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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat: Portsmouth, Us: Stewkley
    Posts
    2,866

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    I've just popped a dehumidifier on the boat as it's now in a marina for the Winter. Always do.

    It was running in the lounge (damp cottage) until a week ago. I didn't check the house insurance before I turned it on!

    If it's dangerous why is it more dangerous unattended?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,201

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    One winter I left a fan heater (the kind that has a thermostat in it) unattended in the kitchen of our holiday home to avoid frozen pipes. Next time we visited we were greeted by a smell of burnt insulation and the charred remains of the heater in the middle of the kitchen floor. Fortunately the floor was stone-flagged and there was nothing inflammable nearby. I have no idea why it caught fire; it wasn't very old.

    Since then I won't leave any electrical appliance with moving parts switched on and unattended. The only unavoidable exceptions are our fridge/freezer and the gas central heating boiler in our principal residence.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Brighton
    Posts
    3,483

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    Almost certainly the motor seized and the element overheated the casing and set it alight.
    Very common with nasty fan heaters.
    A friend very nearly lost his boat to one of these despite warnings!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    River Exe
    Posts
    10,937

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by CLB View Post
    Sorry, but ventilation is second best, a long way behind using a dehumidifier, for keeping a boat dry and damp free. Try one before you knock it.
    Born and brought up in the in the West Highlands, I beg to differ.
    Cynical Scots engineer.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1,555

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy View Post
    Born and brought up in the in the West Highlands, I beg to differ.
    Not sure what location has to do with anything, but feel free to carry on in ignorance.
    If found in the Brexit forum, please return to the real world.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    River Exe
    Posts
    10,937

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by CLB View Post
    Not sure what location has to do with anything, but feel free to carry on in ignorance.
    Considerable rainfall, damp winters and the experience of keeping things dry in such a climate, but feel free to use your dehumidifier.
    Cynical Scots engineer.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by lpdsn View Post
    There's something about yachtsman that makes some of them prone to inventing rules for themselves and trying to convince others to follow them. I've never come across it amongst any other group of people (except maybe local councillors). I've never had rules on de-humidifiers mentioned by any insurance company, and I read the small print. I've never heard of a claim being rejected because a de-humidifier was used. People make a fuss when insurance claims are rejected and it costs the insurance company business, even if they were in the right (q.v. Admiral about 15 years ago).

    In the end there are only a small number of infrequent incidents caused by de-humidifiers. Purely from what I've seen in the news, and given boating incidents are reported in mags, forums like this etc, I'd reckon you probably stand a bigger chance of your house blowing up with a gas leak than your boat being destroyed by fire caused by a de-humidifier.

    The definitive answer will only come from your insurance company. If you find the rules too stringent push back and tell them you're concerned they're obstructing you maintaining the condition of the boat and see what agreement you can get.

    That said I rarely leave one unattended for any length of time, mainly because I find leaving a de-humidifier on long term on a low setting seems to achieve a lot less than bursts on full setting backed up by a bit of heat.
    Hi Check this news article ... Its not just me is the chandlers said it also that they have stopped selling dehumidifiers because of it.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    I asked the same question of the chandler. they came back and said "would you leave your toaster on unattended" should be suitable for purpose. Actually its well known in domestic appliances that you are not supposed to leave a tumble dryer on unattended so what is the difference I guess. see http://www.pbo.co.uk/news/warning-to...-of-fires-1126

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    I love the idea of ventilation, but when the air humidity outside is 90% so will our bedding etc be, personally I prefer to have a dry cabin, so use a dehumidifier.

    Ventilation was great in the days when we took all fabric cushions etc home for the winter, now we don't do that.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Swing mooring Faro
    Posts
    5,189

    Default Re: No Insurance Cover Dehumidifiers For Fire Risk on Boats?

    I agree with Sandy, ventilation is the priority. Using boats all year round for 24 years or so, have never felt the need for dehumidifier. Eberspacher blows any stale air out very successfully. As far as insurance claims are concerned, I've never heard of one being rejected but, if an insurer really wanted to be picky, they could always claim that using something clearly against the makers instructions could be deemed negligence. As others have said, best bet is to ask insurers (in writing) if covered.

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