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Thread: Anchor lighting

  1. #51
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    Apr 2006
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    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham376 View Post
    Personally, I would like to see masthead anchor lights banned, virtually impossible to judge distance away even when they're not lost in shore lights. We use the Dusk to Dawn anchor light which as well as 360 degree ones has some downlighting leds which light up quite a bit of the fore deck so boat can be seen from any angle of approach. https://boatlamps.co.uk/products/dus...nt=21259016775
    I totally disagree. A good masthead light with a bright deck level light works very well. Not everybody is anchoring with a town as a backdrop.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    3,395

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    I think anchor lights suspended a few metres up and preferably illuminating the superstructure are much more effective than a light at the top of the mast.

    On my old boat I experimented with a light in foretriangle, but felt the obscured angle towards the rear was little too great for comfort. However, I anchor well over 300 nights a year often not in recognised anchorages so I am probably overly sensitive to risk of a collision at night while at anchor.

    On my new yacht I have installed what I think is arguably the best solution. The top of the mast has an approved legal marine anchor light that is always on. This ensures that the boat complies with all the legal and insurance requirements. However, I also have a number of deck light options. Normally I leave one of these on overnight as a supplement.

    LED spreader lights or a deck light (often combined with the steaming light) are an OK solution. I occasionally use these, but I have some down lights that are installed on the solar arch that don’t interfere with forward night vision and light up the boat very effectively, especially from the rear where an inattentive boat is most likely to be approaching. As the boat is a pilothouse design, the cabin lights are also useful and these have a very low power draw.

    The combination of anchor light and deck lighting is encouraged by the collision regulations. This combination is mandatory for larger vessels. With low power draw LED illumination this option can be used effectively by smaller vessels.
    Last edited by noelex; 15-10-19 at 17:47.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Greenwich
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    7,737

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post
    I totally disagree. A good masthead light with a bright deck level light works very well. Not everybody is anchoring with a town as a backdrop.
    I agree - in fact for country driving I have fitted the rearlights of my new car on a pole 10 metres above the boot.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
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    8,623

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    The foretriangle is legally accepted as a location for an anchor light, though as your stern will 'face' any approaching traffic I never understood why a light off the topping lift or backstay is, also, not accepted.
    Who is it not accepted by? There's no ColRegs requirement for the anchor light to be in the foretriangle. It's required to be where it can best be seen.

    That could be fore, aft, masthead, low level, etc. depending on circumstances.
    LM Owners Association http://lmowners.proboards.com

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Mooring, Faro
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    1,976

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post
    I totally disagree. A good masthead light with a bright deck level light works very well. Not everybody is anchoring with a town as a backdrop.
    I was referring to mast head alone, no argument with "bright deck level" one.

  6. #56
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    Oct 2002
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    Plymouth
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    8,781

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleSister View Post
    Who is it not accepted by? There's no ColRegs requirement for the anchor light to be in the foretriangle. It's required to be where it can best be seen.

    That could be fore, aft, masthead, low level, etc. depending on circumstances.


    Yes, I always hoist mine on the backstay. Mainly because it is convenient but I guess you could argue that it is less likely to be masked by the mast or furled genoa.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Emsworth Hants
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    12,682

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    We had a battery powered anchor light at the back of the boat because a masthead light is difficult to see if you are anchored in front of street lights, also all anchored boats point upwind so any yacht arrriving wiil come in from behind.

  8. #58
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    Apr 2006
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    Caribbean
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    2,442

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Ww
    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    It is worth thinking about what we are trying to achieve with anchor lights. The priorities could be summed up in rough order of importance as:

    1. Visibility. The most important factor is to make yourself visible to other vessels that may be coming into the anchorage. It is worth appreciating that they likely to be approaching from your rear with possibly bright shore lights in front of your vessel. They may to be distracted trying to monitor their position, looking at the chart plotter and getting their anchor ready etc. If the weather is bad your lights will need to be bright to overcome these handicaps.
    2. Legal conformity. In the event of a collision it is important to be able easily establish your lights conform to the required standard to avoid liability.
    3. Dark adaptation. If the wind picks up at night it helpful to be able to visually check your position and the position of other boats.
    4. Power consumption. LED lights don't consume much power, but as they will be on many hours each night it is helpful to minimise the consumption as much as possible consistent with the above aims.

    There are many ways to achieve the above goals. I think for most boats an approved marine masthead anchor light combined with some lower decks lights is a good combination to consider.

    The masthead light removes any question mark over the legality of the lights. It is also a very good option for preserving dark adaptation as almost no light is visible from the helm. The lower lights can be solar, but in an ideal world would be powered from the main house bank and situated towards the stern. Powering them from the house bank means they can be bright and there is no question they will maintain that brightness. It also means if you want maximum dark adaptation they can be quickly and easily turned off from the main switchboard. This can be important if, for example, your boat starts dragging. For a quick visual check if you wake up in the night situating the lights near the rear means you can maintain reasonable dark adaptation when looking forward, which is usually the area of most interest.
    I agree with your assessment but we use a powerful led lamp that suspends in the fore triangle and faces the stern. It also sends light in a full 360 degree arc but focuses light to the stern. This means its visible from all directions but also lights up the super- structure such that it the boat can be seen very well from sides and front. When you are returning from shore we can pick the boat out easily. It also means high speed craft running through the anchorage see us well.

  9. #59
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    Jul 2005
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    3,395

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post
    Ww
    I agree with your assessment but we use a powerful led lamp that suspends in the fore triangle and faces the stern. It also sends light in a full 360 degree arc but focuses light to the stern. This means its visible from all directions but also lights up the super- structure such that it the boat can be seen very well from sides and front. When you are returning from shore we can pick the boat out easily. It also means high speed craft running through the anchorage see us well.
    An anchor light in the foretriangle can be a good solution. It depends on the boat and light.

    The best method is to try slowly motoring around the yacht with the tender on a calm evening and assess the visibility from different angles.

    It is also worth checking the obscured arc is less than the maximum allowed by the collision regulations (I think that is 6° from memory, but please check it has been some time since I looked this up). This can done with simple trigonometry.

    If it is not an approved light, it is also worth checking the brightness meets or exceeds the requirements. This is harder. Bebi are now defunct, but their website had some good details on the type and number of LEDs that were likely to meet this standard. One of the internet archives might have a copy of this.

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    8,761

    Default Re: Anchor lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Kukri View Post
    I like the Davey & Co ‘cone burner’ paraffin anchor lights, hung from the forestay about six feet from the deck. Don’t forget to secure the downhaul. Mine is a full size one off a scrapped coaster and it can easily be seen from two miles away.
    The Davey & Co design seems to be the only really reputable non-electric lamp available, pity they're no longer made. The objection to paraffin/oil/kerosene lamps appears to be the lack of beam strength or the dioptric lens which casts only a very narrow beam.

    This one (£186 from Classic Marine ) is definitely attractive, but how effective?



    https://shop.classicmarine.co.uk/4-a...ht-copper.html

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