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Thread: Bestevaer 49

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    It took some time to pick details like the door handles and hinges. Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell from catalogue photos and some pieces that look nice can be flimsy pressed metal when you see them in real life.

    Here are our door handles. The waterproof door will obviously be different:

    Last edited by noelex; 16-07-17 at 07:05.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Sydney, Australia.
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    3,576

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    As you point out, for those that are anchoring less frequently the shorter life is less of an issue, but we intend to use the new boat in the same way as we sailed for the last 10 years, which is anchoring around 300 days a year. The chain was "end for ended" halfway through its life. Replacing 100m of chain every 3 years is expensive and G7 is difficult to obtain complicating the logistics.

    I am not sure it is poor galvanising to blame. If you downsize the chain by one size and look underwater it moves around on the seabed and abrades significantly more. This extra movement also creates more wear in the area where the chain to chain contact occurs. In addition, the circumference of the thinner chain is less, meaning the same force is concentrated on a smaller contact area. This is the area the chain fails first.

    Anyway that is my theory regarding the short life of G7, but I think it is an area that needs more research.

    However, the anchoring gear will be one of the last details to be finalised and there are a myriad of descisions that go into making up the yacht that I think may be of interest. So back to the interior.



    I don't quite understand lighter chain will lift more frequently and earlier so why was yours on the seabed.

    You have also suggested short scope with a big anchor is quite safe and if you shorten scope as you have suggested it would be a way to reduce gal wear as the chain would be lifted (and not wear) and as you have a big anchor - perfectly safe..

    You have mentioned you have a Maxwell windlass, windlass usually come with a gypsy so surely you have already decided what chain you will use. Chain size and weight is usually the detail that defines windlass size. You have already decided on the anchor - you are going to use your old Mantus - so you appear to have already decided on your anchoring gear. Frankly to decide on door handle and to leave chain (and the rest of ground tackle) till later seems a bit odd - considering your interests.

    But to return to your G70 - why not regal the chain - its common practice to regal chain and done here in the UK quite frequently and documented on this forum.

    The door handles look very nice but are hardly critical - unlike the ground tackle which I would have thought would be very high on your priorities - especially given your interests. Excuse me if I think you are obfuscating - surely you do not have second thoughts.

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 16-07-17 at 09:01.

  3. #43
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    Jul 2005
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave100456 View Post
    Hi Noelex

    Thanks for sharing the build process - looks a great boat.

    I'd be interested to know your thought processes that ruled out other aluminium variants e.g. Boreal 47/52 or Garcia 45/52

    Cheers

    Yes, the yachts you mentioned are great alternatives. We looked at all the options and we spent a few days at the Garcia factory in 2014.

    Each boat has is strengths and weaknesses, but at the end of the day we went with a Bestevaer.

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    The boat has a seperate day diesel tank. This is it upside down. The sump can be seen at the top.


  5. #45
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    More unusual. It also has a day water tank:


  6. #46
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    Jul 2005
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    These are he interior lights made by Prebit. Most of the lighting is via these downlights that are infinitely dimmable and can be switched between white and red. They conveniently remember the last setting (even if power is removed). Ours are the matt version of these:


    Narrow angle adjustable spots will illuminate artwork:




    Wall lights have glass shades. They will be fitted where breakage will be unlikely. These create a lovely warm glow when on. Ours will be the non stripey version of these:






    In the shower and toilet area the downlights are slightly different, as they need to be waterproof. Switches have been fitted externally, as it is hard to make them 100% waterproof and showers on boats are wet and humid environments, which is not ideal for switch life, especially low voltage DC switches:

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
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    4,359

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Thanks for the updates. I should probably stop reading this thread because I *was* quite happy with the boat I already have...
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  8. #48
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    Jul 2005
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Thanks for all the good wishes.

    This is the bones of the main switchboard panel. We are using DIN mounted circuit breakers. These are easily replaced if they become defective, as a number of companies make identical products. They have higher performance specifications (such as interrupt capacity) than the typical pleasure boat circuit breaker panels.

    The same idea was used on the original Bestevaer 2 and these has also been used in the latest Dashew FPB range.

    This is more "industrial" looking than the typical marine circuit breaker panel, but can still be finished attractively when all the trim is installed. In our case they will be installed in a wooden cupboard recessed into the wall, which will back directly into the technical space.

    This is an alternative to the more common Blueseas panel that is worth considering, especially if you are rewiring an existing boat and replacing the switch panel.



  9. #49
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    As with several Bestevaers, our boat has some reinforcement, especially in the bow area. The plating is thicker and the framing has been beefed up.

    The owner of KM has just returned from a passage on a 55 foot version of our boat. These spectacular images have just been posted on KM's Facebook page and show the conditions the Bestevaers are capable of cruising in.




  10. #50
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    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Most boats have very poor security. I often think a thief with a screwdriver could open up many boats quicker than the owner can with those fiddly little locks .

    The other problem is if want good ventilation you need to forgo any pretence of security and leave the boat open. This can be an issue in some (fortunately rare) parts of the world where the bad guys can occasionally target owners, not just their possessions. Even in more secure parts of world leaving the boat reasonably closed up when going out for dinner means a hot boat on return. Some boats have small portholes that are too small for thief to enter. This is a big help, but often they don't let in much air, especially for sleeping comfortably on a hot night.

    We have addressed these issues in various ways. I will detail the overhead hatch construction and lockable watertight door in future posts, but for now you can see some preliminary details of the companion way.

    The companion way hatch has three elements that slide down into a aluminium box and disappear when not in use. No more finding a place to store the washboards.

    The three elements are a conventional clear plexiglass board, similar to many boats, a stainless steel security bar and a fly screen. They will have substantial locks. The elements can be used together. For example at night while sleeping if there is a need for ventilation and security the stainless bars and fly screen can be raised together.

    I think the system should work well. Of course a very determined thief can penetrate anything, but the companion way should be very difficult to break into and if we are on board the second layer of defence is a master bedroom which is enclosed between two watertight bulkheads with a very substantial and lockable watertight door. If the boat is left for long time both the conventional plexiglass board and security bars can be raised together and locked into place.

    Fortunately these steps are are rarely needed, but having them installed and easily useable gives peace of mind and the confidence to cruise some the marginal areas where it not necessarily "unsafe" to cruise, but nevertheless there are legitimate security concerns.

    Lets hope we don't lose the keys .



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