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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Nelson New Zealand
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    I might have a single beer with lunch when underway or at a lunch stop but no more than that which may surprise some who have me pegged as a bit of a drinker. My reasoning is that as skipper i usually have less experienced crew and i have responsibility for them which i do take seriously.
    If i am single handed, then i need all of my wits and energy while sailing.

    At anchor in known and very, very sheltered anchorages, I am happy to indulge myself.
    So I enjoy sailing and i enjoy drinking, in that order and not often simultaneously.

    After assessing the risks, I have fitted a hi level guard wire (dyneema) across the pushpit to make it near impossible to fall in the oggin whilst pumping bilges. Apparently, many drunk older males have perished while relieving themselves over the stern even in calm weather at anchor!

    And i think the key is this: Sailing skippers are generally rugged individualists well accustomed to assessing risks and acting accordingly. I do believe that to own and skipper a boat requires a degree of bloody mindedness and willingness to rely on ones own judgement and live with the consequences.
    Aiming to live forever or die in the attempt!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Emsworth Hants
    Posts
    12,516

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Across the Atlantic we allowed one drink for either of us who finished a night watch at midnight. After a long passage we would put the boat to bed, have something to eat then get completely pi**ed. Strangely we never had a hangover in the morning.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Keswick, Cumbria
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by TLouth7 View Post
    Anyone going to admit to having a few beers over the course of a relaxing day's sail?

    The key difference I see to driving a car is that you are not relying on quick reflexes and peripheral vision to avoid crashing into things, except in a few specific circumstances.
    Yup, quite happily. I enjoy beer or wine while sailing, if it's a nice day and don't restrict alcohol at anchor in case of anything going wrong either.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    15,590

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by BlowingOldBoots View Post
    My employer is a major oil and gas company and their biggest killer is road incidents, not incidents involving oil and gas activities. The most dangerous country for road incidents in the USA, worse than Saudi, Pakistan, South Africa, Nigeria for example. The hypocrisy of my employer is staggering. In the example countries there are strict controls over how I go about driving e.g. journey management, in vehicle monitoring, training and oil some cases a ban on driving except via professional drivers. The Americans do not want any of that, so they don't get it. Yanks can't drive, they believe that driving for hours is acceptable, commuting between Houston and NewOrleans for example, daily. I have drill crews that come off two week shifts, after working nights, get in their cars and drive a 1000 miles non stop.
    The land of the free! You give the impression of being a liberal dogooder type on here. Fortunately for us there is still a country in the world that allows its people to go around "doing what a man has to do!" More power to them is what I say!
    Stu

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,538

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    So what's wrong with Sex, Drugs and Rock 'n Roll.....?

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    boat Trindad
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Tribe View Post
    I went out on my son's motorboat to watch the new years fireworks on Brisbane river.
    Loads of boats anchored but also a large police presence, many on PWCs. Almost every boat was visited and many breathalised.
    Apparently you can lose your car licence if over the limit. Nobody seemed to object.
    Perhaps it's the future for UK too?
    No. It's only okay in an ex-prison colony with single joined-up governing authority and supervising overseas head of state.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    15,590

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by t21 View Post
    No. It's only okay in an ex-prison colony with single joined-up governing authority and supervising overseas head of state.
    Another sock puppet popped up?

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Deale, MD, USA
    Posts
    1,753

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by BlowingOldBoots View Post
    My employer is a major oil and gas company and their biggest killer is road incidents, not incidents involving oil and gas activities. The most dangerous country for road incidents in the USA, worse than Saudi, Pakistan, South Africa, Nigeria for example. The hypocrisy of my employer is staggering. In the example countries there are strict controls over how I go about driving e.g. journey management, in vehicle monitoring, training and oil some cases a ban on driving except via professional drivers. The Americans do not want any of that, so they don't get it. Yanks can't drive, they believe that driving for hours is acceptable, commuting between Houston and NewOrleans for example, daily. I have drill crews that come off two week shifts, after working nights, get in their cars and drive a 1000 miles non stop.
    The limit for US truck drivers is zero. If you are hauling hazardous materials (petroleum), a single failure you loose your truck license permanently. Same with narcotics (marijuana has been legalized in a few states, but trucking regulation is federal and will never be changed IMHO). There are also strict limits on hours of service.

    Non-commercial vehicles are not regulated in the same way.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Deale, MD, USA
    Posts
    1,753

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by TLouth7 View Post
    Anyone going to admit to having a few beers over the course of a relaxing day's sail?

    The key difference I see to driving a car is that you are not relying on quick reflexes and peripheral vision to avoid crashing into things, except in a few specific circumstances.
    Yes. Not when it's kicking and not before entering a marina. Otherwise, a 24 hour max of two, at least one of which will likely be consumed underway, mostly if the sailing is dull.

    And I don't get sloshed, ever. I out grew that at about 20. Likewise, no one on the boat will get sloshed. it's... immature.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    River Dart
    Posts
    1,526

    Default Re: Alcohol and boating

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    Almost never while under way. Maybe a small 250ml bottle of beer in calm weather and familiar waters, but not often. The main effects on co-ordination and decision making seemed to be after several drinks, which is what one would expect. The effects of one or two drinks would only be evident at night or in demanding circumstances, unlike car-driving, so I think that reasonable caution should be enough for most of us. Cheers.
    +1. Apart from anything else, as someone who almost never suffers from seasickness, I learned the hard way that having too much the night before can result in awful mal de mer the next day, if it gets a bit rough.

    We therefore tend to stick to soft drinks, tea, coffee, etc., while on passage, but happily indulge when safely tied up in port. I would limit intake if anchored overnight, just in case, but wouldn’t let it stop me enjoying a glass.

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