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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Now lurking around a port near you - maybe.
    Posts
    65

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by FirstAway View Post
    As a relative newcomer to anchoring in Greece I have followe this thread with interest. I apologise for a bit of a thread drift, but would be interested in the views of the more experienced in the use of anchor buoys. I can see a benefit to be able to see where everybody's anchor lies, but it also becomes another piece of rope for all to get tangled up with? So please, do you use one and why / why not?
    Years ago I used an anchor buoy every time; there simply weren't so many boats and there was plenty of space. Moreover, people generally knew what anchor buoys were!

    It was a small metal buoy (they used to make them for the purpose) with an anchor painted on it.

    One day, when in the Bay of Naples, a stiff breeze was blowing on to the quay where we lay stern-to the single anchor. A large Guardia di Finanza patrol boat (c. 80 feet) arrived in the harbour with aplomb and promptly manoeuvred towards our buoy and proceeded to pick it up. Meanwhile I was starting the main engine to be able to react to the seemingly inevitable disaster.

    Fortunately, there was some slack in the quite light anchor buoy line and one of the patrol boat sailors quickly realised it was not a mooring buoy that had been fished up on deck, but an anchor buoy (it might also be that the impressive plume of exhaust smoke on an 'emergency start' had caught his eye!). The buoy was hurriedly dropped, the anchor held and my blood pressure began to slowly descend after its crescendo...

    Phew! What if I hadn't been enjoying the view of the harbour? Mmm...

    I have not used an anchor buoy again!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cruising Med
    Posts
    784

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    I very rarely deploy an anchor buoy. Reasons : if someone else does not get tangled in the buoys rope, then you will. Most sailors are old and almost blind.
    However, sometimes ( when using two anchors ) it is nice to have something indicating where the anchors are. Mostly to help others see where my spikes lay.
    In that case I place a clearly marked anchor buoy. My anchor buoy is NOT connected to the anchor.
    Snorkelling I put a buoy near my anchor ( sometimes a bit further ) with a stone as a weight.
    It happened twice some idiot wanted to use my anchor buoy as a mooring and once ( Villefrance ) I saw some dayboat pulling my anchor to the surface while I was visiting a friend in the marina.
    I guess they just wanted to know what was on that cute little buoy. That was a16 kg CQR and a lot of chain. We ware very lucky the anchor set again since it is a ¾ hour walk to the anchorage.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The land of sun
    Posts
    3,873

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    I am sure we talked about this in the pass .
    Anyway if I feel the need to use an another buoy ( i.e. An tripping line ) , we would lay one the normal way except ,
    once we settled I would then remover the buoy and tie a longer line that will sink and bring the line back to the bow .
    In that way , no one can pick our line up by mistake or get their propellor caught on it and if we should need it to release the anchor it's on our bow really to be used .
    I don't see any point leaving an buoy floating .
    I have been told by a few that the buoy marks there anchor so other don't sit on it , it doesn't matter if someone sit on it or not it's not going to affect your anchor . Just imagine if everyone deployed an buoy .

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
    Posts
    6,180

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by sailaboutvic View Post
    I am sure we talked about this in the pass .
    Anyway if I feel the need to use an another buoy ( i.e. An tripping line ) , we would lay one the normal way except ,
    once we settled I would then remover the buoy and tie a longer line that will sink and bring the line back to the bow .
    In that way , no one can pick our line up by mistake or get their propellor caught on it and if we should need it to release the anchor it's on our bow really to be used .
    I don't see any point leaving an buoy floating .
    I have been told by a few that the buoy marks there anchor so other don't sit on it , it doesn't matter if someone sit on it or not it's not going to affect your anchor . Just imagine if everyone deployed an buoy .
    Have used a similar ploy but circumstances dictate the approach taken.
    If in doubt - shoot the messenger!🇵🇹
    http://lagosnavigators.freeforums.org/index.php

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ Evia Island
    Posts
    7,123

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Re the anchor Buoy
    Often when coming into an anchorage in light winds you find most of the boats all swung the correct way, but you know very well that they are probably lying to their chain where it touches the bottom. This therefore makes it very difficult to know in a crowded anchorage where to put your hook.

    The anchor buoy would solve this issue - but you may choose the wrong buoy! AND the issues around obstruction with the buoy in my view trumps their use in 90% of circumstances - follow Vics plans on foul bottoms.

    So there are a number of things that can be done here to help both for you and the newcomer. Endeavour to know where your anchor is: (In clear water) paint your anchor white - you will often find you can see it when drifting around. You can therefore help the newcomer by telling him where it is. This pro-active approach will help avoid clashes later...... Always offer advice on how much chain YOU have out (nicely) and where you think your anchor is if drifting.

    With some anchor dragging apps it is probably possible, if you press the button on when the anchor hits the ground, know exactly where it is - but that is rather more boring to work out how to do it - once done it could just become a procedure on anchoring. I think I am rather too lazy to do this!

    In 6 years I have only used an anchor buoy once, in porto Rafiti when I was at anchor for several days. It was used as the pin end of the local Optimist starting line - for the training and selection of the young Greek Olympic hopefuls. A very entertaining week.....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Durham
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Many thanks to you all for the feedback on this, it gives me confidence that I am doing the right thing.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
    Posts
    2,676

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Robb View Post
    With some anchor dragging apps it is probably possible, if you press the button on when the anchor hits the ground, know exactly where it is - but that is rather more boring to work out how to do it - once done it could just become a procedure on anchoring. I think I am rather too lazy to do this!
    You need to allow for the position of the GPS antennae, but you can work out the position of the anchor using the chart plotter trace. The anchor drop point is usually obvious and it is surprisingly accurate.

    I sometimes dive on my anchor in quite murky water where the bottom cannot be seen from the surface. With some help from the GPS I can usually pinpoint the position of the anchor to a few metres.

    This is also very helpful, especially in light variable wind, when I can estimate if a boat new to the anchorage is dropping their anchor close to ours. Conflicts with boats swinging into other boats are rare, but the most common reason is when the two anchors are close together (and the scope is similar). In light wind the boats might start a reasonable distance from each other, but they will eventually become close.

    Knowing the position of your anchor is sometimes useful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ Evia Island
    Posts
    7,123

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    You need to allow for the position of the GPS antennae, but you can work out the position of the anchor using the chart plotter trace. The anchor drop point is usually obvious and it is surprisingly accurate.

    I sometimes dive on my anchor in quite murky water where the bottom cannot be seen from the surface. With some help from the GPS I can usually pinpoint the position of the anchor to a few metres.

    This is also very helpful, especially in light variable wind, when I can estimate if a boat new to the anchorage is dropping their anchor close to ours. Conflicts with boats swinging into other boats are rare, but the most common reason is when the two anchors are close together (and the scope is similar). In light wind the boats might start a reasonable distance from each other, but they will eventually become close.

    Knowing the position of your anchor is sometimes useful.
    I am one of those rare people who do not have a plotter!!!! I have been using a laptop with PC Plotter and a plug in GPS (Evermore GM R900) but since upgrading to Windows 10, I remain firmly based in Haslemere all the year round. (any ideas?). Using in the mean time Navionics on my Samsung S5 (waterproof) - which works very well in the context of simple med eyeball navigation - and yes it has a track so that could be even easier as its always on.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
    Posts
    2,676

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Robb View Post
    I am one of those rare people who do not have a plotter!!!! I have been using a laptop with PC Plotter and a plug in GPS (Evermore GM R900) but since upgrading to Windows 10, I remain firmly based in Haslemere all the year round. (any ideas?). Using in the mean time Navionics on my Samsung S5 (waterproof) - which works very well in the context of simple med eyeball navigation - and yes it has a track so that could be even easier as its always on.
    Anything with a plotter function should work well so the PC or the Samsung should be fine. The trick is get the true anchor position (providing you have an anchor that sets quickly) is to displace the drop point by the distance (and direction) between the gps antennae and the bow.

    This is easy to do, but difficult to explain. This diagram (assuming the antennae is near the stern) might help. The cross shows the correct anchor position:


  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ Evia Island
    Posts
    7,123

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    Anything with a plotter function should work well so the PC or the Samsung should be fine. The trick is get the true anchor position (providing you have an anchor that sets quickly) is to displace the drop point by the distance (and direction) between the gps antennae and the bow.

    This is easy to do, but difficult to explain. This diagram (assuming the antennae is near the stern) might help. The cross shows the correct anchor position:

    Thanks. Useful overview

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