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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Henley on Thames
    Posts
    2,209

    Default Coal stoves & dampers

    I've had a rather nice cylindrical coal stove re-furbished - it's cast iron, and slightly larger than a Faversham stove. I'm going to install in my bawley yacht, and went to me local canal-boat chandlers today to get a flue pipe made up. I asked whether they could put a damper in at the base of the flue, & they said it was frowned upon because it's controlling the stove by restricting the flue, whereas controlling by the air inlets of the stove is much safer. This particular stove only has a flap for the ash at it's base, although I can see it is possible to leave this slightly open. Other friends have said a damper in the flue as a way of shutting down the fire is better. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Home: Kent. Boat: Chichester
    Posts
    42,136

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Restricting the flue could lead to fumes, containing carbon monoxide, leaking into the cabin!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cumbria; U.K.
    Posts
    3,143

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Vic is absolutely correct, a real No-No!!
    Further thought, I've seen a solid fuel stove with a pivoted air-inlet flap into the flue to reduce draught, say in windy conditions.
    Could that be what was suggested by friends?
    Last edited by earlybird; 02-01-18 at 20:21.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    1,466

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Quote Originally Posted by ianc1200 View Post
    I've had a rather nice cylindrical coal stove re-furbished - it's cast iron, and slightly larger than a Faversham stove. I'm going to install in my bawley yacht, and went to me local canal-boat chandlers today to get a flue pipe made up. I asked whether they could put a damper in at the base of the flue, & they said it was frowned upon because it's controlling the stove by restricting the flue, whereas controlling by the air inlets of the stove is much safer. This particular stove only has a flap for the ash at it's base, although I can see it is possible to leave this slightly open. Other friends have said a damper in the flue as a way of shutting down the fire is better. Any thoughts?
    Hi! I do not see any difference between a wood/coal stove in a boat versus a house. We have had one in our house for 25 years and it has a built in damper, just like all the other household ones i have seen. Ours is located within the stove just before the flue exit and restricts and extends the route of the exhaust just before it exits into the flue pipe. It does not shut fully. It is essential to get maximum efficiency. With the damper open as the fire heats up we first start to restrict the air inlet valve at the base of the stove (ours os controlled by a bimetalic strip) and once a good fire is underway we close the damper. This results in the burn getting hotter but the fire and flames reducing somewhat and the fuel lasts longer. It is very impressive when you get the conditions right. Without the damper far more heat just goes up the chimney. And yes, we have a co alarm at home too.

    Www.solocoastalsailing.co.uk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    32,676

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Quote Originally Posted by Plum View Post
    Hi! I do not see any difference between a wood/coal stove in a boat versus a house. We have had one in our house for 25 years and it has a built in damper, just like all the other household ones i have seen. Ours is located within the stove just before the flue exit and restricts and extends the route of the exhaust just before it exits into the flue pipe. It does not shut fully. It is essential to get maximum efficiency. With the damper open as the fire heats up we first start to restrict the air inlet valve at the base of the stove (ours os controlled by a bimetalic strip) and once a good fire is underway we close the damper. This results in the burn getting hotter but the fire and flames reducing somewhat and the fuel lasts longer. It is very impressive when you get the conditions right. Without the damper far more heat just goes up the chimney. And yes, we have a co alarm at home too.

    Www.solocoastalsailing.co.uk
    Most houses have a lot more ventilation than most boats. And taller chimneys. And a great deal more volume.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    273

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Quote Originally Posted by ianc1200 View Post
    I've had a rather nice cylindrical coal stove re-furbished - it's cast iron, and slightly larger than a Faversham stove. I'm going to install in my bawley yacht, and went to me local canal-boat chandlers today to get a flue pipe made up. I asked whether they could put a damper in at the base of the flue, & they said it was frowned upon because it's controlling the stove by restricting the flue, whereas controlling by the air inlets of the stove is much safer. This particular stove only has a flap for the ash at it's base, although I can see it is possible to leave this slightly open. Other friends have said a damper in the flue as a way of shutting down the fire is better. Any thoughts?
    Modifying your chimney can be dangerous and worse still potentially fatal. I can not just not see it being worth the risk.
    Ocqueteau 8.15,200hpNanni.
    Buster Sun R,25 hp outboard

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    19,654

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Dampers are smaller diameter than the flue on domestic stoves, even when fully closed the one's I've seen only close the outlet by 60%. However boats aren't houses, the flue on a boat will be very short and the draw up the flue/chimney will be much less than a domestic installation. Bear in mind that heat loss from the flue will also reduce the draw. I'm not conversant with boat installations but they might benefit from insulated/twin wall flue. I reckon the damper is probably a bad idea in short.
    If I'd wanted to live in a Banana Republic I'd have gone to South America.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Winter in Falmouth, summer on board Rampage.
    Posts
    4,855

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Another factor to bear in mind is that most dampers I've seen on stoves are fitted to the stove itself: in other words, the stove is designed from the get go to have a damper fitted. Fitting one onto a stove which is not designed for a damper is asking for trouble.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK - Solent region
    Posts
    35,534

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Quote Originally Posted by ianc1200 View Post
    I've had a rather nice cylindrical coal stove re-furbished - it's cast iron, and slightly larger than a Faversham stove. I'm going to install in my bawley yacht, and went to me local canal-boat chandlers today to get a flue pipe made up. I asked whether they could put a damper in at the base of the flue, & they said it was frowned upon because it's controlling the stove by restricting the flue, whereas controlling by the air inlets of the stove is much safer. This particular stove only has a flap for the ash at it's base, although I can see it is possible to leave this slightly open. Other friends have said a damper in the flue as a way of shutting down the fire is better. Any thoughts?
    Used to have a solid fuel stove/boiler (anthracite peas), which had a built in chimney 'damper'. This however, allowed air into the chimney just above the stove & acted more as a flow regulator when the wind at the top of the chimney gusted, eliminating sudden surges through the fuel bed. Sometimes a bit noisy when it flapped open/shut.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    6,335

    Default Re: Coal stoves & dampers

    Well this is very interesting.

    I had a boat with a coal stove and a damper in the flue for 28 years, and lived on board her through two English winters. I am still alive, and I have always recommended including a damper in the flue. To be precise, not the butterfly type but the slide type, which will not twiddle itself open in a gust and which cannot close the flue completely.

    I can see that closing the flue completely will mean that carbon monoxide will find its way into the cabin, but that is an extreme case.

    In my experience, the "draw" on a boat's flue can be very strong indeed, and one needs a means of moderating it.

    For what it's worth, I favour the H type head.
    Last edited by Minn; 03-01-18 at 16:40.

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