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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Falmouth
    Posts
    1,102

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by Tranona View Post
    ...You will need a minimum of 1000w ...
    One probably will have difficulty finding a smaller and less powerful windlass, but 1000W is really rather more than is actually required. A human, who is very very fit, and has an ideal coupling into the device - say a rowing machine - can output a bit under 800W for a few tens of seconds. Someone on a manual windlass is putting about 350W into the windlass when it's nearly causing a heart-attack. So something which can do 400W continuously will be absolutely fine.

    I had reason to test this recently as my windlass motor failed while I was far from anywhere where one could obtain spares. I adapted a cordless electric screwdriver, capable of about 280W, in its place, and it was fine. Plenty of power and torque and a great deal faster than I could do over the time it took to raise 50m of chain in a gale. My boat is 12.8m LOA and a heavy cruiser with 10mm chain and a 25kg anchor.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5,795

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    That's good PBO stuff.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    3,105

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by jdc View Post
    One probably will have difficulty finding a smaller and less powerful windlass, but 1000W is really rather more than is actually required. A human, who is very very fit, and has an ideal coupling into the device - say a rowing machine - can output a bit under 800W for a few tens of seconds. Someone on a manual windlass is putting about 350W into the windlass when it's nearly causing a heart-attack. So something which can do 400W continuously will be absolutely fine.


    I had reason to test this recently as my windlass motor failed while I was far from anywhere where one could obtain spares. I adapted a cordless electric screwdriver, capable of about 280W, in its place, and it was fine. Plenty of power and torque and a great deal faster than I could do over the time it took to raise 50m of chain in a gale. My boat is 12.8m LOA and a heavy cruiser with 10mm chain and a 25kg anchor.
    The OP has not declared what size nor length of chain he intends to carry nor weight of anchor. I like your maths but in a worst case scenario you might have all your chain deployed, or more likely deploying by accident. We don't know how much chain the OP has but with a windlass he has the option to increase length, as retrieval is going to be easier. I would not want to be retrieving a long length of 10mm (nor 8mm) chain by hand, winch handle in windlass. I'm not sure that I'd want to try a 400 watt motor either to retrieve that long length. The idea of the larger motor is to cater for worst case scenario as a slightly larger motor is commonly not a major increase in price and windlass can usually take a range of motors, as the fittings are identical.

    When we bought our Maxwell we specifically chose to have the larger motor, 1,000 watt, we have 75m of 6mm, as this minimises the load on the motor and wiring.

    Jonathan

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    1,726

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Our 19 tonne boat has 60 metres of chain, 50 metres of anchorplait and a 33kg anchor attached. The original windlass installed on the boat was a Lofrans Falkon. The motor was 2kw. The windlass was in place for over 30 years from what I can tell. We decided to replace it due to corrosion of the case as it had been installed on a teak pad that helped to accelerate corrosion in the base. We installed a new Lofrans Falkon that now comes with a 1.7kw motor. Being on top of the job has its advantages. The motor and gearbox are not stressed and there is ample spare power for when you need it. There have been a couple of occasions when our Spade anchor is so well dug in that the windlass has pulled the bow of the boat down by a good foot! At that point I usually nudge the boat forward to break it out. Also if you are sailing alone and you need to lift the anchor, the windlass is powerful enough to pull the boat up wind without and assistance from the engine. I can stand on the bow with the engine in neutral and watch the anchor come up.
    I would certainly not size a windlass for the minimum I can get away with, rather the biggest I can justify

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    3,105

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post

    I would certainly not size a windlass for the minimum I can get away with, rather the biggest I can justify
    +1

    Jonathan

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    South Coast
    Posts
    4,185

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by martinaskey View Post
    I had the same experience when I bought Rumbuster (36ft, wooden, 9te). Only 8mm chain and hauling up the anchor is all part of the classic boat experience isn't it ? (it was on the previous boat - a Folkboat). A year or so of pulling up the chain lead to the fitting of a Quick electric windlass and the crew have been extremely pleased with it ! Quick were at the cheaper end of the range but it is compact and has been reliable. Went for 1000W vertical arrangement and it is more than powerful enough.
    Martin
    Is that the same Rumbuster as previously owned By Admiral David Williams in the late 1980's ? What a lovely boat you have. She was kept at Hornet (JSSC) where we kept HMS Sultan's boats on adjacent pontoons.
    Corvette Motorboat Association www.corvettemotorboat.wordpress.com

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    3,094

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    A couple of years ago I fitted one of these

    http://boatgeardirect.co.uk/windlass...tical-windlass

    It was simple to fit, the only debate was on siting, cable runs etc. Also considerably less costly than the big name stuff
    Tax stupidity, not intelligence

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    29,093

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    +1

    Jonathan
    Another +1. Makes no sense to underspecify. The 1000W version of the Cayman for example is physically the same as the 700W and only 30 more in money. Similar with other models.

    The whole point of fitting an electric windlass is to make life easier in all conditions.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    3,105

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by Tranona View Post
    Another +1. Makes no sense to underspecify. The 1000W version of the Cayman for example is physically the same as the 700W and only 30 more in money. Similar with other models.

    The whole point of fitting an electric windlass is to make life easier in all conditions.
    Make you wonder who would buy the 700W model and why.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    16,861

    Default Re: Electric windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    Make you wonder who would buy the 700W model and why.
    I believe that there are still people sailing around in small boats.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

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