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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    8,051

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_Y View Post

    Look at setting up a system where you can pull up the anchor from the cockpit and let it out
    Cheap option for that : http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ELECTRIC-W...oAAOSwHnFVp13r

    Used one for 3 years on last boat without issue.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    East Med...
    Posts
    1,676

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_Y View Post
    Look at setting up a system where you can pull up the anchor from the cockpit and let it out,.
    Very wise words. I single handle my Beneteau 361, I installed a remote control (one of those cheap ones from ebay; works just fine) to drop the anchor while at the helm BUT due to the anchor locker and the chain piling up I cannot pull it up from the helm. This is unfortunately a problem that MANY boats have. Luckily usually it's easier to leave the cockpit in order to lift the anchor rather than drop it.
    Keep sailing

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    14,383

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Generally, those without in-mast furling say it's not necessary; those with in-mast furling say it's indispensable! I single-hand a lot, and I'm firmly in the in-mast camp, having had it on my boats for the last 30 years.
    I have never had a boat with in-mast reefing but I have helped many friends trying to recover the sail after mishaps, especially when flexible battens get twisted and jammed.
    My opinion of in-mast reefing / furling is that "When it is good it is very, very good but when it is bad it is awful". Just a personal opinion, of course.
    Should we paint what is on a face, what is inside it, or what is behind it?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    36,655

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by PuffTheMagicDragon View Post
    I have never had a boat with in-mast reefing but I have helped many friends trying to recover the sail after mishaps, especially when flexible battens get twisted and jammed.
    My opinion of in-mast reefing / furling is that "When it is good it is very, very good but when it is bad it is awful". Just a personal opinion, of course.
    Very few in-mast sails have battens.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Colchester, Essex
    Posts
    4,751

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    One must have feature for a stack pack, cockpit led halyard main is a retrieval line... Attach a light line to the top slide, lead down to the deck, turning block, deck organiser, back to cockpit. When you lower the mean, you can pull it down with the line, and get all the slides/batten cars "chock-a-block". It needs a jammer of some sort, so that when you hoist it, you can just take the slack out and have it finish up around the radar reflector, and also when down, you can take the tension back into the main halyard to stop that doing the same...
    Larry Botheras

    Colvic Victor 35 "Gladys"

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Leicestershire
    Posts
    1,134

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    I also don't think sailing with the family, even non-sailors equates to single handed. Single-handed means one pair of hands and all the limitations that go with that and no-one to share problems with even if they can't contribute much by way of solutions.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Milton Keynes - Boat at Levington
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by eddystone View Post
    I also don't think sailing with the family, even non-sailors equates to single handed. Single-handed means one pair of hands and all the limitations that go with that and no-one to share problems with even if they can't contribute much by way of solutions.
    Yes, I take your point although I have a nagging doubt that they will be as willing to go out as regularly as I intend to so I'll plan on being billy-no-mates a lot of the time

    After feedback on this thread and PM's I am of the opinion that the self-tacking jib probably is a good option but I am still not sold on the in-mast furler so will stick with the standard stack pack arrangement. Oddly (I never dream!) I also had a dream last night that I was taking delivery of a 389 so perhaps the smaller (slightly) boat is worth looking at again. Regard tech, I do like a gadget and work in the IT industry so will probably go with the latest 2017 spec "Ocean" electronics package from the factory. This currently consists of:

    - 2 RAYMARINE i70s MULTIFUNCTION DISPLAYS
    - 1 DEPTH-SPEED SENSOR
    - 1 MASTHEAD WIND SENSOR
    - 1 RAYMARINE RAY50 VHF
    - 1 AIS 650 RAYMARINE TRANSCEIVER
    - 1 RAYMARINE p70s AUTOPILOT + ACU400 CORE UNIT AND GYROCOMPAS
    - 1 AUTOPILOT WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL (SMART CONTROLLER)
    - 1 GPS RAYMARINE eS75 MULTIFUNCTION TOUCHSCREEN DISPLAY WITH WIFI
    - 1 SCANSTRUT PIVOTING GPS CONSOLE 7"

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    East Med...
    Posts
    1,676

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Classic main, in mast main etc it doesn't matter what you have as long as you know how to use it properly single handed. I have in mast furling which I use alone day or night, day sailing or offshore with the rest of the family sleeping in their cabins. I have learned how to use it and I am careful. Since 2008 I never had any issues (touch wood for this) with neither the old one nor the replacement (by the way when the sail getts baggy is when problems begin; to unfurl it usually you pull directly from the sail. Even in this case you learn what to do). If I was changing my boat will I consider a classic main or an in mast again? Honestly, I don't mind. The in mast furling is nice and simple but the look of a full batten clasic main sail is really sexy! I will not mention perfomance difference because it's all relevant. You are limited to 2-3 reefs on a classic sail vs unlimited on a furling so you don't necessarily go faster with a classic main when it's time to reef. So to conclude, since it will be your first boat don't worry about the sail, just learn how to use it correctly.
    What I could advice though is to have a boat that at least one of the two sails can be controlled from the helm. Don't just rely on a good autopilot (which is a MUST by the way). In a sudden gust you must be able to release fast one of the two sails (for a fractional usually the best will be the main sail but as a compromise even the genoa will do). And yes you could steer upwind if you can't reach them but it's good to be able to control at least one. Of course having said that, you will not have such problem with the Jeanneau 409/419 because both sails can be controlled from the helm.
    By the way, the Jeanneau 409 is the number one boat in my dream list. I have just not convinced myself yet to say goodbye to my trusty and lovely current boat.
    Keep sailing

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    32,180

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Having just been through the same process, I echo most of what has been said above - except the doom mongers' comments on in mast furling, which does not reflect my experience over the last 15 years. Note that almost 100% of HRs over 37' have Selden in mast, and these are boats designed and used for ocean cruising.

    Anyway, I looked at all the main AWBs specifically on ease of single handing and they all have their pros and cons. The key things to look at are handling in close quarters and a bow thruster is essential; anchoring - so electric windlass with remote (I have a Sidepower remote that does both the bow thruster and the windlass); easily handled sails, so in mast and small jib; ergonomic cockpit layout with both sheets easily worked from the wheel, and room to move around the cockpit easily.

    Not all boats have all these features. Some have big wheels which limit movement, foresail winches that can't be worked from the wheel, mainsheets on the coachroof and large genoas which require a lot of grunt. Placement of engine controls, instruments and autopilot controls are also very variable. Twin wheels help many boats, particularly the ability to move around, but sometimes that leads to poor seating at the wheel.

    On balance on these criteria Bavarias stood out as being closest to the ideal, although others all had their own attractions. The 37 in particular would suit very well. Generally more spacious than other similar size boats, a mainsail orientated rig, in mast with main sheet led back to the wheel and aft mounted sheet winches. I actually bought a 33 (to replace an earlier 37) as I have no need of a larger boat.

    Might I suggest that you charter some of the boats you are looking at - most of them you should be able to find easily so that you get a feel for what works for you. As many have said actually managing a boat single handed when on passage is not difficult, but in my experience it is the hour or so at the beginning and the end of a passage which is challenging - setting and stowing sails, moving around on deck for anchoring or preparing for berthing, then parking the boat. My new boat is so much better in this respect that I actually look forward to tacking in and out of the harbour, whereas with the old one it was normal to motor out into clear water before setting sail.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,444

    Default Re: Single hand a Jeanneau 409/419?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gladys View Post
    One must have feature for a stack pack, cockpit led halyard main is a retrieval line... Attach a light line to the top slide, lead down to the deck, turning block, deck organiser, back to cockpit. When you lower the mean, you can pull it down with the line, and get all the slides/batten cars "chock-a-block". It needs a jammer of some sort, so that when you hoist it, you can just take the slack out and have it finish up around the radar reflector, and also when down, you can take the tension back into the main halyard to stop that doing the same...
    I doubt if you have actually tried that !!!
    Recipe for disaster. The ends of the battens come down too quickly & catch in the sails & jam in the sail making it difficult to stack the sail.
    It is better if you pull the sail down manually & you can control the battens so they come down horizontally .
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

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