Page 33 of 136 FirstFirst ... 2328293031323334353637384383133 ... LastLast
Results 321 to 330 of 1354

Thread: Steelboats

  1. #321
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,315

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Here is another great quote from one of the face book forums, comparing aluminium to steel.
    [Quote]


    Josh Hannigan Here’s another way to look at it, a 1lb block of aluminum may be “stronger” than a 1lb steel block, but 1lb of aluminum will be much larger than 1lb of steel. So, perhaps, aluminum is pound for pound stronger. However, a 1’x1’ 5/16ths piece of steel plate is far stronger than a 1’x1’ 5/16ths piece of aluminum plate. And “strength” needs to be defined here. Steel is more flexible than aluminum in terms of impact strength and sheer strength when comparing equivalent gauges of material. That’s why it costs so much more to produce aluminum boats, etc, because more material is required to achieve comparable strengths, and welding aluminum is much trickier which also ups the production costs to achieve comparable reliability of weld integrity.

  2. #322
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,016

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    The title of this thread is about STEEL BOATS. So what does your own personal experience have to do with that, or your constantly raving on about plastic being ones only option? Take your arguments to a plastic boat thread.NO this thread is not about plastic boats.
    My posting of wrecked plastic boats is an appropriate response to your raving on about wrecked and neglected steel boats, implying that never happens to plastic boats. You imply that such truths should never be posted, in response to such attacks on steel as a boat building material. You imply that only one side should be posted, the pro plastic side.
    So what is your experience in sailing, owning, building, maintaining and crossing oceans, in steel boats , over how many decades, which qualify you to say someone with over 4 decades of such hands on experience, is wrong ?
    Like I said, rant and raver par excellence. You bring implications to the discussion that are and were never there, except in your one track mind.

    Remember-I do keep a steel yacht in Wellington, so I have some experience of maintaining an old steel boat, and I owned a steel narrowboat in the UK for many years, so I have PLENTY of hands on experience. As I have owned four GRP yachts, the difference between maintaining a steel boat and a GRP boat is something I CAN comment on with authority. You cannot, never having owned a GRP boat.

    In fact, with far more authority than a one track minder who has no basis for comparison except blind prejudice against GRP.

    This was a steel boat thread until you started calling GRP boat owners Marina Queens and their chosen vessels Toy Boats. What do you expect-GRP owners are doing EXACTLY what you do, defend their chosen vessel.

    When challenged to give PRECISE DETAILS of wrecked GRP boats, its always hearsay, gossip or years old. Boats have always been in hazard at sea, whats new? Structural failure, which you keep banging on about with GRP boats rarely happens, if it does,usually after a grounding.

    I have never attacked steel boats other than suggesting that most older ones are a maintenance nightmare. I don't recall raving on about wrecked steel boats, just several badly neglected ones, some in Portsmouth Harbour and one in Wellington. You are delusional about anything other than that.

    Apparently your boat is not a maintenance nightmare, well done. I have praised you for that several times too.

    But most steel boats, even un-neglected ones- are a maintenance nightmare by comparison to GRP boats. I believe that is beyond dispute.

    Still waiting for your comment on Jean Socrates.

    Not expecting you to admit you are were wrong-that's obviously not in your DNA...……………...
    Last edited by rotrax; 21-12-18 at 04:21.

  3. #323
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,016

    Default Re: Steelboats

    [QUOTE=Brent Swain;6644438]Here is another great quote from one of the face book forums, comparing aluminium to steel.


    Josh Hannigan Here’s another way to look at it, a 1lb block of aluminum may be “stronger” than a 1lb steel block, but 1lb of aluminum will be much larger than 1lb of steel. So, perhaps, aluminum is pound for pound stronger. However, a 1’x1’ 5/16ths piece of steel plate is far stronger than a 1’x1’ 5/16ths piece of aluminum plate. And “strength” needs to be defined here. Steel is more flexible than aluminum in terms of impact strength and sheer strength when comparing equivalent gauges of material. That’s why it costs so much more to produce aluminum boats, etc, because more material is required to achieve comparable strengths, and welding aluminum is much trickier which also ups the production costs to achieve comparable reliability of weld integrity.
    Patronising us again BS! The above is common knowledge and is not in dispute.

    Why bring it to the party?

    Just asking.

    What Josh Hannigan does not mention is that with aluminium being SO much lighter, it can be used in much thicker material to achieve optimum strength for the application and still be lighter, an important feature in many applications.

    Perhaps he had not thought of that, or, like you, he dismisses any material other than steel by selective use of data...………………………..
    Last edited by rotrax; 21-12-18 at 04:18. Reason: adding a relevant point

  4. #324
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Farnham, Surrey
    Posts
    21,158

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by bbg View Post
    So what is your experience in sailing, owning, building, maintaining and crossing oceans, in GRP boats , over how many decades, which qualify you to say others with many decades of such hands on experience, are wrong ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    My methods eliminate the lifting of oversized plates, like the two 8 ft by 36 foot hull plates, or the need for overhead cranes., The biggest piece lifted, , the cabin top, we crank up with comealongs, staying on the uphill side of the plate. When lifting anything heavy ,one should calculate which way it would fall, if it did, and just stay clear of that area ,until what you are lifting is well welded down. Doing that can eliminate the chances of anything falling on you
    In the S Pacific you see people with missing arms ,from having got between a boat and the reef, while trying to get her off.
    My 36 is a run of several hundred, none of which have had any serious structural problems at sea. 4 have circumnavigated.
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    You hear wrong. You worship documentation, implying that everything which happens is documented. Show us some documentation to prove it.
    This is an utterly bizarre post.

    I don’t worship documentation but I do like to see supporting evidence for wild claims.

    Man loses arm in trying to push his yacht off a reef is something that would get reported in the yachting press. Especially as you refer to people (plural) that you’ve seen.

    One armed sailors in the Pacific would make the news.

    But it doesn’t; hence yet another wild claim that brings doubt to people’s minds about all your claims.
    Semper aliud

  5. #325
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,016

    Default Re: Steelboats

    As my old Rugby mate Finnbar O'Donahue used to say about those who invented and stretched truths beyond belief " Sure and he is a figment of his own imagination! "

  6. #326
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    376

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Originally Posted by newtothis View Post
    If you like it so much there, go there. You only seem to come here to troll and argue. If you didn't keep bringing these long argued-out threads back to life they would just die off as no one is particularly interested in your peculiar views. And those that are can know where to find you on a forum where everyone thinks you're wonderful and worships your tin cans. You're not going to change anyone's mind so why don't you go back to your mythical 11 months a year of cruising.
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
    If you like plastic so much, what are you doing on a steel boat thread ?
    Go argue on plastic boat thread, or start one up. You are only here to sabotage the passing on of info on steel boats.
    Brent, you've forgotten to address the last part of my post, which goes to your veracity.
    On 30 April you posted:
    "I cruise year round, as do many of my clients ,and have done 9 Pacific crossings, and cruised all the South Pacific islands which interested me . I have lost count of how many of my boats have been built ,but I have put together over 3 dozen of them, as have others . I roughly estimate as many as 200. I have cruised average 11 months a year ,or more ( not a short season) for the last 40 years. Many of my clients do the same. 4 have circumnavigated .We only see a lot of plastic boats leave the marina for 3 months a year around here.
    So much for your "limited ,part time" theory!"

    And yet you have managed to post on this forum every month since then. Now leaving aside your patchy maths [11 months on average or more?] and your ability to build a boat each year in your month off, you either have communications abilities on your bare-bones tin can that only sponsored ocean racers can dream of, or you are parked up and using wifi developed, operated and paid for by one of those working schmucks of which you are so dismissive.
    Given that you retired to see the reefs and lee shores of the Pacific before you were 30, one assumes you're relying on the comfort of strangers or the state to support yourself, but your even if you are living aboard, and haven't seemed to have moved from your Pacific northwest base with all its give-away yachts, one can only assume, that you, Brent, are a.... Marina Queen.

  7. #327
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Home: North West, Boat: The Clyde
    Posts
    3,569

    Default Re: Steelboats

    There's a lot of regurgitated, provocative nonsense posted within this thread, typical of a classic Troll.

    I'd be very concerned for the many owners of BS built boats; when they eventually hit a reef the hull may well peel open as the bird-shit welds give up their grip on the surrounding plates. From the pictures posted, not much chance of any weld penetration holding them together

    Opps, this Trolling becomes infectious.

  8. #328
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,315

    Default Re: Steelboats

    [QUOTE=davidjackson;6644853]There's a lot of regurgitated, provocative nonsense posted within this thread, typical of a classic Troll.

    I'd be very concerned for the many owners of BS built boats; when they eventually hit a reef the hull may well peel open as the bird-shit welds give up their grip on the surrounding plates. From the pictures posted, not much chance of any weld penetration holding them together
    ]Quote]

    The first 36 I built pounded for 16 days in up to 12 ft surf on a Baja lee shore just south of San Ignacio and was pulled off thru 12q ft surf. No welds broke. Your claim that you can determine the strength of a weld by looking at a photo of the slag covering it on line, is as ludicrous as ever. You could put weld X rays out of business? Just send you a photo of the slag? You can determine penetration by looking at a photo of the slag?Ya sure! None of my welds has ever broken, in over 40 years of steel boat building . Counts more than an armchair experts look at a photo of the slag on it, before chipping.

  9. #329
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,315

    Default Re: Steelboats

    [QUOTE=Brent Swain;6645411][QUOTE=davidjackson;6644853]There's a lot of regurgitated, provocative nonsense posted within this thread, typical of a classic Troll.

    I'd be very concerned for the many owners of BS built boats; when they eventually hit a reef the hull may well peel open as the bird-shit welds give up their grip on the surrounding plates. From the pictures posted, not much chance of any weld penetration holding them together
    ]Quote]


    The first 36 I built pounded for 16 days in up to 12 ft surf on a Baja lee shore just south of San Ignacio and was pulled off thru 12q ft surf. No welds broke. Your claim that you can determine the strength of a weld by looking at a photo of the slag covering it on line, is as ludicrous as ever. You could put weld X rays out of business? Just send you a photo of the slag? You can determine penetration by looking at a photo of the slag?Ya sure! None of my welds has ever broken, in over 40 years of steel boat building . Counts more than an armchair experts look at a photo of the slag on it, before chipping.

  10. #330
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Oxfordshire, Gosport and Wellington New Zealand.
    Posts
    8,016

    Default Re: Steelboats

    Quote Originally Posted by newtothis View Post
    Brent, you've forgotten to address the last part of my post, which goes to your veracity.
    On 30 April you posted:
    "I cruise year round, as do many of my clients ,and have done 9 Pacific crossings, and cruised all the South Pacific islands which interested me . I have lost count of how many of my boats have been built ,but I have put together over 3 dozen of them, as have others . I roughly estimate as many as 200. I have cruised average 11 months a year ,or more ( not a short season) for the last 40 years. Many of my clients do the same. 4 have circumnavigated .We only see a lot of plastic boats leave the marina for 3 months a year around here.
    So much for your "limited ,part time" theory!"

    And yet you have managed to post on this forum every month since then. Now leaving aside your patchy maths [11 months on average or more?] and your ability to build a boat each year in your month off, you either have communications abilities on your bare-bones tin can that only sponsored ocean racers can dream of, or you are parked up and using wifi developed, operated and paid for by one of those working schmucks of which you are so dismissive.
    Given that you retired to see the reefs and lee shores of the Pacific before you were 30, one assumes you're relying on the comfort of strangers or the state to support yourself, but your even if you are living aboard, and haven't seemed to have moved from your Pacific northwest base with all its give-away yachts, one can only assume, that you, Brent, are a.... Marina Queen.

    Gotcha!

    Get out of that one Brent!

    Out of your own mouth you have destroyed your credibility re cruising/live aboard/boatbuilding as the maths does not work.

    And, as usual, you avoid answering relevant stuff and go off on another subject.

    Getting on to welding, I can use-to a VERY high standard-Oxy Acetylene kit for both conventional and bronze welding, arc welders, again to a high standard, MIG welders, ditto, and I have some small experience with TIG and Argon kit, but not much. I practiced on some damaged racing motorcycle alloy crankcases with a mates TIG gear, to the extent they are still in use today.

    If I produced a weld that looked like some of the ones you have posted, slag or no slag, I would be embarrassed to let others see it.

    Just saying...……………………………….

Page 33 of 136 FirstFirst ... 2328293031323334353637384383133 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to