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Thread: Bestevaer 49

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    The interior is a mixture of white ceilings and walls together with with Bubinga, a beautiful and a very hard South African timber for the furniture, doors and floors. This has been combined with stainless steel for the kitchen work surfaces. As always, these finishes are personal taste, but the overall result is coming together just as we hoped.

    We have tried to avoid veneer and so all the Bubinga is solid. Here are some of the cupboard doors awaiting their final sanding, but this shows the solid timber used in the construction:


  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Sydney, Australia.
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    3,611

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Nice cabinet work. I always open drawers and look to see if they dovetailed the joints - if they did I know the quality will be good throughout. We went for a more modern look and chose a very pale wood also from South Africa, Koto African Ash. It has certainly stood the test of time. We did not get all of our choices right when we built and it was only when we were into our 4th saloon table we were happy. Some of our other choices were not quite perfect - but we have learnt to live with them.

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 15-07-17 at 07:09.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    This is the largest of three stainless steel bench tops in the galley. Each one has a waterproof lip on all 4 sides. This will act as a small fiddle, but primarily means any minor spills are contained. Liquid on the floor quickly finds its way into the bilge and can be a mess to clean up. The integrated lip also avoids the need for sealant (this unavoidably deteriorates with age and apart from looking unsightly it can leak).




    The central galley bench top can be seen in the background:


  4. #34
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Put this all together and this is how the interior is shaping up. You can also see several of the inspection hatches for the fuel tanks:








  5. #35
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    East Sussex.
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Once finished that wood will look lovely, with either an oiled finish or a semi matt varnish. Have you decided what finish to use? Whilst most people use varnish, for the wood floor I laid in my lounge at home I decided on a semi matt oil finish and found it much easier to get a finish without brush marks. I think repairs and refinishing will be much easier than re-varnishing. I wonder if something like this http://www.wood-finishes-direct.com/...XTUaAvyL8P8HAQ would be suitable in a yacht. It certainly makes a hard, smooth and scuff resistant finish, and I think its water resistant to anything short of immersion.
    Working on immortality - One day at a time.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Yorkshire England
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    734

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Hi Noelex

    Thanks for sharing the build process - looks a great boat.

    I'd be interested to know your thought processes that ruled out other aluminium variants e.g. Boreal 47/52 or Garcia 45/52

    Cheers

  7. #37
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Thanks for the link, Norman. The timber will be oiled. We have found that oil works well on a liveaboard boat. Some of the timber has already been oiled with Livos Kunos, but I will take a look at the product you recommended as an alternative.

  8. #38
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    East Sussex.
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    19,679

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Good choice to use an oiled finish. I think it looks nicer as well as being easier to "top up". By the way, I like the way the galley is designed so that you can wedge yourself in there if preparing food in rough conditions.
    Last edited by Norman_E; 16-07-17 at 09:34.
    Working on immortality - One day at a time.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Sydney, Australia.
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    The yacht looks absolutely gorgeous, exceptionally well built and planned with considerable thought but for lesser mortals there were some questions of your experience with G70 which might be directly useful to them, see post 22. You are one of the few who has used G70 for a considerable period of time, there are people here who have considered G70 and postponed or abandoned the idea and some who are using it.

    You recommended for some years the use of G70 and a large anchor - so at one point you thought it was advantageous - your decision not to use it now is that it has short life and the weight saving is less necessary when centrally stored. Many would think 1,000 nights at anchor a fair life - and might even be encouraged to use it.

    So how about some directly applicable experience.

    Jonathan

  10. #40
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    As you point out, for those that are anchoring less frequently the shorter life is less of an issue, but we intend to use the new boat in the same way as we sailed for the last 10 years, which is anchoring around 300 days a year. The chain was "end for ended" halfway through its life. Replacing 100m of chain every 3 years is expensive and G7 is difficult to obtain complicating the logistics.

    I am not sure it is poor galvanising to blame. If you downsize the chain by one size and look underwater it moves around on the seabed and abrades significantly more. This extra movement also creates more wear in the area where the chain to chain contact occurs. In addition, the circumference of the thinner chain is less, meaning the same force is concentrated on a smaller contact area. This is the area the chain fails first.

    Anyway that is my theory regarding the short life of G7, but I think it is an area that needs more research.

    However, the anchoring gear will be one of the last details to be finalised and there are a myriad of descisions that go into making up the yacht that I think may be of interest. So back to the interior.
    Last edited by noelex; 16-07-17 at 07:00.

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