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Thread: Bestevaer 49

  1. #81
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
    Posts
    2,595

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    The chain will probably be 120m of 12mm G4. At this stage we have not planned details such as a spare rode.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    2,810

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    If the windlass is fitted then you are almost, committed to 12mm - but 120m x 12mm x G4 is well over strength and immensely heavy. Its a good thing you have a Maxwell windlass - I'd hate to need to retrieve by hand.

    It depends on how adventurous your are going to be but I predict (given the yacht you will have and if you use it to its potential), spare rode, stern anchoring gear, including rode (in addition to spare) and 2-4 shore lines of 200m each. You obviously don't need them for sitting around in the Med - but other locations? - it will be difficult/expensive or messy to retrofit.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
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    2,595

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    I thought they may be some interest in some of the electronic equipment that is to be installed.

    Thrane LT1000 GPS compass:

    This is an interesting product. Until recently GPS compasses have been very expensive and only used on larger ships. Lately they have come down in price and there have been a number released, mainly by Simrad.

    A conventional GPS cannot provide any heading information, only COG. In other words the GPS does not know which way the bow is pointing, only the direction in which it is moving. A GPS compass uses two GPS units and from this information can deduce direction. This is combined with a number of gyros and a conventional fluxgate compass to smooth the output and provide a back up if the GPS signal is lost, for example inside a tunnel.

    The technology has the potential to provide better heading information than the best 3D gyro compasses. The primary advantage is that accurate heading information helps the autopilot steer more accurately, but it also has benefits synchronising a radar/chart/AIS overlay and gives improved accuracy for MARPA.

    A secondary benefit is they tend to produce a more accurate position output, so for example SOG is stable.

    The Thrane unit also has a number of other outputs that are useful. These include the heel angle, trim angle (the amount the bow or stern is pitching), rate of turn, barometric pressure and air temperature. It sends this information out simultaneously on NMEA 0183 and NMEA 2000. Some GPS units that transmit NMEA 0183 and NMEA 2000 force you to select one or the other.

    So far I have only mounted the unit in my workshop, so a full report will have to wait until the boat is launched. Installation is easy. The unit can even be switched to include a termination resistor if you want to have it on the end of a backbone. The only difficulty is that to work well it needs to be mounted with a reasonably clear view of the sky and free from multi path distortion. On the plus side, there is less concern with magnetic fields such as from electric wires, providing these are kept a reasonable distance away.

    Some parameters can only be adjusted via PC, but there is no need to do this if the compass is mounted level and in line.

    The initial impression is very favorable. It responds very rapidly to any heading change and the readout is completely stable if the heading is unchanged. The heading information is slightly changed when there is nearby magnetic field. Much less than a traditional electronic compass, indicating it is primarily using the GPS signal, but obviously integrating a flugate compass together with the gyro into the heading output.

    One negative is that the temperature reading is accurate, but the unit slightly heats up, so the temperature is a couple of degrees above the actual air temperature. This would be less with some airflow, but the compass is likely to heat up from sunlight. An offset to the temperature is possible but accuracy is likely to be poor.

    The unit is reasonably small for a GPS compass: only 151 mm (about 6 inches) long. This makes it far more practical to mount on a yacht, but it reduces the separation of the GPS units. This will have some effect on the performance and it will be interesting to see how good the heading information is in practice. On the plus side, the compass has more sophisticated GPS units and gyros than the opposition. The claimed heading specifications are more accurate than the equivalent Simrad unit, but it is hard to compare numbers from different manufacturers.

    If nothing else, the Thrane unit should provide very accurate 10hz 72-ch. GNSS and GLONASS GPS unit together with useful outputs like the angle of heel and air pressure. It is about 2.5 -3x more expensive than a good quality conventional GPS. Not cheap, but arguably worthwhile for these features alone, even ignoring the heading information.
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  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
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    2,595

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Vesper Vision

    I have hooked this up on a temporary basis on land. We are on the water's edge so there are plenty of ships on collision course . This gives an opportunity to try the unit and this is my impression so far:

    Firstly the software is brilliant. The dangerous targets are colour coded in two stages (orange and red) and made larger on the screen. In a cluttered waterway this makes it easy to see the ships that have collision potential. The software on the anchor alarm is also much better than is available on most chart plotters, enabling a sensitive alarm with no false positives to be set.

    The unit connects easily to virtually any chart plotter, has an internal GPS aerial and also sends this information over wifi so the AIS or anchor alarm can be seen (and controlled) on tablets or smartphones. This is ideal for monitoring the anchor alarm by the bed. The wifi signal is independent of display on the unit so you can have the anchor alarm displayed on your smartphone while the unit displays AIS information. Or two ranges of AIS.

    The other great feature is low power consumption. This is especially helpful when using the anchor alarm, as the unit will be on all night.

    Drawbacks:

    There are going to be newer, higher powered class B transponders released in the near future so if you can hold off purchase it may be sensible.

    The Vesper screen is quite low definition with a poor viewing angle by modern standards. This helps contribute to the lower power consumption and the information can seen on the chart plotter or tablet in better definition, but much better screens are available.

    The anchor alarm also displays distance to the anchor, bearing to the anchor, heading and depth. All great information, but apparent wind speed would also be useful when monitoring the anchor alarm. This should be a simple software change so perhaps Vesper can incorporate this in the future.

    The AIS information is easily displayed on the chart plotter (just plug and play for NMEA20000, but the clever filtering information is not reproduced on the chart plotter (unless there is way to do this that I have not found). I can understand why, there are no NMEA sentences to transfer this information, but perhaps a way around this problem could be found in future. The filtered information is sent over wifi.

    One other glitch I have noted concerns the wind speed alarm.

    The wind speed alarm is useful when using the anchor watch. There is also a wind shift alarm, all great features.

    However, there appears to be a software bug that when the windspeed drops to zero (but the anemometer is still connected to the NMEA network) an alarm sounds to inform that wind data has been "lost".

    Power consumption is important and there is very little data from manufacturers so I will post some numbers, which may be helpful.

    So @ 13.8v my Vesper Vision in receive mode (I cannot test transmit at the moment) wifi on, with an external GPS aerial is consuming 0.45A at full brightness . At 50% brightness this drops to 0.35A. Interestingly 0% brightness saves very little extra power with a consumption of 0.33A. I expected "Night mode" (a red a black display) to be lower, but it was almost exactly the same.

    So if you are setting an anchor watch all night and want to save a little power turn the screen down to 50%, but there is little point going lower, unless the aim is preserve your night vision.

    These numbers are very good. Using the Vesper instead of a typical medium sized modern chart plotter for the anchor alarm will save roughly around 1A for most installations. So overnight something like 10 AHrs less (for a 12v system). Older or larger chartplotters often have higher consumption so the savings will be greater.

    I will report more when I have installed the unit permanently. Vesper also sell a version without the screen and a version with no screen and no wifi.
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