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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4,935

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    ... I have one of those Southend Engineering Company joint seacock and strainers (I'm sure everyone knows those) which resides 'au bilge' some 5' 6" below top of the bridgedeck. I could remove the cold store (part of the companion steps) but it is (a) too sodding heavy unless I drink all the beer first, and (b) too heavy cos the cold store is stainless lined, and (c) quite large, and then I would need to kneel down sur la cabin floor (highly varnish 1" iroko, of course). Lifting the bridgedeck hatch permits me to lift out the seacock hook thingy and open and shut the sea cock. Actually now I think of that after 26 years, I could use the wooden boathook - doh! The seacock handle has an eye to facilitate opening and closing ....
    Thank you for the explanation, which was along the lines I suspected. I was somewhat reminded of Charles Stock's extolling the virtues of a cane to push down his pyjama legs once he had settled into his bunk, but I guess that required no varnishing.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    London / Suffolk
    Posts
    434

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    It was a bit of a wild day today to varnish:

    P1040186 by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr



    but it is (a) too sodding heavy unless I drink all the beer first,
    Looking great

    I'm trying to find the problem with part a ?

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Wot on earth I am to do today; it's raining!
    www.crossingthethamesestuary.com

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Update (have I achieved 99% boredom on the thread yet?)

    P1040190 by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    TG pulled out today. Too windy for now to varnish today anyway. Just waiting for her to be moved and chocked: then check over seams, prime bottom, flat down topsides, undercoat topsides, prime bottom again, gloss topsides, first coat AF, re-paint the cove line, second coat AF - back into the water. Today's report - Rudder heel bearing still fine - no evidence of any excessive wear (it's a constant issue; the pintle effectively grinds away at the socket of the heel in a fine grinding paste aka silty water), cutless bearing fine. The high pressure has found out quite a lot of lifting A/F and primer - best to find the bare spots but all the planks absolutely fine. Nothing to worry.

    In theory I could get back in the water by Wednesday, saving any wet days and a day off on Sunday.
    www.crossingthethamesestuary.com

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    'this. What a dork I have been. I thought today the weather was going to be better than forecast.

    Lovely morning in the new location:

    P1040194 by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    Good weather and looking stable. Out with the brush, etc, etc. Just finish and then the weather changes quickly and sudden and immediate. The Met Office were forecasting a little rain @ 4pm - but by 1230 it starts. So that's bungled - waste of money and time....
    www.crossingthethamesestuary.com

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Here or there
    Posts
    74,822

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    Update (have I achieved 99% boredom on the thread yet?)

    P1040190 by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    TG pulled out today. Too windy for now to varnish today anyway. Just waiting for her to be moved and chocked: then check over seams, prime bottom, flat down topsides, undercoat topsides, prime bottom again, gloss topsides, first coat AF, re-paint the cove line, second coat AF - back into the water. Today's report - Rudder heel bearing still fine - no evidence of any excessive wear (it's a constant issue; the pintle effectively grinds away at the socket of the heel in a fine grinding paste aka silty water), cutless bearing fine. The high pressure has found out quite a lot of lifting A/F and primer - best to find the bare spots but all the planks absolutely fine. Nothing to worry.

    In theory I could get back in the water by Wednesday, saving any wet days and a day off on Sunday.
    Enjoy the antifoulinf application, we were here
    20180511_113011.jpg
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    20180511_161814.jpg
    Brexit: ‘taking back’ what we had never lost, in order to lose everything we had...

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Can I point out that Premier quality GLOATING CAN RAISE HACKLES!

    'orrid today. A strong northerly was accelerating between us and the neighbouring boats effectively providing a gale either side. Got her flatted but with the winds forecast apart from tomorrow looks impossible for painting let alone vanishing. Gloom, gloom, gloom......
    www.crossingthethamesestuary.com

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Burnham-on-Crouch, UK
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    Update (have I achieved 99% boredom on the thread yet?)

    P1040190 by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr:

    Almost on a par with dredging at Wells, but relieved by the photos of how beautifully you keep TG.

    Peter.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Let me achieve the ECF's peak for boredom i.e. 100%. Bit of a drift:

    For the last 3 years there has been a small leak aft port, low down right by the engine bearer. Makes about a litre in a fortnight. But difficult to find. But solved! I feel sorry for you plastic boat owners - worrying about your osmosis. MAB - simples. When the yard chocks you slightly aft, the bead of moisture au bilge (technical MAB term) will expose the leaky seam dead simples. Find the damp and go poking (its behind the aft strop at the image above:

    P1040198a by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    Having exposed the leak, then raking forward and aft until the stopping is rock hard and the cotton underneath is dry - (below in progress, bilge still with bead of moisture au bilge - you can still see tis dripping!):

    P1040200a by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    I didn't take a final image but will do in the morning to ultra boredom. Now if you had a problem with the bottom of a plastic boat - 'tish - lots to do. MAB dead simple:

    1. dry out the bilge (otherwise the seam will stay wet until it drains out. Not really very technical;
    2. let the exposed seam dry. Not really very technical;
    3. once dry, prime in the seam. Not really very technical;
    4. hammer in some cotton. Not really very technical;
    5. now technical - some say now prime the cotton once firmed up in the seam: others say don't. Very technical;
    6. now mix up some red lead putty. Not very technical;
    7. wop (technical term) the putty in the seam. Not very technical;
    8. now prime the outside of the seam, AF, AF, launch. Not very technical.

    Can you see the logic of having a MAB? Once I am afloat I can lift up the floor boards and gaze on the bilges, exuding the pleasure and pride of having a dry bilge.

    I really do feel for the worry for thingy what might happen with a plastic boat: Sailorman will be looking at the bottom of a Duvel glass remembering that he ought to be gets a moisture meter, stripping off his gel coat and drying his bum with Infra-red lamps for 6 months.
    www.crossingthethamesestuary.com

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Here or there
    Posts
    74,822

    Default Re: Perfect day yesterday for vanish

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    Let me achieve the ECF's peak for boredom i.e. 100%. Bit of a drift:

    For the last 3 years there has been a small leak aft port, low down right by the engine bearer. Makes about a litre in a fortnight. But difficult to find. But solved! I feel sorry for you plastic boat owners - worrying about your osmosis. MAB - simples. When the yard chocks you slightly aft, the bead of moisture au bilge (technical MAB term) will expose the leaky seam dead simples. Find the damp and go poking (its behind the aft strop at the image above:

    P1040198a by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    Having exposed the leak, then raking forward and aft until the stopping is rock hard and the cotton underneath is dry - (below in progress, bilge still with bead of moisture au bilge - you can still see tis dripping!):

    P1040200a by Roger Gaspar, on Flickr

    I didn't take a final image but will do in the morning to ultra boredom. Now if you had a problem with the bottom of a plastic boat - 'tish - lots to do. MAB dead simple:

    1. dry out the bilge (otherwise the seam will stay wet until it drains out. Not really very technical;
    2. let the exposed seam dry. Not really very technical;
    3. once dry, prime in the seam. Not really very technical;
    4. hammer in some cotton. Not really very technical;
    5. now technical - some say now prime the cotton once firmed up in the seam: others say don't. Very technical;
    6. now mix up some red lead putty. Not very technical;
    7. wop (technical term) the putty in the seam. Not very technical;
    8. now prime the outside of the seam, AF, AF, launch. Not very technical.

    Can you see the logic of having a MAB? Once I am afloat I can lift up the floor boards and gaze on the bilges, exuding the pleasure and pride of having a dry bilge.

    I really do feel for the worry for thingy what might happen with a plastic boat: Sailorman will be looking at the bottom of a Duvel glass remembering that he ought to be gets a moisture meter, stripping off his gel coat and drying his bum with Infra-red lamps for 6 months.
    No chance Bud, a plastic fantastic is the way forward, one foreign trip under the belt already , whilst you looked for a leak ( must admit not the best trip but hey ho ). We made the correct decision to come back Saturday to make sure the crew could go to work Tuesday. Me, ive been pest control the rest of the week, 14 bunnies today
    Brexit: ‘taking back’ what we had never lost, in order to lose everything we had...

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