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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,040

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iain C View Post
    In fairness, most lofts are saying go for a kite luff length less than 100% of the hoist height, and fly it slightly high of the end of the bowsprit, rather than having something more than 100%, if that makes a difference at all.
    I think that for you, as a high performance dinghy man who's going to the trouble of building himself a bowsprit, might get frustrated by that. Whilst it will work ok broad reaching, heating up does require getting the tack down to the bowsprit to prevent the sail falling off to leeward too much, even in the light winds that you would be doing this in whilst cruising.

    A further thought... One option might be to buy a cruising chute for use with the family, but look for a suitable second hand sail from something like a J92 or J105 for the lads trips.
    You never know, I might be right!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Northampton
    Posts
    560

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    When looking at increasing sails for the 389 we got the below.


    In the end went for both the FFR and the Maxi. Both use the same top down furler. Adjustable tack line for the maxi.
    The FFR is great fun to use and really gets the boat shifting but does require a bit of helming in gusts above 20kts close hauled.
    The 389 has two attachment points so the FFR is flown of the acchor roller and the maxi further out on the bowsprite.
    FFR


    Maxi

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Aberdeen Scotland
    Posts
    1,192

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    For what it's worth, I sail a Southerly 46, fractional rig carbon mast and boom, with a 95% self tacking foresail.

    The sheeting point on the self tacker is fixed, so off the wind I either have to use a barber hauler, or set an asymmetric.

    I have a 1500 sq ft A5, masthead reacher and 2000 sq ft masthead A2, both by North.

    I sail mainly single handed, and when I do have crew, they are mainly "passengers", so I almost always sail as if I'm single handed.

    I grew up sailing Merlin Rockets, Fireballs and 505's, high performance boats in their day.

    The Southerly carries quite lot of white sail, about 1200 sq ft, so the asymmetrics are very much light wind sail, the boat is heavy and doesn't plane, so there's little point in piling on more sail when she has reached hull speed.

    I started off with a snuffer, I found it very unsatisfactory, I had to work on the foredeck and struggle to get the snuffer down, often in more wind than was sensible, I have a natural tendency to wait too long as the wind increases.

    I then used a furler on the reacher, this was better, but often still a struggle to get good furl.

    I now use a Karver furler and top down furling system, with a torque rope on both Asymmetrics. I find the Asymetrics much easier to handle with the top down system. The continuous furling lines are long enough to get back to the cockpit winches, so I can use them, if necessary, to furl the sail, and the top down system gives a more reliable furl.

    The net result is that I use the sails more often, and handle them, with confidence, in stronger winds than before.
    Cheers
    Ian

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    35,796

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    I think you need to be clear what you want from a cruising asy.
    From my point of view, the biggest gain to be had on a typical cruising boat is to be able to sail effectively when other boats are reduced to motoring.
    You can get a lot of that from something that will work well in the range 5 to 10 knots true.
    Below 5 knots, nothing really works, above 10 knots, you're getting there with white sails. Around 7 knots your average cruiser sailor is motoring DDW bemoaning the calm.
    On a typical UK or channel cruise there is often a big element of wanting to go more-or-less downwind, e.g. wind blowing along the coast.
    This is where the chute really scores in the 5 to 10 knot true area, you will be heading up 20 to 30 degrees and putting the apparent fairly well forwards.
    Work out your own vectors. If your boat beam reaches at 5 knots in 7 knots of breeze with white sails, a fair size kite might give you six knots of boat speed in 7 knots at 150 TWA? I made up those numbers, make your own guesses for your boat! But it's easy to see that in light air, even a leadmine can get the apparent forward of the beam.

    In my view to make the best of this, you want a big light kite with moderate luff round.

    If you are looking for something different, perhaps:
    1) fastest possible passages in more wind, including reaching at higher angles
    or 2) To sail DDW fast in more wind,
    Then IMHO, you want 1) a smaller heavier asy with a straighter luff, or 2) a symetric kite of moderate size, maybe a large one too. Or a heavier asy with more luff curve.

    So if I was to have one nylon sail, it would be a big light asy of moderate shape.
    Next I would add a medium 'proper' spinnaker.

    You can compromise and blur the edges a bit, but start by being clear about what you want the sail to do.
    Maybe you don't see the same use pattern as me, not everyone beats to Cornwall and reaches/runs back for their summer break!
    People who are planning a Transat might well have a set of TWA's they are designing to.
    People with under-canvassed boats and/or draggy hulls might want a reaching boost in the 7 to 12 knots true area.
    These will be different requirements with different sails as answers.
    Then, please, get something well made and tri-radial or star cut, not some economy cross-cut abomination that will be cruelly mishapen after the first puff.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,505

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Quote Originally Posted by flaming View Post
    ...heading up does require getting the tack down to the bowsprit to prevent the sail falling off to leeward too much, even in the light winds...
    With only 150sq ft it may not matter on the dinghy...I'd hoped to tie off the tack to the end of the bowsprit, and not to need to adjust it in use. Not so? So many lines, so few hands to adjust them. My baggy asymmetric won't be much use anyway, close to the wind.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,809

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Don't forget if you are buying new and deffo only want one sail you can always spec a hybrid sail. Half between the two.
    The better sailmakers who are more race orientated will have all the technology to build you a sail of whatever 'tweekyness' you want.
    Whatever you get arrange your prodder so that you can have a tack line adjustable from the cockpit.
    Real men do it two handed

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,505

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Quote Originally Posted by doris View Post
    ...arrange your prodder so that you can have a tack line adjustable from the cockpit.
    Is there a concise explanation for this necessity? I'm in the dark.


  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,040

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    With only 150sq ft it may not matter on the dinghy...I'd hoped to tie off the tack to the end of the bowsprit, and not to need to adjust it in use. Not so? So many lines, so few hands to adjust them. My baggy asymmetric won't be much use anyway, close to the wind.
    It's not normal to adjust the tack line in a dinghy.

    Easing the tack line is only done on heavier, non planing, Asymmetric boats in order to encourage the sail to rotate to windward when sailing deep. Anything fast enough to plane never eases the tack line.
    You never know, I might be right!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,809

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    Quote Originally Posted by flaming View Post
    It's not normal to adjust the tack line in a dinghy.

    Easing the tack line is only done on heavier, non planing, Asymmetric boats in order to encourage the sail to rotate to windward when sailing deep. Anything fast enough to plane never eases the tack line.
    Such as a Bav 32, or my old Dehler. Also if you have eased the tack line, tighten it down before you gybe then ease again on the new gybe.,
    Real men do it two handed

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Asymmetric spinnaker or cruising chute?

    I have a cruising chute with snuffer on my Bav 34 (2001) but would like to try a Code 0

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