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Thread: Mast steps

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5,783

    Default Re: Mast steps

    After an "incident" with my Genoa furling gear, which involved several trips up the mast, at the back of beyond, I resolved to fit steps. I have never regretted fitting them.

    Re that drill adaptor thingy. From what I can make out on the description, they only take rivets up to 3/16". I used 1/4" for my steps, so it wouldn't have done for that. I have a side handle device from Faithful, which was fine. The mast was down though.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Lincoln
    Posts
    294

    Default Re: Mast steps

    The rivet adapter I have has four adapters for all normal sizes

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Gloucestershire
    Posts
    4,117

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Quote Originally Posted by Daverw View Post
    Climbing harness lot easier than bosun chair and more comfortable, also half the cost
    The only harness I have found that was comfortable to climb and sit in, cost £450 but you also needed another £200 for the chest part to stop you falling out backwards.

    The problem with bosun's chairs I have found, is that they can be ok to sit in but, the moment you stand, you slide forwards with predictable consequences of discomfort.

    The local climbing centre was sued three times successfully for DVT case and they were just on a climbing wall.

    I'd love to find an alternative.
    I'd rather be naked
    www.mastaclimba.com

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5,783

    Default Re: Mast steps

    My bosun's chair has thigh straps to stop me slipping forward on the seat. Do they not all?

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Lincoln
    Posts
    294

    Default Re: Mast steps

    As far as comfort is concerned neither are classed as comfortable that’s not there main function, the cost for normal climbing harness is about £35 to £90 from the main manufacturers of climbing gea. Fitted correctly chest harnes not needed as you should not be top heavy, climbers don’t tend to fall out when they fall on the rope. As far as DVT is concerned, how long are you planning to be up the mast? If the work is very extended then climbing up is probably not the best option.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    6,991

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    My bosun's chair has thigh straps to stop me slipping forward on the seat. Do they not all?
    Mine has a strap around the waist as well as the hoisting part plus a strap between the legs.Being tall, I still feel that I want to fall back, so I always tie a line to the halyard , pass it over my shoulder & back under the opposite arm. I then tie that end to the halyard with enough tension to allow me to lean outwards against it but still feeling safe.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Gloucestershire
    Posts
    4,117

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Quote Originally Posted by Daverw View Post
    As far as comfort is concerned neither are classed as comfortable that’s not there main function, the cost for normal climbing harness is about £35 to £90 from the main manufacturers of climbing gea. Fitted correctly chest harnes not needed as you should not be top heavy, climbers don’t tend to fall out when they fall on the rope. As far as DVT is concerned, how long are you planning to be up the mast? If the work is very extended then climbing up is probably not the best option.
    There are other, very popular, options!
    I'd rather be naked
    www.mastaclimba.com

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Here's a perfectly suitable harness for £35. https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/pe...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    If you are completely static in a harness you may get restrictions in blood supply to one or other leg. You can feel it as the leg 'going to sleep'. So, if you are hanging around (at the top of the mast for example) for some time, tie a loop of rope to the mast solely to enable you to take the leg weight off the harness constriction (a few seconds is long enough) every now and again. No problem.

    You don't need a chest harness. I use a loop of tape on my chest jammer that goes round the back of my neck. it doesn't carry any weight, only keeps the croll in an upright position. It has a buckle so it can be shortened once there is weight on the croll otherwise it flops down.
    Last edited by Poey50; 08-12-17 at 01:03.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    6,991

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Quote Originally Posted by Poey50 View Post
    Here's a perfectly suitable harness for £35. https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/pe...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    If you are completely static in a harness you may get restrictions in blood supply to one or other leg. You can feel it as the leg 'going to sleep'. So, if you are hanging around (at the top of the mast for example) for some time, tie a loop of rope to the mast solely to enable you to take the leg weight off the harness constriction (a few seconds is long enough) every now and again. No problem.
    With all due respect- I do not think that is practical. Have you tried tying a loop to a slippery aluminium mast. Ok if you have something for the loop to catch on but it will just slip if you are trying to get it to grip the mast itself I am sure. Similarly if one is working out on the spreader tips one does not normally want to put loops onto the spreaders & put weight there.
    As for the harness itself- I fully admit that I have never tried climbing- but I assume ( & we all know what assumption is!!) that climbers are not normally hoisted up but climb. Hence they do not have weight applied to the harness. In the majority of cases the rigger is hoisted & his/her full weight is/would be applied to the leg straps from the word go. Somehow I would not like that. Different if using steps or certain climbing systems of course.
    My bosuns chair was one used on one of my son's contracts where some abseilers were drafted in to work on some curtain walling where the scaffold had been removed. It is just that, a standard bosuns chair. They specified those because they had to sit in them all day long.
    I would be interested to see what window cleaners use when cleaning from heights.
    The Spinnlock harness is often used on racing boats & the person is hoisted aloft but they are fit & it is for things like releasing spinnaker pole ends or sorting emergencies out. I am not sure they use them out of choice for long term use. I tried one at a boat show & soon rejected it.
    One further point is that on building sites personel working at heights often have to wear full safety harnesses. These are not just that sort we are looking at here but full body patterns. According to training lessons the average time for survival if suspended in one before blood restriction can cause heart attack is 20 minutes.
    I would ask ( because I do not know)-if the blood flow is restricted to the legs could it cause a blood rush when the body is released. Would the medical fraternity confirm if this can cause problems to the heart.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Gloucestershire
    Posts
    4,117

    Default Re: Mast steps

    Quote Originally Posted by Poey50 View Post
    Here's a perfectly suitable harness for £35. https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/pe...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    If you are completely static in a harness you may get restrictions in blood supply to one or other leg. You can feel it as the leg 'going to sleep'. So, if you are hanging around (at the top of the mast for example) for some time, tie a loop of rope to the mast solely to enable you to take the leg weight off the harness constriction (a few seconds is long enough) every now and again. No problem.
    That is a good reason for something solid to stand on - like mast steps. Even I () have a couple of steps at the mast head installed before I came up with something else.

    You don't need a chest harness. I use a loop of tape on my chest jammer that goes round the back of my neck. it doesn't carry any weight, only keeps the croll in an upright position. It has a buckle so it can be shortened once there is weight on the croll otherwise it flops down.
    I disagree completely. My bosuns chair has shoulder straps and a chest strap. But I also wear a full fall arrest harness separately attached to a safety line. I have seen videos of people falling backwards when just using a climbing harness. You need to remember that not everyone who climbs masts is a youthful athlete!
    I'd rather be naked
    www.mastaclimba.com

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