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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    36,623

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by A1GSS View Post
    Very interesting this. On the question of in-mast reefing, my own (modest) experience is that in addition to actual reefing, it's also much easier (and arguably safer) to stow the main from the cockpit without having to stand atop the cabin roof to flake. Lazyjacks and stackpack ease that a lot. .
    Generally, those without in-mast furling say it's not necessary; those with in-mast furling say it's indispensable! I single-hand a lot, and I'm firmly in the in-mast camp, having had it on my boats for the last 30 years.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Home: Saffron Walden... boatless
    Posts
    2,441

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by pagoda View Post
    On a 409, the boom is pretty high,so the sail flakes itself fairly well. My moral of "reef immediately when it crosses your mind" generally allows it to be done in safety. Putting off reefing is a bad concept, especially solo.
    Yes agreed, my point was that in-mast reefing (or furling if you prefer) could be safer and easier than flaking or stackpack plus ties/cover, no matter whether its for reefing purposes, or for furling at the end of the sail....
    Graham. "Scala" now sold. Boatless.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Home: Saffron Walden... boatless
    Posts
    2,441

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Generally, those without in-mast furling say it's not necessary; those with in-mast furling say it's indispensable! I single-hand a lot, and I'm firmly in the in-mast camp, having had it on my boats for the last 30 years.
    Thanks, useful. I'm planning to have it on my next boat.
    Graham. "Scala" now sold. Boatless.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,104

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by A1GSS View Post
    Thanks, useful. I'm planning to have it on my next boat.
    Absolutely fine by me.... I came from a dinghy and windsurfing past, so a fully battened taffeta/laminate main is my preference for performance and good sailing. That does not come with an in mast option!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Carribbean currently Grenada
    Posts
    6,818

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    No real problems in the sailing as other have said. The only essential being a good autopilot.

    If the Jeanneau 409/419 has an option to fit an inner forestay then having a cutter rig with a 100% max staysail makes life a lot easier when short tacking. Roll up the genny and the staysail is easy to handle

    If you are going to keep it in a marina then I would regard a midships cleat and a bow thruster as essentials. Not required if you are going to keep it on a mooring. F*** U* on a mooring and you go round again, F*** U* in a marina and you better have good insurance and a good yard on tap.

    If you intend to anchor a lot an electric windlass with cockpit control makes life easier.

    I dislike in mast reefing for singlehanded sailing as when it goes wrong it can be difficult or impossible to fix at sea on your own. Slab reefing and full length battens with lazy jacks and a stackpack works for me. Note that Jeanne Socrates has a full batten main with slab reefing.

    Yes when in mast furling works perfectly you have easy mainsail handling but at the expense of a poor shape even when new.

    I have been single handing a 44 ft cutter for 8 years as an old fart.
    Last edited by TQA; 28-07-16 at 19:45.
    Monkey patching programmer [retired ]

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Milton Keynes - Boat at Levington
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Thanks everyone for the replies. I basically want all the options I can have to make single handed easier but also with a view to have good performance later down the line as experience grows. The in-mast option seems to limit that somewhat. Self-tacking jib is certainly an option. I will also look into the Jeanneau 360 option as I will be keeping her in a Marina (possibly Haslar) and am fully aware of the risk of pranging it and hitting my wallet where it hurts. I plan to do the CC and Day Skipper before purchasing the boat unless one of the dealers make me an offer hard to refuse (and with the £ being pretty poor at the moment I doubt that's going to happen) and in which case I would get assistance sailing her down to my chosen marina and either let her sit there until the courses are done or have some personal tuition in the meantime. The 389 would probably be the more sensible option but the family all felt much more comfortable on the 419 so the 389 would take a lot more convincing It's a big investment so I don't want to have to buy again in a few years.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Scotland.
    Posts
    14,368

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by pagoda View Post
    ... I would hesitate about going too high tech ...
    Of course, Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters were designed to be sailed by 'a boy' single handed and at 40' they were the epitome of high tech in their day. I have sailed one on a day sail and they are truly easy to sail.

    I disagree with hi tech being potentially more problematic in the future, especially if it is fitted when new and integrate and most importantly maintained.

    It all comes down to the attitude of the new sailor, if the OP wants to sail solo is prepared to buy a new boat, is prepared to look after it to the standard required for reliability then I think the OP should take full advantage of modern technologies. After all the purpose of technology improvements is to increase productivity by making tasks efficient and likely safer.

    At the end of the day its up to the OP and the style of sailing he wants to i.e. Pilot Cutters or Jeanneau 409/419.
    "'...contradictions .... are deliberate exercises in doublethink." Orwell from 1984

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,620

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Plenty of good advice already on thread. All I can add is that as a single-handed offshore Jonny no-mates, reliability and redundancy are my priorities on my 32ft Jeanneau. A simple easily handled rig, in-cockpit reefing, decent autopilot, boom-brake are all obvious. But the real key to single-handing is a reliable boat with redundant systems. That means spending a lot more money on maintenance, and doubling critical systems. I have installed an inner forestay and staysail. I have two autopilots which can work entirely independently if necessary. Above all, I maintain the boat myself and without compromise.
    I'd miss my compost heap

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,436

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Single handing is just that - single handing. If you are talking about sailing with the family who will be sitting below, that is not single handing because in an emergency they can come & hold the wheel, grab a line, tie on a fender act as look outs etc .
    Single handing a yacht at sea is easy once under way but approaching a port is where it gets awkward. Forumites mention berthing in ones own berth but in the last 7 weeks I have entered my own berth twice & strange berths 18 times so one has to be a bit more aware than suggested. Sometimes one has to moor in a box ( stern to poles or a buoy as in Ostend or Holland), or raft up, sometimes the pontoons are very short. One does not always know until one gets there.

    In addition problems can occur. For instance yesterday I found my engine was not drawing water as the impeller had failed. Going below in 24 kts wind to change it in a boat that would not heave too made me sea sick & in the river Blackwater I soon ran out of room so had to keep coming on deck to change course. A simple issue became a nightmare. It would have been worse coming into a strange area like Treguier where I had been a few weeks earlier.

    Getting the main stuck with in mast reefing ( & I have seen this happen a number of times) can be a stressful time for a single hander & the bigger the main the more difficult it becomes. I certainly would not consider it. Certainly i could not stand constantly looking at the the poor sail shape all day long.
    A failed furler on a large genoa might mean dropping the sail. Try that on a 40 ft boat in a gale.
    So whilst single handing can be easy - I do it all the time & do 2000 miles a year in a 31 ft boat- every year I have at least one drama when something goes wrong.
    That is when size can overpower the sailor but at 69 yrs old perhaps I am getting weak. I recently looked at changing to a 37 ft boat for more comfort but when i studied the increase in sails etc I changed my mind.

    There has been comment about self tacking sails. I have a self tacker & a genoa. In 13 years I have only used the genoa when racing with a crew. I find the self tacker very good & off wind I have down haulers fitted to set it better or use a cruising chute. I would recommend the self tacking option every time, but then I am a biased Hanse owner

    A modern 37 ft boat is plenty big enough for a family of 4 with the occasional guest. Some models are fast & stable with all the items that are needed for modern comfort.Being a Hanse owner I know of several Hanse 37ft's that have crossed the Atlantic & i am sure lots of similar sized other AWB's have done it in comfort as well.

    Personally I see little need for some of the bloated oversized yachts that are currently being sold for small families - but to each his own
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 29-07-16 at 07:36.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    2,220

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Stack pack and lazy jacks work far better on a system that has roller cars and a fully battened main. I could drop the main or reef quickly and easily with only one rope holding it all up. When you have roller systems and they break it's rare that you can then easily get rid of sail. I've sailed with in mast and rotating boom systems.

    Jib definitely get self tacking.

    Look at setting up a system where you can pull up the anchor from the cockpit and let it out, I've used a system where the anchor could be pulled up using a powered genoa winch. Useful if getting out of a busy anchorage as you can be on the steering and engine as it clears the bottom and you drift off.

    Extra fenders are a good option for berthing and short ish mooring lines attached to centre cleat so you can quickly get a spring on and then let the engine hold you alongside.
    quicKutter rope cutter, shaft and rudder bearings
    www.h4marine.com

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