Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,739

    Default Re: Rival Bowman call in administrators

    It does make me laugh all this traditional/die hard British industry stuff. Having wondered around these B. boards for a while now it is clear that there is the weirdest form of snobbery about non-british built boats (Swedish boats in this context are honourary British). The three largest (dare I say most successful?) operators (Bavaria, Jeanneau and Beneteau) get melded together as if they are the same boats (they are most definitely not) and given a 'put down' label of Ben/Jen/Bav. This is then followed by lots of nonsense about prefering to be caught in a blow in a Westerly, HR etc etc. Hundreds of these modern (euro) production boats have sailed the Atlantic - they are not flimsy big dinghies. Westerly went bust, suffered from osmosis problems due to poor production techniques. Can you imagine the schadenfreude of the brit brigade if the production boats suffered in the same way, to the same degree! Others have followed - not just boat builders but equipment suppliers and yards. For the workers of course, it is very sad. Having been a mere punter looking to buy (and probably prefering to buy British) I was really put off by the off-hand approach of many firms I met at shows. And the workmanship I saw was at best passable.

    Let me come clean. This year I bought a new Bavaria 40. Yes, It was a compromise - any choice is. But I wanted to sail leisurely with my family as well as longer offshore trips with friends. The comfort and space of the Bavaria was in a different league and my family far preferred it. Yet it does sail very well too. All the deck gear is based on top notch brands and it has the kind of design in it that comes from modern volume production learning. For example, the wiring is first rate, not a taped-down afterthought. Yes, its true (shock horror) the cushions are velcro backed. I what will I do when these wear out? Why, I'll buy new Velcro strips for 50p.

    The customer service before and after delivery has been very responsive. Six months on, I know I made the right choice. And six years on? I don't know and I don't care frankly.

    The loss of established businesses is always sad. But the hard rule of business is that the customer is always king.








  2. #12
    Guest

    Default Re: Rival Bowman call in administrators

    You say:

    "This is then followed by lots of nonsense about prefering to be caught in a blow in a Westerly, HR etc etc."

    "I bought a new Bavaria 40. Yes, It was a compromise - any choice is. But I wanted to sail leisurely with my family as well as longer offshore trips with friends."

    Well which is it: a lot of nonsense about preferring to be caught in [a heavier design of boat] in a blow, or is the Bavaria a "compromise" more suitable than the other designs for sailing with family and friends???

    Personally I would prefer to be in a heavier/longer keeled/less beamy design in a blow, but would not by any means regard the Bavaria as a death trap.

    Also you say: "Hundreds of these modern (euro) production boats have sailed the Atlantic - they are not flimsy big dinghies".

    Bear in mind that even small flimsy dinghies have sailed the Atlantic. And there is not necessarily anything magic about a boat crossing the Atlantic, especially via the trade winds route. Sometimes sailing in the Channel can be a more stringent test.


  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,739

    Default Re: Rival Bowman call in administrators

    At the risk of getting into a debate about semantics, a compromise cannot be a choice between one thing or the other. If I opted for the more traditional heavier boat, I would have compromised speed, space, comfort, customer care and price. If I opted for the modern production, I would have compromised the length/disp ratio of a more traditional design which might (I would agree) have better all-weather capability. However, the cost would have meant that I would be forced to select a smaller model - getting me into bigger issues about shorter but heavier against longer but lighter.

    Extremes apart, with a modest crew, there can be little doubt (cf Heavy Weather Sailing) that heavier displacement affords greater protection than lighter boats which generally need helming through a blow. So I wanted a boat for leisurely weerkend pottering with the family, accepting that I would probably need a different, fitter crew for offshore passages.

    The real point I was making was that the brand name alone doesn't make it safe. Perhaps I should have said that I would prefer to be in a Bav 40 in a blow than a Westerly Pentland. But maybe this comment is likely to cause a storm of its own!!!


  4. #14
    Guest

    Default I wouldn\'t disagree with that NT

    NT


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •