she looks like a little ship, so perhaps the thing to do is treat her that way? Berthing William and Stavros, the captain used to climb onto the chartroom roof for a good all-round view, and call manoeuvring orders down to the bridge - rudder orders to the helmsman and engine / thruster orders to the engineer. No thought required from either of them (good, cos the first time I ever experienced arrival in those ships I was the helmsman!), just like having a voice-controlled autopilot.

    Pete

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    25,836

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    The voice controlled autopilot is spiffing as long as one has a trustworthy crew spare to do it !

    I once skippered a 54' twin screw heavy wooden motorsailor, I had visions of Jack Hawkins as I ordered ' slow ahead port, slow astern starboard ' etc getting into a tight berth...

    I'm glad to hear JellyEllie has lots of proficient crew for the delivery trip, all I can suggest is to take plenty of buckets and cameras, in that order of priority !

    Have Fun JellyEllie.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association www.anderson22class.co.uk

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    5,026

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    She looks like a great little ship - takes me back to my own youth, when my Dad hankered after an MFV conversion - to the extent of looking at many MFVs with a view to conversion. Some still smelt of fish! I do recall one wonderful part conversion with an engine room you could walk around with no less than three diesels in it - a main engine with cylinders a foot across (maybe I exaggerate - but not by much!) and two wing engines. It never happened - it would never have been practical for us to do the conversion, and I think that Dad realised that the upkeep of such a vessel would be too much for us.

    The boats we were looking at, in the late 60s, were probably much the same vintage as Elizmore. Most of them were end-of-life for fishing; that's why they were available for conversion. Some of the conversions were very good; others showed cheap wood and poor design and construction. But you have to remember that a commercial vessel is built for a price, a purpose and with a definite life-span in mind. A commercial vessel has to earn back it's cost over a specified period, and make a profit doing so. So, commercial vessels are often built using techniques that will last for the expected commercial life, but not necessarily much longer - for example, iron fastenings instead of copper. And during their commercial life, they will have been worked hard, without regard to preserving the boat for another generation. Repairs will have been done to a "good enough" standard, not to a "good as new" standard. They aren't like boats built for leisure, where a more-or-less indefinite lifespan is envisaged. So, I'd be worried about things like fastenings starting to fail, and being faced with a massive project to refasten the boat - because once one fastening goes, it shows they are probably all about to go!

    You've got a good survey, and I'm sure the surveyor will have found all the immediate concerns. But you need to keep a weather eye open for trouble so that you can get on top of it as soon as it appears. Good luck!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Liverpool - boat Ardfern
    Posts
    2,081

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    Oh to be young enough to take on such a project. I can imagine just how exciting life is for you with Elizmor in it. Hope you have many happy times onboard her.
    As regards close manouvering it would be great to bark commands down a voice tube to the helm. You may also be able to rig up some type of remote joystick steering - after all she is a ship !
    My permanently unfinished web site www.8thday.co.uk

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    'ang on a mo, I'll just take some bearings
    Posts
    27,563

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    Well done JE. You'll have some great experiences, an interesting home and stories to tell!

    Gofrit!
    Next time, it'll all be different.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1

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    Hello Eleanor, so glad to see that progress is being made with Elizmor - I guess you are back in Brighton now? I hope your friend PRV doesn't think it was us who turned him back from viewing the boat - that must have been Mick Woods about a year ago. Looking forward to more posts, all the very best to you all, Polly x

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    645

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    Hi Polly! I am up on Elizmor - I have just sent you an email

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    32,592

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    Quote Originally Posted by PollyM View Post
    I hope your friend PRV doesn't think it was us who turned him back from viewing the boat - that must have been Mick Woods about a year ago.
    No worries, it would indeed have been about a year ago and the name Mick rings a bell. To be clear, it wasn't me wanting to buy the boat but my friend Chris; he roped me in to look round as a second critical pair of eyes and spot things that his boat-love-struck gaze might have passed over

    I'll admit I still wish he'd managed to buy her, but best of luck to Ellie anyway

    Pete

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    645

    Default

    My first restless night aboard - now she really feels like my boat!

    It was pretty gusty at midnight and kept me awake as I'm not used to all of her noises yet. It's actually quite good fun lying in bed trying to work out what all the noises were. My dad got up to turn the wind genny off as it kept braking itself and making massive clunking noises which vibrated through the whole boat, then me and Jonny realised we'd left the cover off the foredeck and it was flapping around. The forecast was set to get worse by 5am so we hauled ourselves out of bed into the bitterly cold wind and rain to tie the foredeck cover back down. Back aboard, there was nothing better than warming up by the roaring Rayburn fire and then diving back into bed under my new feather & down duvet! Ah the little things!

    Yesterday was a productive day; completed the first full coat of antifoul on the hull, took the masking tape off, new boot top looks great but I doubt she'll actually sit on it! (We followed an old line.) She looks like a proper boat now with antifoul and boot top, a couple of guys in the yard complimented her ship-like looks.

    The replacement paddlewheel for the Nasa log impeller arrived and dad showed me how to fit it. The previous owners said the log didn't work/wasn't connected up, but the transducer connection does run back to the instruments in the wheelhouse, so we were hoping it would work with a new paddlewheel. It didn't, but dad went up and fiddled around with the instruments in the wheelhouse, and managed to get it all working - the depth and log instruments had been plugged into each other's connections! Swapped them around and they work fine. Just need a new bracket to mount them again - ordered some perforated metal strips off the internet.

    Last night Jonny cooked an amazing roast on the Rayburn - it was the first time we managed to get it up to the 'HOT' temperature, and it was roaring! We have just used the normal gas cooker in the upstairs kitchen for cooking so far, so we thought we'd try the Rayburn out for its intended purpose. The first roast cooked aboard Elizmor was a great success.

    Right! Best get on with things - hopefully a few more things will arrive in the post today that we need to get on with a few jobs.

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