Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,779

    Default Puilladobhrain information

    People who visit this popular Scottish anchorage may be interested to know that the Tigh an Truish hotel is closed for major refurbishment. The bar is open, but there will be no meals for the foreseeable future.

    For Sasunnachs, the anchorage and the hotel, which is just over the hill, are on the island of Seil, which is connected to the Scottish mainland by the "Bridge over the Atlantic". After the 1745 Uprising, the wearing of the Tartan was proscribed by the government, and so when leaving the island, men would remove their kilts, and put on trousers. The meaning of Tigh an Truish is "The house of the trousers".

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Second Coast, Ross-shire, overlooking Gruinard Bay.
    Posts
    7,007

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information


    On behalf of the "sasunnachs in exile" who live north of Berwick-Gretna, thank you!
    Kay Sarah Sarah
    5751.42' N 529.44' W

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    18,878

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    For Sasunnachs, the anchorage and the hotel, which is just over the hill, are on the island of Seil, which is connected to the Scottish mainland by the "Bridge over the Atlantic". After the 1745 Uprising, the wearing of the Tartan was proscribed by the government, and so when leaving the island, men would remove their kilts, and put on trousers. The meaning of Tigh an Truish is "The house of the trousers".
    That's the story, but it's a bit dodgy, not least because kilts hadn't been invented then. During the period of the Act of Proscription (1746 - 1782) highlanders would have worn a belted plaid, and there is no particular reason to think that wearing a plaid on the mainland would have been significantly more risky than wearing one on Seil. Still, it's a nice story for the tourists.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,850

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    The meaning of Tigh an Truish is "The house of the trousers".
    So I have to wonder - how old is the name? and why else would it have the name?

    Jonathan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,779

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    So I have to wonder - how old is the name? and why else would it have the name?

    Jonathan
    A quick Google says it's an 18th Century Inn. "Truish" sounds very like "trews".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    18,878

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    So I have to wonder - how old is the name? and why else would it have the name?
    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    A quick Google says it's an 18th Century Inn. "Truish" sounds very like "trews".
    The gaelic for trousers is "briogais" (breeks) or "triubhas" (trews). I can't find "Truish" in any of the online dictionaries, but Gaelic orthography has changed a lot over the years and it's quite possible that "truish" is an old spelling of "triubhas".

    Even so, there could be lots of reasons for the name. A tailor who made trousers lived there? The landlord in 1734 was the first man on Seil to wear trousers? The landlord was very small (troich = dwarf)? It was a house next to a narrow channel of water (troich = ditch)? Someone wanted an entertaining story to tell the tourists?

    The tartan-for-trews (which were traditionally made of tartan, and therefore proscribed ...) story is not impossible, but I think it needs stronger evidence than is normally presented.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Embra, maybe onboard Matilda
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    My understanding, materal grandfather from Balvicar, is that tartan (mainly a modern invention) wasn't banned. The garment itself was not allowed as it was multipurpose: a sleeping roll, coat, blanket. This allowed early wild camping. The Forestry Commision or some other government forces didn't like this apparently. Troosers are less adaptable, or were until Craghoppers came along.
    My favourite story is of my Great Uncle rowing for his weekly pint at the pub.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Stirling
    Posts
    14,314

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    and why else would it have the name?
    I've read another explanation that breeks were made there. Seems more plausible than hanging up one's plaid.
    Ω

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    In the far North
    Posts
    9,688

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Well, whilst this is interesting, I'm disappointed that the OP didn't mention the pontoons which are now almost complete, I understand?
    Also, I did hear that Webcraft had something to do with the Tigh needing to be refurbished. Apparently he opened his wallet a week or two back and the tremors that reverberated through the place, as all the other customers fainted and hit the floor brought the roof down.
    Claymore

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,039

    Default Re: Puilladobhrain information

    Quote Originally Posted by claymore View Post
    Well, whilst this is interesting, I'm disappointed that the OP didn't mention the pontoons which are now almost complete, I understand?
    Also, I did hear that Webcraft had something to do with the Tigh needing to be refurbished. Apparently he opened his wallet a week or two back and the tremors that reverberated through the place, as all the other customers fainted and hit the floor brought the roof down.
    Pontoons, Puilladobhran in the same sentence??? Or at Balvicar? I think of a whole generation or two who would turn in their grave (or even in anticipation) at the idea of pontoons! by Puilladobhrain??

    Where may they be?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to