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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    7,005

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian_Rob View Post
    May I persuade you to develop this now?
    You must be joking. _ I upset enough people as it is !!!!!
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Somewhere in the Solent
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    So does that mean that your chute has a straight luff & is rigged with it tight or do you fly it free when set? I ask because I binned my snuffer after the first couple of goes as it is the work of the devil & i wonder if the sail could be furled on a continuous line furler with a torque line but with the sail allowed to fly free in use
    It's not rigged tight with a straight luff, it flies free.

    Furling isn't a big deal, although it does take a bit of effort as the GX-15 furler isn't a huge diameter drum. Once you've got the first few turns in it's not an issue. I didn't entertain the snuffer idea as i knew it'd more hassle than the furler. Each to their own etc.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    28,475

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelleSerene View Post
    I do the same - just with a low-friction ring soft-shackled to a shackle at the forward end of a bow roller.

    Yes, beware a cruising chute that's too large for the boat. You should be able to take the luff reasonably tight if you tack it right down to the bow, otherwise the thing will too easily overpower the boat, and the higher on the wind you go, the more its inclination to broach. The tack is its taming line, and if there's a lot of twist in the luff with the tack fully on, you're intro trouble territory.

    One thing I did a few years ago, having ordered too large a cruising chute myself because of a mis-quoted 'i' sail measurement, was to raise the spectacle on the mast above the fractional forestay and genoa head, through which the chute's halyard is reeved. This enabled us to stretch the chute's luff more tightly, as well as exposing more of its area to the breeze.

    I'm glad I did not buy a spinnaker instead though: a kite with a spinnaker pole is far more faff than an asymmetric with a good sock.
    People talking about straight luffs and furlers and all that, illustrates the variety of 'chutes'.
    Here's a 'proper one':
    http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/19...n#.Wik_Z9eWSUk
    See how the luff is rounded and 'inflated' to windward.

    Here is another extreme, a 'screecher':
    https://www.rclass.org/seasons/2009/...iew_fullscreen

    Most people may be looking for a compromise.


    Regarding proper kites being a faff, yes for sure, but as a cruiser, I'd only be looking to put one up on a leg of over 2 hours. For light airs systems can be simplified a bit and made less aggro than the full force racing set up. Obviously if you want to get it up in a short evening sail around the bay, it isn't ideal. Having got away with a few things racing, I do like a bit of sea-room when cruising with kites.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    402

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    You must be joking. _ I upset enough people as it is !!!!!
    Understood. No problem. Thankyou anyway.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Argyll
    Posts
    5,057

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    You must be joking. _ I upset enough people as it is !!!!!
    Surely not???? I read your post, thought it quite sensible and agreed with most of it sufficiently to feel no need to add anything before I looked to identify the author. You talk sense sometimes!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    7,005

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    deleted
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 07-12-17 at 19:16.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,455

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    People talking about straight luffs and furlers and all that, illustrates the variety of 'chutes'.
    Here's a 'proper one':
    http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/19...n#.Wik_Z9eWSUk
    See how the luff is rounded and 'inflated' to windward.

    Here is another extreme, a 'screecher':
    https://www.rclass.org/seasons/2009/...iew_fullscreen

    Most people may be looking for a compromise.


    Regarding proper kites being a faff, yes for sure, but as a cruiser, I'd only be looking to put one up on a leg of over 2 hours. For light airs systems can be simplified a bit and made less aggro than the full force racing set up. Obviously if you want to get it up in a short evening sail around the bay, it isn't ideal. Having got away with a few things racing, I do like a bit of sea-room when cruising with kites.
    Hey, I’m with you. Your first photo is of a racing yacht with a light-airs, deep-reaching asymmetric up. He’d be in trouble rounding up on the wind in that, but he knows it and won’t. He’ll have a tight-reaching sail for use further upwind. Whereas the OP, and by the sound of it you, and incidentally certainly I, can only afford one asymmetric sail which we need to be able to carry us up towards a beam reach in rising breeze without creating danger. So the guy with the great green dragon and ample bosom out front can manage without a straight luff, because he has other suits to change into and crew to make the change. The OP doesn’t.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    28,475

    Default Re: Cruising Chute, Gennaker and Bowsprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelleSerene View Post
    Hey, I’m with you. Your first photo is of a racing yacht with a light-airs, deep-reaching asymmetric up. He’d be in trouble rounding up on the wind in that, but he knows it and won’t. He’ll have a tight-reaching sail for use further upwind. Whereas the OP, and by the sound of it you, and incidentally certainly I, can only afford one asymmetric sail which we need to be able to carry us up towards a beam reach in rising breeze without creating danger. So the guy with the great green dragon and ample bosom out front can manage without a straight luff, because he has other suits to change into and crew to make the change. The OP doesn’t.
    The green sail is extreme, but a cruising chute for downwind work will have a fairly curved luff.
    A sail designed around tight reaching isn't that useful for shorthanded work, unless the basic problem is that the white sails are just far too small.
    The key in a good asy for getting downwind is that some of the area will set to windward of the boats c/l. That means a lot less net heeling moment, the bulk of the sail is pulling the boat forwards rather than over.
    Obviously if you want to reach higher, then you have to accept all the area being to leeward, you won't want so much area and you will be looking at a flatter sail. Tending towards a 'code zero'.

    There are a lot of cruising chutes out there which really are not very good for sailing low. Which is a shame if that's where the destination is, as happens a lot in coastal cruising.
    OTOH, a lot of cruising sailors seem happy with small (very low overlap) headsail for up wind, chute for across the wind and donkey for downwind.

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