View Poll Results: How do you stow your main?

Voters
195. You may not vote on this poll
  • Stackpack

    102 52.31%
  • Lazyjacks

    36 18.46%
  • Flake down by hand

    38 19.49%
  • In-mast or -boom furling

    15 7.69%
  • Other

    4 2.05%
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Results 21 to 30 of 50
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Live in Kent, boat in Canary Islands
    Posts
    16,246

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by A1GSS View Post
    Lazyjacks. A sort of cats cradle of lines either side of the mast ...
    Stackpack. Bag around the boom ... Zip closure. Never seen one without lazyjacks ...
    Thank you, I therefore have a stackpack held up by lazyjacks. I know the latter, but just called the stackpack a sail cover.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
    Posts
    7,288

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    I don't have lazyjacks, but often wonder about them, especially as I'm often single handing. Despite the numerous adverse comments on here (e.g catching battens, noise) I'd like to give it a try sometime (might try a temporary arrangment from the signal halliard blocks on the spreaders).

    At 23ft LOA the main is not very big, but it's still requires a bit of dancing around on the coachroof, usually when there's limited clear water and other boats milling about that need my attention.

    I'm interested in the idea of being able to tie the lazyjacks forward. Does that necessarily mean having an extra cleat on the mast, and a line going up to the spreaders or wherever the lazyjacks are suspended from that can be released and extended? Or is there some other cunning arrangement?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    19,519

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleSister View Post
    I don't have lazyjacks, but often wonder about them, especially as I'm often single handing. Despite the numerous adverse comments on here (e.g catching battens, noise) I'd like to give it a try sometime (might try a temporary arrangment from the signal halliard blocks on the spreaders).

    At 23ft LOA the main is not very big, but it's still requires a bit of dancing around on the coachroof, usually when there's limited clear water and other boats milling about that need my attention.

    I'm interested in the idea of being able to tie the lazyjacks forward. Does that necessarily mean having an extra cleat on the mast, and a line going up to the spreaders or wherever the lazyjacks are suspended from that can be released and extended? Or is there some other cunning arrangement?
    That's the arrangement I have

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleSister View Post
    I

    I'm interested in the idea of being able to tie the lazyjacks forward. Does that necessarily mean having an extra cleat on the mast, and a line going up to the spreaders or wherever the lazyjacks are suspended from that can be released and extended? Or is there some other cunning arrangement?
    Normally on mine I just loosen the lazy jacks line so that I have plenty of slack, gather them together, hook them around the reefing horns on each side of the boom and then pull them tight again.
    So instead of leading from the stack pack straight upwards, they lead along the boom to the mast, around the reefing horn and then up the mast to.

    Once they're out the way I roll up the sides of the stack pack and secure with velcro.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Me: Johannesburg South Africa Yacht: Richards Bay East Coast Africa
    Posts
    6,777

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    Looking at the stack packs on many yachts in a marina recently it looks to me as if there's no quick way of pulling the lazy-jacks forward out of the way. So to prevent the battens fouling the lazy-jacks, you have to be heading dead to windward when hoisting sail. The only way to do that is to use your engine. I wouldn't want to have to be dependant on an engine to hoist sail.
    My lazy jacks like most have 3 rings 2 lower and one upper. I have threaded a line from the aft most lower ring through the fwd most ring to a block on the mast to allow the lazy jacks to be pulled forward to the mast for raising the main with not battens catching. I can then release the line and pull the lazy jacks tight to lower the main as normal.

    Several people in our marina has done the same. Mine are at the mast but they could be taken back to the cockpit is required.

    This is another way

    Last edited by Rogershaw; 25-06-16 at 18:38.
    Life is too short not to have a sea view
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  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,780

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    Looking at the stack packs on many yachts in a marina recently it looks to me as if there's no quick way of pulling the lazy-jacks forward out of the way. So to prevent the battens fouling the lazy-jacks, you have to be heading dead to windward when hoisting sail. The only way to do that is to use your engine. I wouldn't want to have to be dependant on an engine to hoist sail.
    The boat doesn't have to be "heading dead to windward". It's only necessary to free off the sheet so that the boom and sail are lying to the wind. No need for engine.

  7. #27
    {151760} is offline Account Closed (By user's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,050

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    We had a system with plastic pulleys at the joins of the lazyjacks. The battens caught on them every time. I replaced them with plastic thimbles this year. Now it's no problem at all. I also allowed enough line so that I can pull them forwards if necessary.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,462

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Have very basic lazy jacks due to be improved but I would welcome comments about stowing the sail and getting it up for that matter.

    i used to set the boat on an upwind course motoring slowly under autopilot to stow the main.
    it frightened me how far the boat could travel whilst I concentrated on the sail whilst not looking around as much as I should (singlehanded)

    Now I try to stop the boat drop the main and get it stowed before the boat has gone too far""...............

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    236

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    I have lazy-jacks on my Achilles 24, and am considering getting rid of them—there are (if I remember correctly) three attachment points on the boom, and I find myself almost invariably up on the coachroof while hoisting the sail to grab the leech and pull the first batten or two clear of the lazy-jacks (if not dead into wind). I don't much like that problem, and don't find them all that much help when stowing the sail, a bight of which often seems to flop out of the aft end. I suspect the positioning of the boom attachment points could be improved, but given the comparatively small sail I am inclined to do away with them completely, though I might investigate StormNorm's solution.
    I have sailed with stack-packs on larger charter boats, and I must say they are excellent when set up right, provided you are willing to live with being almost dead into wind to hoist the sail.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    3,525

    Default Re: Lazyjacks, stackpacks etc.

    Surely the issue with positioning the boat to more or less to windward when handing or reefing the main with lazyjacks fitted (which you have to fit if you've got a stackpack covering system) is that you have to do this anyway even if you don't have lazyjacks!

    You want the airstream from well forward of the mast so that the sail flutters up/down, so there's no excessive friction due to side forces acting on the sliders, and so your battens are clear of the aft shrouds anyway.

    My habit it to always let off the mainsheet a bit and adjust my heading to ensure that there's a very slight press of wind on one side (the starboard side for obvious reasons in crowded waters), and so that the boom is sufficiently out for standing-room and for safety if I have to go up to deal with (eg reefing) lines at the mast.

    Don't tell me I have to motor rigidly to windward to achieve any of this with lazyjacks?
    Plan B...?

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