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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    4,484

    Default Re: Bubble tester testing?

    Quote Originally Posted by bikedaft View Post
    thanks. alas i have nothing that uses a small amount of gas eg a fridge. will use old hose to make a small leak eg pinhole. cheers (then i will put the new hose on stop panicking!)

    cheers
    I do mine with a burner on as low as possible, then slowly push the red button down.
    At the first sign of a bubble I release it. With too much gas flow, for too long I suppose it could burst the seal and release all the fluid.

    I then know that the tiny hole in the tester body, inside the sight glass is not gunged.
    For the sake of repeating this, if it is blocked, it will not show any bubbles when the red knob is pressed, giving the impression all is okay, even if you have a leak.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Sevenoaks, Triola at MDL Chatham Marina
    Posts
    922

    Default Re: Bubble tester testing?

    When I fitted my whole system, the bubble tester was helpful as it did quickly identify I had a leak post install. Every time I turn my gas on since then, as matter of course, I press my bubble tester and to give me peace of mind that a wedge oar in a locker has not lever a piece of copper out of true, or the union on the cooker has come loose where I pulled by cooker out, or the piece of flexible hose that joins the copper to the cooker hasn't been chewed by the dog! Its a one second test that gives peace of mind (and at that point, its more about that peace of mind rather than anything else as its been rock solid ever since the install). The video at the start of the below did focus my mind when I fitted it all out...

    Important to note that the bubble tester showed me the leak before the NASA gas detector or any other electrickery noted any gas... makes it worthy in my books.

    http://www.albinballad.co.uk/how-tos/fit-out-your-gas/

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Home: Kent. Boat: Chichester
    Posts
    42,360

    Default Re: Bubble tester testing?

    Quote Originally Posted by MagicalArmchair View Post
    When I fitted my whole system, the bubble tester was helpful as it did quickly identify I had a leak post install. Every time I turn my gas on since then, as matter of course, I press my bubble tester and to give me peace of mind that a wedge oar in a locker has not lever a piece of copper out of true, or the union on the cooker has come loose where I pulled by cooker out, or the piece of flexible hose that joins the copper to the cooker hasn't been chewed by the dog! Its a one second test that gives peace of mind (and at that point, its more about that peace of mind rather than anything else as its been rock solid ever since the install). The video at the start of the below did focus my mind when I fitted it all out...

    Important to note that the bubble tester showed me the leak before the NASA gas detector or any other electrickery noted any gas... makes it worthy in my books.

    http://www.albinballad.co.uk/how-tos/fit-out-your-gas/
    You should be holding the button down for a minute!

    C. Depress the red testing button as far as it will go and hold for about 60 seconds. Leaking
    bubbles may immediately appear in the sight glass (see fi gure 3) if there is any
    leakage in the system.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Sevenoaks, Triola at MDL Chatham Marina
    Posts
    922

    Default Re: Bubble tester testing?

    Quote Originally Posted by VicS View Post
    You should be holding the button down for a minute!

    C. Depress the red testing button as far as it will go and hold for about 60 seconds. Leaking
    bubbles may immediately appear in the sight glass (see fi gure 3) if there is any
    leakage in the system.
    I do hold it down for more than a second in reality.... not the full sixty though... d'oh. Better change my 'gas on' run book...!

    54520269.jpg

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    I Live near Cambridge and sail the wash and east coast
    Posts
    264

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Having known of a boat go up in Poole harbour where the Skipper lost his leg, LPG should be treated with respect. The boat belonged to Military and I know they have a principle of gas on at the bottle, light the stove, gas off at the bottle then turn the stove off when it goes out. That reduces the risk. It only takes a six percent mix in the bilge to have an explosive mixture.

    Being aware of the danger is just common sense.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    8,266

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    I reckon not, it's just introducing more potential leak points. If you open the solenoid valve only when you actually want to use the cooker, and if you turn off the cylinder when you're not on the boat, what's the danger? Posts in these forums seem to show that people are irrationally frightened of LPG; in reality it's quite safe as long as you're sensible. If you're not sensible, no extra gadgets will protect you from harm.
    Very true.😊

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    8,266

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Quote Originally Posted by colind3782 View Post
    I fitted a bubble tester because the surveyor (don't get me started!) listed it as a recommendation and, of course, the insurance company insisted on all the "recommendation" being completed. It's next to useless as, in the only position I can place it, it's hard to see and places a joint outside the gas locker. The boat needs another insurance survey this year so I'll have a chat with the (different) surveyor and see what he says.
    Get a different surveyor. I had my Mirage surveyed at purchase and no mention was made of the lack of a bubble tester.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Shropshire/Empuriabrava
    Posts
    2,600

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostlymoron View Post
    Get a different surveyor. I had my Mirage surveyed at purchase and no mention was made of the lack of a bubble tester.
    Easier said than done in Empuriabrava. If you can recommend one, I'd be grateful.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    33,702

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Quote Originally Posted by paulieraw View Post
    Having known of a boat go up in Poole harbour where the Skipper lost his leg, LPG should be treated with respect. The boat belonged to Military and I know they have a principle of gas on at the bottle, light the stove, gas off at the bottle then turn the stove off when it goes out. That reduces the risk. It only takes a six percent mix in the bilge to have an explosive mixture.

    Being aware of the danger is just common sense.
    I imagine you're referring to the Lord Trenchard explosion. If you've read the report on it, you'd know that (a) the connection to the gas bottle hadn't been properly tightened, (b) the gas locker wasn't gas-tight as it should have been, and (c) the crew detected a smell of gas in the gas locker the previous night and did nothing to investigate it.

    There's no mention in the report of your belief that the crew would only turn the gas on at the bottle when they needed it, and turn it off at the bottle immediately after using the cooker. If they had followed that regime, the explosion probably wouldn't have happened.

    You mention common sense; if the crew had used a bit more common sense, the explosion wouldn't have happened. LPG on boats is intrinsically safe if you're sensible.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
    Posts
    6,442

    Default Re: LPG Bubble Tester essential?

    Quote Originally Posted by paulieraw View Post
    gas off at the bottle then turn the stove off when it goes out. That reduces the risk. It only takes a six percent mix in the bilge to have an explosive mixture.
    What's the point of turning the gas off at the bottle first? How many cc of gas do you think would make the difference between the gas in the supply pipe being at full pressure and it being it at atmospherical pressure, and how many cc would it take to give a 6% mix in the bilge?

    I suspect that there would be a greater danger from the procedure you suggest because it would be easy to forget to turn the appliance off once it had gone out, with the risk of much more gas escaping when the supply is turned on again.

    You are also likely to have more gas than otherwise going adrift while you are trying to light a burner if some air has previously got into the unpressurised system while you're on your way back from turning off the bottle.

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