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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Liverpool
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    363

    Default Rope selection for splicing

    The last two types of 3-strand mooring rope that I have tried to splice decided to fall apart once I separated the the three strands (i.e. the individual strands from each of the three strands straightened into a dozen or so separate strands) . Still managed to splice and eye into them but not as neat as previous attempts on my first spliced mooring rope. I have tried using hair spray and gel to hold them together but with little success. It would be better if they stayed together themselves.

    Can someone please advise as to how do you decide which rope is suitable for splicing befre it is bought?
    Enjoy your sailing,
    Jaguar 25

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    3,628

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Not had that problem, but perhaps you can try using a bit of tape on the ends of each of the three starnds until you're much further through making the splice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Liverpool
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    363

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Quote Originally Posted by lpdsn View Post
    Not had that problem, but perhaps you can try using a bit of tape on the ends of each of the three starnds until you're much further through making the splice.
    As a norm I always tape, burn or whip the ends. Could be just rubbish rope of course!
    Enjoy your sailing,
    Jaguar 25

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Deale, MD, USA
    Posts
    637

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Soak it in hair gel. Seriously, some riggers do this.

    Also, as others have said, tape the ends and tape or seize where the unlay stops. For most splices, it doesn't make any difference if the srtand turns to yarns. It will be just as stong and smoother. For a long splice or irony splice, maintain the twist with your fingers.
    Last edited by thinwater; 07-12-17 at 21:47.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    3,628

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar 25 View Post
    As a norm I always tape, burn or whip the ends. Could be just rubbish rope of course!
    I usually thin out the ends towards the end of the splice. When does it go wrong? I presume you have a fid of some sort to protect the ends when feeding them through the lay.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Just on the Clyde.
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    636

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    As said a bit of tape or a small cable tie to hold the 3 strands together until you get started.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,137

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Once the strands start to unlay you're unlikely to get them laid back tightly again.

    Synthetic rope, try cutting with a hot knife and then separate the three strands, obviously into just three separate parts still fused at each end. Then protect them from separating further by taping each end. Then use a fid to make the hole you push them through, aiming to avoid flattening the strand whilst pushing and pulling it through. On the other hand, don't make the hole so big that the rope cockles, ie a strand of the rope itself gets gets a twist in it.

    Generally the larger diameters of rope are more difficult to do. I've had problems doing nylon, polyester, polythene. Polypropylene is easier but rots in sunshine over a few years so I don't use that any more.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    10,774

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Obviously tape the ends but also, as you feed each strand through, twist the strand tight with its lay, but don't allow it to kink. Also make the 'hole' that you're feeding the strand through nice and large.
    I use a home made fid, made from a length of 15mm copper pipe.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Colchester, boat Tollesbury
    Posts
    1,015

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    Quote Originally Posted by lpdsn View Post
    Not had that problem, but perhaps you can try using a bit of tape on the ends of each of the three starnds until you're much further through making the splice.
    +1
    Apogee Sabre 27, Tollesbury
    Apogee =The highest point in the development of something.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    5,190

    Default Re: Rope selection for splicing

    I usually use a constrictor knot - quick and easy to tie, and secure. As you'll probably cut the end of the strands off when you've finished, a knot that's difficult to undo doesn't matter. The other technique I use is to melt the ends, as others have suggested; I do this if I think I might not trim the ends. I have been known to do both - tie the knot to hold the strand together while sealing the end.

    Lots of 3-strand rope will "fall apart" when the strands are separated - it's particularly true of the cheaper polypropylene rope (the cheap orange stuff that looks like it's made of twisted up plastic bags). But even good quality nylon rope can do it; the material is smooth and slippery, so it doesn't hang together; my good mooring lines are like that, and that is a good quality rope. However, even cheap and nasty rope has its uses. Being cheap doesn't mean it isn't strong enough; usually just that it doesn't look nice and probably won't last as long as a better quality line. Useful when a rope may have to be regarded as consumable, or where a particular property such as floating is required.

    PS, the nastiest stuff I ever spliced was certainly NOT cheap or low quality - it was very hard laid cotton rope impregnated with graphite, originally intended for use in belt drives in the heavy woollen industry. It certainly didn't fall apart when unlaid - the main problem was opening it enough to tuck the strands! I had to use a fid about18 inches long with a flat blade (the kind intended for wire splicing) to open it. What's worse was that my Dad had bought a collapsed coil, so before splicing it I had to untangle it! It made very good fixed mooring lines (our mooring had a bow anchor and stern lines to the harbour wall), though, and the graphite worked as a pretty good antifoulant and preservative. It was horrible stuff to work with, though!
    Last edited by AntarcticPilot; 08-12-17 at 15:17.

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