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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Butts Ash Near Hythe,Hants,UK
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    [QUOTE=NPMR;6436618]We don't seem able to make a pair of binoculars last very long. Time and again they get 'double vision' with 2 images side by side. We have tended to buy the cheaper variety and tried both fixed and adjustable focus types.

    So often it is luck whether a bumped bino will go out of alignment or not.
    I have had one customer whose bino fell off a coffee table onto carpet and went out whilst another stood on the top of his landrover to check livestock but left the bino on the roof as he climbed down. The bino overtook him at the first bend and continued to the bottom of the hill. Only a few scratches. Russian 7x50.



    The debate I'm having, is will I be better served by a more expensive pair? For 3 or 4 times the cost of the cheaper ones, will they last 3 or 4 times longer (or preferably, even longer)?

    Steiner, Zeiss, Leitz, Nikon and Swarovski costing very many hundreds still go out if dropped but not so easily or as often as Aldi £19.99.



    Would it be worth the extra for an inbuilt compass, as well?

    Probably not apart from the fun of still making a single position fix using the compass bearing and distance-off tables.

    Nearly all binoculars have four prisms inside and the factories use different methods to secure them. Most are strapped and glued but when jarred, the glue can crack. After resetting and aligning, this glue should be renewed or the slightest bump in future will upset the alignment.
    Many models have four small grub screws, one pushing on each prism for adjustment. Some screws are locked with thread adhesive so wont move easily at first.
    Some models have eccentric rings around the object glass.
    Some waterproof marine models have plugged holes in the top plate to allow access to vertical screws which alter the position of inner plates on which the prisms are secured.

    You can get a shockproof MIL STD 810 8x30 for £179 or the same spec 7x50 for £189.

    Current reset and align costs around £50 plus return postage
    You know you are getting old when your back goes out more than you.www.actionoptics.co.uk[/url]

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    3,359

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    My Pentax 7x50 bins got dropped by a crewmember about 4 yrs ago, sent them to a small outfit I found on line, it cost £50 and they were perfect when returned. I only take them on board when on a long trip relying on an ancient Russian 7x50's bought from a street market in Moscow years ago during Glastnost. These stay on board and still work ok but the rubber eyepieces have deteriorated and held on with masking tape!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    18,706

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Quote Originally Posted by PetiteFleur View Post
    My Pentax 7x50 bins got dropped by a crewmember about 4 yrs ago, sent them to a small outfit I found on line, it cost £50 and they were perfect when returned. I only take them on board when on a long trip relying on an ancient Russian 7x50's bought from a street market in Moscow years ago during Glastnost. These stay on board and still work ok but the rubber eyepieces have deteriorated and held on with masking tape!
    That's the whole point. You don't actually need especially good binoculars on a sailing boat since almost any pair will be a zillion times better than your eyes, or at least 7 anyway. For many of us the next question is whether we want to fork out for a stabilised pair. I have had great pleasure from mine but I'm not sure that they have often made a critical difference, whereas my old 7x50s have, by virtue of their light-gathering.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    243

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Yipee, just fixed an old "favourite" pair that were my dad's before he passed away. I dropped them last year and they suffered the double image problem. I fixed them by tweaking the screws until they looked good again. Probably not optically perfect but very usable and my eyes can't tell the difference.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    18,706

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Quote Originally Posted by greeny View Post
    Yipee, just fixed an old "favourite" pair that were my dad's before he passed away. I dropped them last year and they suffered the double image problem. I fixed them by tweaking the screws until they looked good again. Probably not optically perfect but very usable and my eyes can't tell the difference.
    I think that fewer than 60% of people have true binocular vision, so that as long as your binoculars give a single image for your eyes, that is all they need to do. It is possible that they only need to be within a certain range for your eyes to adapt, just so long as you don't lend them to someone else.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    2,444

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    I think that fewer than 60% of people have true binocular vision, so that as long as your binoculars give a single image for your eyes, that is all they need to do. It is possible that they only need to be within a certain range for your eyes to adapt, just so long as you don't lend them to someone else.
    Maybe so long as you don't indulge in long PI surveillance stints so the effort gives you a headache!

    Mike.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat: Portsmouth, Us: Stewkley
    Posts
    2,918

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    I think that fewer than 60% of people have true binocular vision, so that as long as your binoculars give a single image for your eyes, that is all they need to do. It is possible that they only need to be within a certain range for your eyes to adapt, just so long as you don't lend them to someone else.
    Though it may also be true that the accuracy of alignment needed is greater on a moving boat than when you're in the shop trying them out. I have two identical pairs. The one I use on the boat has better alignment.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Butts Ash Near Hythe,Hants,UK
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Double image 7x50 binoculars. Again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruffles View Post
    Though it may also be true that the accuracy of alignment needed is greater on a moving boat than when you're in the shop trying them out. I have two identical pairs. The one I use on the boat has better alignment.
    and horizontal mis-alignment is easier for your brain to compensate although may still give a headache.
    Vertical mis-alignment is instantly tiring even painful.
    You know you are getting old when your back goes out more than you.www.actionoptics.co.uk[/url]

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