Page 35 of 151 FirstFirst ... 2530313233343536373839404585135 ... LastLast
Results 341 to 350 of 1504

Thread: Steelboats

  1. #341
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Newport IoW
    Posts
    616

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard10002 View Post
    Having sailed GRP yachts for 30 years, on a sea where steel leisure boats were frowned upon, to a degree, (generally on the basis that they were at great risk of rusting away).... I now have a steel narrowboat, on the canal system, where “plastic boats” are seen as the poor cousin, and weak compared to steel.
    Ironic and amusing

    Plenty of 20 to 30 year old steel narrowboats in good condition knocking around, and a few rusting hulks
    I have a 123 year-old iron sailing boat, she doen't have any rust

  2. #342
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,441

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Whilst one might accept- to a point- that BS had photo'd the slag & not the actual weld i seem to recall a comment, much earlier, that he would just grind away the slag & re weld the original area to ensure a decent job & save time. I am not sure how bodging saves time, but that is his preferred method. Added to the fact that he is welding to painted steel & the hours he is quoting for welding leaves little time for adequate preparation of the work ie paint removal etc. One might have some concern regarding the consistency of welding.

    I would also note that this creates little confidence of his ability to weld other structural components in difficult situations , I would point to bulkhead, frames , stringers etc. Ie some of the components indicated in one of his earlier pictures of shot blasting. These areas need to be welded in one go as grinding is not so easily accomplished.

    Perhaps to allay forumites suspicions BS might consider showing details of some longer finished welds prior to painting after slag removal. He must surely have some, as it would seem that he has completed an awful lot of welds. It is, after all a little unfair to denounce his ability on just one carp piece of workmanship. Let's see some more carp workmanship first.

    I note that in an earlier post he referred to times based on double chined construction. The picture shown a few post back is just a single chined box. What happened to the other chine?
    Another thing that does not fit with his explanations. I wonder if it sails like a box as well!!!

    If BS is using pre coated steel & then welding joints, one wonders how the recently welded joint (all over the hull in & out) is prevented from going rusty prior to re coating. One assumes ( I must admit that i have never been there & never want to) that in the areas where he is carrying out these works humidity, & the resulting rust level, is high.

    Perhaps not I do not know. if one welds something inside it must burn the finish outside- does it not?. This would need re treating fairly quickly. may i ask how this is dealt with?
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 22-12-18 at 22:30.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  3. #343
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,365

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by rotrax View Post
    Gotcha!

    Get out of that one Brent!

    Out of your own mouth you have destroyed your credibility re cruising/live aboard/boatbuilding as the maths does not work.

    And, as usual, you avoid answering relevant stuff and go off on another subject.

    Getting on to welding, I can use-to a VERY high standard-Oxy Acetylene kit for both conventional and bronze welding, arc welders, again to a high standard, MIG welders, ditto, and I have some small experience with TIG and Argon kit, but not much. I practiced on some damaged racing motorcycle alloy crankcases with a mates TIG gear, to the extent they are still in use today.

    If I produced a weld that looked like some of the ones you have posted, slag or no slag, I would be embarrassed to let others see it.

    Just saying...……………………………….
    If you tried to weld a steel boat the way you do motorcyles , tig, oxy acetylene, etc it would take decades to weld . With such slow, tedious methods, its understandable you would be skeptical of my time lines .No, Mr Anonymous I am not that dense. Speak for yourself.
    You may define cruising as sailing full time, 24-7, 365 days a year, without ever stopping, for decades, without ever hitting a coffee shop or library ,or cruise the internet a bit ,but few cruisers share your definition. Most of us spend a couple of weeks here, a couple of weeks there, enjoying our freedom .Some of us even spend a few days at Xmas, close to family.
    You should try it sometime .

  4. #344
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,365

    Default Re: Steelboats

    [Quote]
    Even welds that looked immaculate didn’t always pass scrutiny and yet
    [Quote]
    And someone here claims they can determine the strength and penetration of a weld, by looking at an online photo of the slag on top of it?

  5. #345
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,365

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    Whilst one might accept- to a point- that BS had photo'd the slag & not the actual weld i seem to recall a comment, much earlier, that he would just grind away the slag & re weld the original area to ensure a decent job & save time. I am not sure how bodging saves time, but that is his preferred method. Added to the fact that he is welding to painted steel & the hours he is quoting for welding leaves little time for adequate preparation of the work ie paint removal etc. One might have some concern regarding the consistency of welding.

    I would also note that this creates little confidence of his ability to weld other structural components in difficult situations , I would point to bulkhead, frames , stringers etc. Ie some of the components indicated in one of his earlier pictures of shot blasting. These areas need to be welded in one go as grinding is not so easily accomplished.

    Perhaps to allay forumites suspicions BS might consider showing details of some longer finished welds prior to painting after slag removal. He must surely have some, as it would seem that he has completed an awful lot of welds. It is, after all a little unfair to denounce his ability on just one carp piece of workmanship. Let's see some more carp workmanship first.

    I note that in an earlier post he referred to times based on double chined construction. The picture shown a few post back is just a single chined box. What happened to the other chine?
    Another thing that does not fit with his explanations. I wonder if it sails like a box as well!!!

    If BS is using pre coated steel & then welding joints, one wonders how the recently welded joint (all over the hull in & out) is prevented from going rusty prior to re coating. One assumes ( I must admit that i have never been there & never want to) that in the areas where he is carrying out these works humidity, & the resulting rust level, is high.

    Perhaps not I do not know. if one welds something inside it must burn the finish outside- does it not?. This would need re treating fairly quickly. may i ask how this is dealt with?
    The primer is all weldable, by all our rules, DOT and Compensation board approved ,and in common use here . We grind the welded parts , where the primer is burned.
    My boat was done that way and the epoxy is 97% as good as the day I put it on 34 years ago
    Al my boats are single chine, a fraction the work and complexity of a double chine.
    I don't use transverse frames, which decades of frameless boats, by many designers , have proven totally, structurally redundant, in the size of boats we are dealing with here.
    How is grinding the slag and welding "bodging the job"? How else would you do it?
    Last edited by Brent Swain; 23-12-18 at 00:56.

  6. #346
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,225

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    If you tried to weld a steel boat the way you do motorcyles , tig, oxy acetylene, etc it would take decades to weld . With such slow, tedious methods, its understandable you would be skeptical of my time lines .


    Again you show your lack of knowledge.

    Argon and TIG are as fast as arc or stick welding for long runs, once adjustments are made. A little extra time if the gas requires a bottle change. The only part you are correct about is that Oxy-Acetylene is the slowest-but nowhere near as slow as you say.

    I made no definition of cruising, again that is your incorrect implication, but you told us VERY CLEARLY that you cruise for 11 months every year, and have done for decades. And your cruising, you would have us believe, is long distance and off the beaten track.

    Not much time left to do anything else that year, is there?

    My own cruising is slow, stopping at interesting places, meeting the locals, enjoying their culture and food and moving on.

    Why do you think I am in Wellington, NZ at the moment-we are hanging out with the grandchildren for Christmas and the New Year holidays.

  7. #347
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    S.W. France
    Posts
    7,705

    Default Re: Steelboats

    I might argue that one Rotrax
    If I was going to build a steel hull and had no kit, then Mig would be my choice. Prob buy a decent kit, then flog it after. Tig is slower and much more expensive (uses more gas than Mig), more suited for specialist welding of SS or Ally, except an ally hull would justify a pulse Mig set-up (which is what the pros use).
    I learned oxy-acet by de-seaming a Mini, back in '67 but never use it now, just oxy-butane for heating and brazing. My w/shop has stick, a 285 Mig and a 200amp DC Tig, all in daily use, which is why I find BS's claims 'difficult' to accept. Plus, if he has done so much stick welding, why is he putting up photos of carp welds? I would be ashamed to have done welds like that, even if foamed over....

  8. #348
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,225

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by DownWest View Post
    I might argue that one Rotrax
    If I was going to build a steel hull and had no kit, then Mig would be my choice. Prob buy a decent kit, then flog it after. Tig is slower and much more expensive (uses more gas than Mig), more suited for specialist welding of SS or Ally, except an ally hull would justify a pulse Mig set-up (which is what the pros use).
    I learned oxy-acet by de-seaming a Mini, back in '67 but never use it now, just oxy-butane for heating and brazing. My w/shop has stick, a 285 Mig and a 200amp DC Tig, all in daily use, which is why I find BS's claims 'difficult' to accept. Plus, if he has done so much stick welding, why is he putting up photos of carp welds? I would be ashamed to have done welds like that, even if foamed over....

    I have to agree-MIG is good option. I would prefer arc or stick welding for boat building or repair myself, if I ever decided to build one. Which is very unlikely at my time of life.

    Now First Mate and I are retired we are too busy having a good time...………………

    You conform my opinion on the quality of welding. It takes so little extra time to do a strong and presentable weld-why do a bad looking one that might be suspect.

    Especially, why show it on an internet forum where it must reflect badly on ones workmanship.

  9. #349
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,550

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Being Christmas Eve tomorrow, one wonders if Brent, John, Rotrax, et al will spontaneously emerge from their virtual trenches to offer gifts, and perhaps even participate in a game of virtual football?

  10. #350
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Home: North West, Boat: The Clyde
    Posts
    3,645

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    And someone here claims they can determine the strength and penetration of a weld, by looking at an online photo of the slag on top of it?
    I guess this is me? Although true to form it's a misrepresentation of what I actually wrote.

    I was taught how to weld, gas and electric as an apprentice. During that training, I've had many test pieces thrown in the bin by the instructor well before being passed through to the stages of NDT and destructive testing, so, yes, I can recognise a poor weld by looking at it In my career, I've been around welding in industrial, oil & gas and military sectors. Welding is a knowledge based, disciplined skill which involves many variables. It's about attention to detail, for example welding dissimilar metals may require certain pre-conditioning. As many other posters have commented, Mr S, no one with the appropriate skill, to say nothing of simple pride in ones own work, would have posted the picture in the first place. It's obvious to all that you can't weld, you scored an own goal

    Notwithstanding, compliments of the season

Page 35 of 151 FirstFirst ... 2530313233343536373839404585135 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to