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Thread: Sail slides

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    1,324

    Default Re: Sail slides

    For the sail to drop fully under gravity the slides must be able to twist freely relative to the luff of the sail. As the sail starts to concertina down onto the boom the luff will want to cross the axis of the mast almost at right angles rather than being in line with it as when the sail is fully hoisted. The attachment of the slides to the sail must allow for this twisting. Taped-on slides are often taped on too tightly. I changed from taped on to screw shackles and found that my sail dropped much more readily and completely. Obviously reducing friction of the slide in the mast is also important.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    14,091

    Default Re: Sail slides

    Quote Originally Posted by JimC View Post
    For the sail to drop fully under gravity the slides must be able to twist freely relative to the luff of the sail. As the sail starts to concertina down onto the boom the luff will want to cross the axis of the mast almost at right angles rather than being in line with it as when the sail is fully hoisted. The attachment of the slides to the sail must allow for this twisting. Taped-on slides are often taped on too tightly. I changed from taped on to screw shackles and found that my sail dropped much more readily and completely. Obviously reducing friction of the slide in the mast is also important.
    That makes sense, the tape is tight.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Home Shropshire 6/12; boat Greece 6/12
    Posts
    10,415

    Default Re: Sail slides

    Having some play on the slide-attachment to sail allows the slug to adopt a reasonable position.
    I'd strongly recommend against using WD 40 or any other unseizing lubricant - only use a PTFE spray.
    Easy-sliding plastic slides are, I've found, too fragile for normal use and I've ended up with substituting an increasing number of Bainbridge oilite slides

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Greece (Aegean)
    Posts
    2,249

    Default Re: Sail slides

    Quote Originally Posted by Motor_Sailor View Post
    Well the drawing I have shows a shaped luff groove that would appear to be more suited for AO14 or AO15 slugs.
    My details say 8mm for a bolt rope, so round slugs of 8mm should work.

    But I would still go for a good clean and use of McLube. I know everyone has there own money saving alternative to McLube, but I've found nothing like it. It's not Silicone or PTFE (it's based on PFPE), and is an order of magnitude better than anything else.

    Attachment 72235
    +1

    I had this problem about 25+ years ago and was having to pull the main down as it was so stiff. I tried Holt Pro-Lube when raising the sail and thought it was a waste of time because it dried quickly and left no visible residue (i.e. seemed likely to do nothing). I went forward to pull the main down after short sail and was completely covered in sail material as it rattled down the track before I could even start pulling .

    I've used Pro-lube ever since and heard similar stories about McLube. I have tried other things over the years (e.g. Toolstation PTFE spray) but nothing came close. Try Holt Pro-lube if that's available but McLube is not.
    Last edited by Mistroma; 22-07-18 at 06:41.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
    Posts
    3,276

    Default Re: Sail slides

    I use Mr Sheen furniture polish on my sail slides and also spray it on as I hoist the main for the first time at he beginning of the season. I have also found that it helps with getting the furling headsail up as the luff is fairly tight in the 'groove'.

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