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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Carribbean currently Grenada
    Posts
    5,835

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Gosh you guys are making this complicated. I know how much chain I have out say X.

    Assuming we do not have a strong current and we do have a reasonable wind, for 360 days this is usual my bow is pointing at the anchor.

    So the anchor is X distance off the bow inline with the boat.
    Monkey patching programmer [retired ]

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ YAT marine Marmaris
    Posts
    7,070

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by TQA View Post
    Gosh you guys are making this complicated. I know how much chain I have out say X.

    Assuming we do not have a strong current and we do have a reasonable wind, for 360 days this is usual my bow is pointing at the anchor.

    So the anchor is X distance off the bow inline with the boat.
    Just to remind you. I said Mediterranean. Your method would just not work here.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopefully somewhere warm
    Posts
    6,167

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    Anything with a plotter function should work well so the PC or the Samsung should be fine. The trick is get the true anchor position (providing you have an anchor that sets quickly) is to displace the drop point by the distance (and direction) between the gps antennae and the bow.

    This is easy to do, but difficult to explain. This diagram (assuming the antennae is near the stern) might help. The cross shows the correct anchor position:

    Excellent idea and dead easy on Opencpn, mouse on waypoint then just put distance and bearing into anchor Pro rather than going up to the bow and try to guess the chain length if there was no catinery, ta for sharing.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Summer Walton, Winter Iberia
    Posts
    5,724

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    The way this thread is heading is this a bit of Fred Drift or intentional anchor drag?
    If in doubt - shoot the messenger!
    Play the Man - Not The Ball.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ YAT marine Marmaris
    Posts
    7,070

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by nortada View Post
    The way this thread is heading is this a bit of Fred Drift or intentional anchor drag?
    Unless it gets caught on some ground chain

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    On board Rampage.
    Posts
    4,032

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Robb View Post
    Just to remind you. I said Mediterranean. Your method would just not work here.
    Well, I sail in the Med and that's how I sort out where my anchor is. Minor variation is that I don't usually set the anchor alarm unless the winds getting up, so I'll know what direction the anchor lies in.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Back in the Caribbean for 2017
    Posts
    1,986

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by TQA View Post
    Assuming we do not have a strong current and we do have a reasonable wind...my bow is pointing at the anchor. So the anchor is X distance off the bow inline with the boat.
    Except for the Murican anchors: Not quite so prevalent here in the Caribbean as we found in their home waters, which apparently includes the Bahamas, but the North American boats do not like anyone 'sitting over my anchor'. We've come to realise that this actually translates into English as: 'Anywhere ahead of where I am'. I've now lost count of the number of times that we've heard an American skipper say that he's sitting to lets say 100' of rode, but is adamant that the spot into which the next boat settles, which might well be 200' and 45 degrees off his bow is apparently 'sitting over my anchor'. This problem's often exacerbated by their use Octopus-Anchors, which have a nasty habit of scuttling across the seabed: Thus when the original 'idiot' who was sitting on his anchor has moved elsewhere and another 'asshole' arrives and settles in 200'/45-degs off his opposite bow, the anchor is quite likely have moved there in the meanwhile, leading to another round of abuse.
    Our record on a direct level was in Long Island Sound when a chap dinghied over (we'd been unable to understand his message, even when shouted) in 25-30 knot winds and pouring rain to advise us that we were sitting 'right on my anchor', our estimate was that we were around 60 degrees and 200-250' off his starboard bow!
    I chose the road less travelled, now where the hell am I?

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    UK, Greece and Spain
    Posts
    15,659

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Invariably when I wake up in the morning in an anchorage in Greece when there is little or no wind I am right over my anchor, sometimes can actually see it from the boat.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Living on dirt waiting for our new yacht to be built.
    Posts
    2,532

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by duncan99210 View Post
    Well, I sail in the Med and that's how I sort out where my anchor is. Minor variation is that I don't usually set the anchor alarm unless the winds getting up, so I'll know what direction the anchor lies in.
    I think that knowing where your anchor is located is useful information, but I am a bit puzzled why this prevents you setting an anchor alarm. Occasionally anchor drags can occur in quite light wind and the anchor alarm serves as an extra crew member that is constantly checking on your position. This is good insurance.

    Ideally the anchor alarm should be centred directly over the anchor and therefore will also give the distance and bearing to the anchor. This way, as the wind changes direction, the distance to the anchor stays constant. You can therefore set the alarm at only a slightly greater distance than the amount of rode you have out and the alarm will go off if the anchor moves, but not produce a false alarm even if the wind swings 180.

    There are some variations on the above. You can deliberately offset the alarm so that if wind changes direction significantly the alarm sounds even if the anchor is not dragging. This can sometimes be useful if, for example, there is another boat is lying at two anchors that presents a collision risk if a change in wind direction occurs. However, most of the time our anchor alarm is set to sound only if the anchor drags.

    Unfortunately, some chart plotters only have an anchor alarm that can be activated from the current location, which is much less versatile. Sometimes there is a work around this problem, but many simply resort to a tablet, smartphone or PC which surprisingly often have better anchor alarms than the purpose designed marine chart plotters.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Home UK Midlands / Boat Croatia
    Posts
    11,312

    Default Re: Anchoring rights

    Quote Originally Posted by jordanbasset View Post
    Invariably when I wake up in the morning in an anchorage in Greece when there is little or no wind I am right over my anchor, sometimes can actually see it from the boat.
    In Croatia when I get up in the morning the first thing I do is put the kettle on .... and the second thing is to pop outside and have a look at my anchor on the seabed. If I can't see it I'm disappointed but that has only happened a handful of times in the last 10 years.

    Richard

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