Page 7 of 31 FirstFirst ... 2345678910111217 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 304

Thread: Bestevaer 49

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,060

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Sight tubes are a great option, but they can only be used where there is access to the side of the tank with a protected space to mount a reasonably delicate tube. It is also worth considering the humble dip stick.

    Sight tubes work well for diesel tanks, but tend to develop algal growth when used on water tanks and they cannot be used, unless you are very brave , for grey and black water tanks, although some use translucent tanks which serves the same purpose.

    An alternative to a sight tube, but working on the same principal are the sight glasses. The advantage is the fuel level can be seen continuously without opening any valves and they are still visible from a reasonable distance away. The drawback is that the fuel level is only shown roughly (depending on the number of sight glasses).

    We have had three sight glasses installed on our diesel day tank. These only show a crude indication of the fuel level, unlike the tank tender that has a very fine scale, but their purpose is only to act as back up in the unlikely event the Tank Tender fails.

    This is a sight glass:




    This is from another Bestevaer, but their diesel day tank is very similar to ours. You can see the three sight glasses on the left hand side:

    Last edited by noelex; 05-09-17 at 08:30.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,060

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Fuel fill:

    There are a great number of small details that go into yacht specification. I dislike the commonly used flush deck fuel fill used on many yachts. It relies entirely on an "O" ring seal to prevent deck water from entering the diesel tank(s).

    Another alternative is to place the fill somewhere protected in the cockpit, but it can be hard to find a suitable spot, especially one that will still allow the use of a filtering funnel.

    This design was suggested by KM. It allows the fill to remain on deck, but the pipe is raised above most of the water and the seal is is more substantial.






    The water fill has deliberately been left as the conventional flush fill and the bulwark has no low drainage openings forward of it. This allows rainwater to be collected from the deck. The risk of a small amount of salt water entering the fresh water supply worries me less than water in fuel, especially as we have three water tanks and a watermaker.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    1,414

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    Fuel fill:

    There are a great number of small details that go into yacht specification. I dislike the commonly used flush deck fuel fill used on many yachts. It relies entirely on an "O" ring seal to prevent deck water from entering the diesel tank(s).

    Another alternative is to place the fill somewhere protected in the cockpit, but it can be hard to find a suitable spot, especially one that will still allow the use of a filtering funnel.

    This design was suggested by KM. It allows the fill to remain on deck, but the pipe is raised above most of the water and the seal is is more substantial.



    The water fill has deliberately been left as the conventional flush fill and the bulwark has no low drainage openings forward of it. This allows rainwater to be collected from the deck. The risk of a small amount of salt water entering the fresh water supply worries me less than water in fuel, especially as we have three water tanks and a watermaker.
    You could put a ball valve in the water fill hose to guarantee no leak. Belt and braces.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,060

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    We have had numerous handholds installed both inside and outside the boat. These are mostly aluminium tubes on the outside and stainless steel on the inside.

    The primary purpose is to ensure there is always a place to grab on, important especially in a larger boat with a reasonably open interior plan. As well as their intended function, these rails serve as great mounting points for tablets, drink holders, monitors etc. The modern mounting systems such as RAM mounts are very versatile and enable virtually any moderately sized equipment to clamped securely to a rail. With many different sized arms, the attached device can be positioned to the ideal orientation. These are easy to relocate with a wide choice of fixed and removable clamps.

    I think in addition to the normal chart plotter, we will have a couple of iPads clamped to to the rail just inside the companionway hatch. There is an overhang here creating a sheltered doghouse behind the pilot house, so I think the tablets might even be OK without any waterproof cover in most conditions. The roof also helps with sunlight visibility, which is one of the limitations of the tablet displays. The iPads can be used to display an alternative electronic mapping system (such as Navionics), mirror the chart plotter display (radar and charts and instruments) or mirror the Vesper AIS display.

    This was a trial clamping one of our old iPads to the handhold just inside the companionway. This is a high position and I think it might be better lower, but one of the benefits of this sort of clamping system is that it can easily be moved.


  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Volos-Athens
    Posts
    4,161

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    Fuel fill:

    There are a great number of small details that go into yacht specification. I dislike the commonly used flush deck fuel fill used on many yachts. It relies entirely on an "O" ring seal to prevent deck water from entering the diesel tank(s).

    Another alternative is to place the fill somewhere protected in the cockpit, but it can be hard to find a suitable spot, especially one that will still allow the use of a filtering funnel.

    This design was suggested by KM. It allows the fill to remain on deck, but the pipe is raised above most of the water and the seal is is more substantial.






    The water fill has deliberately been left as the conventional flush fill and the bulwark has no low drainage openings forward of it. This allows rainwater to be collected from the deck. The risk of a small amount of salt water entering the fresh water supply worries me less than water in fuel, especially as we have three water tanks and a watermaker.
    nice detailing noelex. Keep on thinking that most of the mobo water in fuel and bug issues come from the flush mounted diesel filling points seen on most premium brands! Mine is hidden under the step from aft deck to side deck and there's no way in hell water is getting there...
    How is that going to work with barefeet moving about, isn't there a danger of breaking small toes on it? Is it hidden somewhere that you're not meant to walk by, or am I missing something?

    A few more built pics wouldn't go amiss!

    cheers

    V.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,401

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    After the rousing support you gave the Mantus anchor, to the exclusion of almost everything else, I am assuming you are installing another, or even the same, Mantus. You mentioned there was an issue with the bowsprit fouling the roll bar, of the Mantus and I assume other roll barred anchors, but that the builder was sure he could overcome the issue. With your unquestionable support for your favourite model I am sure you have encouraged the builder to resolve the issue to your satisfaction as I cannot think you will be happy with what you considered previously as 'second best'.

    From another post, or maybe another but similar thread, I recall the yacht should be launched in October so assume the bowsprit/anchor issue has been resolved - it would be odd to launch without an anchor! and even more odd not to have resolved the bowsprit issue.

    So what was the eventual outcome - many bought a Mantus on your recommendations - and I am sure they will be pleased to see you continuing your support and maybe question if you change camps. Many will also be pleased to see how the bowsprit/bow roller were modified to accommodate a roll bar.

    Jonathan

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,060

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by Zing View Post
    You could put a ball valve in the water fill hose to guarantee no leak. Belt and braces.
    Quote Originally Posted by vas View Post
    Mine is hidden under the step from aft deck to side deck and there's no way in hell water is getting there...
    These are all good solutions that should be much more waterproof than the traditional flush deck fill. Hopefully boatbuilders will more frequently adopt some of these ideas on production blue water boats. The solutions are not expensive.

    Quote Originally Posted by vas View Post
    How is that going to work with barefeet moving about, isn't there a danger of breaking small toes on it?
    Deck safety has been a consideration. The a high bulwark/toe rail, plenty of handholds, and reasonably high lifelines should make it a safe boat. Eliminating all the potential toe snubbers is difficult on a yacht. Cruising almost 365 days a years we have found you learn where the hazards are and avoid them, without thinking, even at night. It is more of a concern for those boats that frequently have new crew, such as charter boats for example. It does take a while on a new boat to learn the safest way to move forward.

    As well as the fuel deck fills there is plenty of other raised deck gear on our boat such as lots of handholds, chain stopper, large non retractable cleats, raised hatches and even tie down points for wind scoops and storm covers around the hatches. While these are potential toe snubbers they serve as good spots to brace a foot when heeled over.

    The modern flush hatches, minimal toe rail, retractable cleats mean there is nothing to snub your toe. It also gives the yacht a beautiful and racy low profile, but especially when going from the mast to the bow across a wet and angled foredeck, there not many places where your feet can a get some grip.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,060

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    So what was the eventual outcome
    There is still a lot of work to be done on the boat and a myriad of details to sort out so we are no further along with the anchor than the last couple of times you have asked.

    We need the retractable bow sprit before we can start trial fitting the anchor and I am not sure on the timeline for that at the moment, but I am reasonably confident that the Mantus will fit fine.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    BC Canada
    Posts
    664

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    1. I had a 12 inch high standpipe welded to the metal deck INSIDE a deck locker at the bow end of the cabin. Tight diesel seal and inside the locker.

    2. Float gauge stainless steel as used in commercial storage and truck tanks works for me as a diesel gauge in the day tank and main tank. Inexpensive and corrosion and leak proof. Just like the gauge in an outboard tank but much deeper and in stainless
    37 foot steel sailboat in Comox, B.C. Canada.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    791

    Default Re: Bestevaer 49

    Can I ask what sort of heating system you are going to use?

Page 7 of 31 FirstFirst ... 2345678910111217 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to