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Thread: Linux at sea

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    387

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    Quote Originally Posted by Playtime View Post
    Might even get a Raspberry Pi to play with.
    If you do use a RPi make sure you get a good power supply to it. I think I destroyed mine by too low a voltage thru' a cheap, Chinese 12v to USB converter. (laptop to the rescue).

    GHA was very helpful in helping me set up mine too. My last coding (apart from copy and paste some php) was with BASIC on a teleprinter terminal at school. And we knew more than the teachers! So I think you'll be ok. There are lots of support forums out there. The only thing I couldn't get to work was the AIS dongle.

    Incidentally, I find that my old Thinkpad, completely shut off from the world, and with no protection software etc, running on XP, works well (dedicated) with Open CPN and VMH charts at about the same power takeup as the RPi. The difference is that I have to wake the laptop up but that only takes a few seconds.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    marinetraffic.com MMSI 235116115
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    467

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    I hope this thread isn't going to die - it's of great interest to me. Over on the motorboat forum a number of people are experimenting with Linux for boat PCs, with additional motivation due to Windows 10.

    My contribution is unfortunately a negative which is that I asked Visit My Harbour (of which I am a paid member) whether there is any way of running their raster charts on Linux, and the answer is No. Therefore the OP's reference to Admiralty charts is very relevant. Has anyone actually bought the S63 licence from O-Charts, bought an Admiralty vector chart, and successfully run it in OpenCPN with Linux as the OS?

    I agree the Admiralty S63 vector charts seem reasonably priced, but no way are they as cheap as the VMH chart stick. Probably doesn't matter for people who cruise in a fairly tight area but for anyone who wanders around all over the UK the cost of buying individual raster charts soon adds up.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Hopefully somewhere warm
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    7,084

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHooter View Post
    I hope this thread isn't going to die - it's of great interest to me. Over on the motorboat forum a number of people are experimenting with Linux for boat PCs, with additional motivation due to Windows 10.

    My contribution is unfortunately a negative which is that I asked Visit My Harbour (of which I am a paid member) whether there is any way of running their raster charts on Linux, and the answer is No. Therefore the OP's reference to Admiralty charts is very relevant. Has anyone actually bought the S63 licence from O-Charts, bought an Admiralty vector chart, and successfully run it in OpenCPN with Linux as the OS?

    I agree the Admiralty S63 vector charts seem reasonably priced, but no way are they as cheap as the VMH chart stick. Probably doesn't matter for people who cruise in a fairly tight area but for anyone who wanders around all over the UK the cost of buying individual raster charts soon adds up.
    Not s63 but I've bought oeSENC charts which ran fine on opencpn on a raspberry pi.
    http://o-charts.org/shop/index.php?i...gory&id_lang=4

    22,20 € for UK waters with a years updates.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Portsmouth
    Posts
    1,144

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    I have run the O-Charts (Admiralty vector) on my old Windows laptop. They work OK but the whole system was grinding exceeding slow, hence my interest in Linux. I have no reason to believe that they won't run in Linux but can't check this without buying a new licence; my current licence only works with the Win10 laptop.

    Regarding RPi3 - it's on my Christmas list for Santa so I may have more to report in the new year. I have managed to get AIS and instruments running on Linux (on the laptop) with OpenCPN, which is progress but haven't experimented further with NodeRed yet.
    Last edited by Playtime; 08-12-17 at 14:29.
    ------------------------------------
    Loves sailing, hates gardening

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    marinetraffic.com MMSI 235116115
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    467

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    Quote Originally Posted by GHA View Post
    Not s63 but I've bought oeSENC charts which ran fine on opencpn on a raspberry pi.
    http://o-charts.org/shop/index.php?i...gory&id_lang=4 22,20 € for UK waters with a years updates.
    Hope you don't think I'm splitting hairs - that's a vector chart you are linking to.
    I am looking for raster charts that will run in OpenCPN on Linux.
    I've nothing against vector charts. My plan is to have two screens, one displaying vector and the other raster charts.
    Hurricane from the Motorboat forum has raster charts for OpenCPN running on Linux, but the charts are not up to date and as already mentioned the VMH raster stick won't run on Linux.

  6. #16
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    Jun 2013
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    Default Re: Linux at sea

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHooter View Post
    Hope you don't think I'm splitting hairs - that's a vector chart you are linking to.
    I am looking for raster charts that will run in OpenCPN on Linux.
    I've nothing against vector charts. My plan is to have two screens, one displaying vector and the other raster charts.
    Hurricane from the Motorboat forum has raster charts for OpenCPN running on Linux, but the charts are not up to date and as already mentioned the VMH raster stick won't run on Linux.
    Ah, sorry , missed the bit about raster. Never really used them. Slight thread drift but google map satellite images can be really useful as well, easily created the https://www.venturefarther.com/ website or plugin.
    I haven't come across any raster charts for linux on opencpn.

    There is a convoluted way to create raster images from the google earth links on the VMH site using GE2KAP, but a bit long winded for anything more than a small area.


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Sant Carles de la Ràpita
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    6,167

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    TwoHooter has just emailed me about this thread.
    I am one of the people over on the Motorboat Forum who is going through this Windows to Linux process at the moment.
    He and I have spent a good few hours working on a suitable Windows replacement.

    I posted a fun thread earlier this year - using Raspberry Pi as a plotter etc.
    http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread...or-under-%A360
    Although it works, as a pure plotter, the RPi isn't really fast enough.
    However as interfacing hardware, I'm sure it would be most appropriate.

    I have to declare that I'm not really interested in Navtex - I have an old NASA Navtex engine that I used 9/10 years ago when we first commissioned our boat but I removed it about 5 years ago - it is somewhere in my box of bits.
    Being a mobo, we are mostly near to 3/4G data services so anything Navtex could offer has really been superseded.

    That said, I am a firm believer in the "ships PC".
    To date that has always been a Windows PC - initially running Memory Map software but over the last 5 or 6 years, OpenCPN has been terrific.
    OpenCPN's AIS display is "second to none".

    Our boat is a Princess 67 flybridge motor boat.
    The nav system consists of a Raymarine G Series Glass bridge network.
    4 monitors - 2 at each helm station.
    The main nav is Raymarine using Navionics charts but each of the monitors can switch to a number of different video feeds at the single press of a button.
    One such button displays the video output of the ship's PC.
    On longer passages, we run both the Raymarine and the PC (OpenCPN) at the same time - usually Raymarine on one screen and OpenCPN on the other.
    There are 3 GPS receivers feeding into the system so, having two independent systems backing each other up allows us to "fiddle" with one whilst leaving the other "navigating".
    The 3rd GPS is fed to a "logging" program that "speaks" SOG, COG, LON, LAT and time etc every half hour - we decided not to have a print out of this data as it instils a discipline on the helm - the crew on watch have to write down the data that is "spoken" from the PC. I wrote this logging system as a bit of a laugh but it has become a serious addition to our longer passages.

    I georeference my own charts.
    The Navionics charts under Raymarine form my main nav system so my own "self generated" charts are in addition and not so critical.
    That said, I have managed to create very accurate charts.
    I now have over 2000 charts that I've acquired or self generated over the years.
    If anyone is interested, I can document the georeferencing process.

    Now to the OP's point.
    I don't want to upgrade any of my PC systems to W10.
    I have friends who have had problems with W10 that would be completely unacceptable if they happened on my ships PC.
    To date, I have stuck firmly with W7 but about 2 years ago, I set myself the task of finding a W7 replacement within 4 years.
    That means I am now halfway through my search/research.
    I really want a system that has all the "feel" of W7 but will continue to be developed (new hardware as it comes up etc)
    There are three of us in Sant Carles (our marina in the Med) with the same aims and with similar PCs.
    At the moment, we are moving in the Linux Mint XFCE direction.
    For those who don't know, XFCE is one of the Mint project's desktop GUI options - Mint is a fork from Ubuntu and Ubuntu is a fork from Debian - etc.
    This Linux Mint with the XFCE GUI has a very good Windows feel to it and with a few bespoke changes, I have got it where I want it.
    I didn't like XFCE's file manager (Thunar) but the Mint Cinnamon file manager (Nemo) works well for me.
    OpenCPN just works - all my charts work - the Actisense interfaces (NMEA to USB) work.
    I even have my "talking" logger running under Wine.
    So there is no reason why we shouldn't UPGRADE to Linux.
    In fact 2 of the three of us in Sant Carles are doing just that.
    I'm being a little more cautious time is "marching on" - maybe another winter of testing during the cold evenings will do it for me.
    That said, I will be converting my home server to Linux very soon.
    And I already have an Linux computer dedicated as an internet server on the outside of my LAN.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Durham, England
    Posts
    14,685

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    I don't know enough, to give advice; but I do know I have Seaclear running on my little Asus laptop under Linux, with CM93 charts. I have my Garmin GPS72 connected, as well as a Navman B10 Bluetooth GPS. I took me ages to get it all working, but it does all work just fine.

    snapshot8.png
    Last edited by elton; 08-12-17 at 13:08.
    Cleverer than brain pie

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brighton
    Posts
    4,082

    Default Re: Linux at sea

    I've got OpenCPN with the oeSENC charts for British Isles and France Atlantic on ubuntu 16.04 on a Dell xps13. TBH I don't use it for navigation: I do that with paper charts and pencils. I have openCPN for occasional bits of hacking and frankly was bored of looking at the base map. It seems to work fine.

    Note of course that there's plenty of things you might still want windows for. The electronic version of Reeds used to run on Adobe air (does it still?) which was briefly supported on linux but never really worked (and then adobe dropped linux support). The chart updater for navionics cards for plotters only used to work on mac or windows. The software for configuring SRT-based AIS units used to be windows only (but looked simple enough for wine). I wouldn't be surprised if there was plenty of configuration software for marine devices which is windows-only

  10. #20
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    Sep 2014
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    marinetraffic.com MMSI 235116115
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    Default Re: Linux at sea

    Quote Originally Posted by laika View Post
    I wouldn't be surprised if there was plenty of configuration software for marine devices which is windows-only
    I think that's right. But when you look at how much progress has been made with OpenCPN, and how well it continues to be developed and supported, and how well it works in Linux, it's easy to hope that as time goes by more things will be incorporated either by having an OpenCPN equivalent or by running them in WINE. And if a boat's PC is running Linux it doesn't cost much to have a laptop or a tablet for the things that Linux can't handle. I personally think there will be progress because Windows10 is causing problems for so many people.

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