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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch01527 View Post
    I would be happy to take you out for a day if dates match up. PM me if interested.
    Will do, thanks for the kind offer. And for the Yacht Club info.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by Yellow Ballad View Post
    Yes, NUSC, like I say has to be the easiest sail in the channel from Cardiff as long as you follow the cones and cans either end and give any ships a wide berth in the river you'll be ok. (word of warning if you go in to the Pill don't go past the pontoon there's low power cables, but the river pontoon is where you want to be in a bilge). They don't charge for visitors but I'm sure if you buy a beer or two in the bar if it's open they wouldn't say no. If you see someone, pop over and say hello, I'm sure they will get the kettle on. If you call or email the club I'm sure someone can give you better information then me.

    Like I say not really much to do once your there, but an easy sail to break you in.

    Good luck with whatever you choose.
    Thanks, sounds like a good starter trio.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    *trip

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boat in Milford Haven
    Posts
    2,225

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by vodzurk View Post
    I'm only 2 seasons in on having a mobo in the BC... and the doomsayers almost threw me into not bothering.

    But I'm glad we did. This season we did Portishead > Swansea > Tenby and back @ ~300 miles and it was great! If next season goes well, we might be looking at a bigger boat!

    As others have said:

    • Watch the weather (in particular, I don't even bother going out if it's blowing a SW-erly).
    • Be aware of the tidal current. I've heard it can push 15mph in places (deciding not to call Portishead to ask why one of their buoys shot past us at maybe 15mph when we "weren't moving" was a good decision). A personal one too... if going between the Holm's... take care... the water really turned on us between them at one point and still unsure why.
    • Be aware of the tidal height, and how quickly it changes... I've heard horror stories of boats at anchor being dragged under by their own anchor. Possibly urban legend but hey. We use Navionics if anchoring, to determine against the nearest marker how much the water will drop, and then add some leeway.
    • If possible, stay out of the shipping lane. Saw a bunch of lads have engine failure a month back as a monster shipping container was bearing down on them. They weren't responding on radio either, but thankfully got towed out of the way pretty fast by a friendly mobo. If crossing near Bristol area, check for traffic with Bristol VTS.
    • If a bit green... check if there are any events going on before you go out... as packing into a lock when you're out of practice can be worrying.
    • Consider a spare/aux engine. Our main has failed twice, and we were glad of our aux (both times we contacted coastguard to set up 30-min checks as we limped in and they were utterly lovely at offering to tow us, but we managed without).
    • Probably not applicable - but don't depend on anywhere having petrol!
    • Call firing ranges if intending to cross, even if charts say you have right of way and don't need to.
    Quick look at Navionics says you sailed about 100 Nm off the rhumb lines to do that (direct passages and back about 200 Nm).

    Guess itís doable in a power boat or prefereable if you want to hug the shore for pleasure but be aware the OP is talking about slower and more weather-kindly sailing boats.

    These sail point to point to maximise the tides and minimise passage time.

    I think the 15mph tides and yachts being dragged under by their anchors are all urban legends thankfully.

    All engines on sailing yachts are auxiliary (the primary engines are the white flappy things up top).
    Last edited by bitbaltic; 15-09-18 at 20:07.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    1,120

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    I think the 15mph tides and yachts being dragged under by their anchors are all urban legends thankfully.
    ________________________________________
    It has happened! Yacht from Cardiff got the tide wrong arrived off Charston Rock approx 4 hours before HW, with no water in the Pill so anchored off Charston Rock with all chain! Tide rising fast and he could not release chain from post so called "Sara" from Beachley who arrived quickly, but with no cutting gear on board, quickly returned and collected bolt cutters to release his yacht and towed him safely into the Pill and safety!

    Photo 19-05-2018, 12 49 06 Charston rock.jpg
    Last edited by TOKOLOSHI; 16-09-18 at 07:07.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    966

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by Quimby View Post
    I think the 15mph tides and yachts being dragged under by their anchors are all urban legends thankfully.
    ________________________________________
    It has happened! Yacht from Cardiff got the tide wrong arrived off Charston Rock approx 4 hours before HW, with no water in the Pill so anchored off Charston Rock with all chain! Tide rising fast and he could not release chain from post so called "Sara" from Beachley who arrived quickly, but with no cutting gear on board, quickly returned and collected bolt cutters to release his yacht and towed him safely into the Pill and safety!Photo 19-05-2018, 12 49 06 Charston rock.jpg
    Heard about when I had moorings that way, but never got coherent details, though it was suggested the issue was that his anchor chain was too short thus pulling down as tide rose. Very approx vector of forces 20m of chain in 10m gives 30degree down towards bottom and half of the pull is down. If there is one ton of pull on chain thats like half ton sitting on the bows. 50m in 10m gives only 11 degrees and only one fifth of the pull is downward, so plausible explanation at least.

    So not quite Urban Legend but an urban exaggeration of an incident. I suspect he might well have been ok provided his cleats held and not too much water splashing over his bows, but frightening enough
    A boat is for going places

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boat in Milford Haven
    Posts
    2,225

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by Quimby View Post
    I think the 15mph tides and yachts being dragged under by their anchors are all urban legends thankfully.
    ________________________________________
    It has happened! Yacht from Cardiff got the tide wrong arrived off Charston Rock approx 4 hours before HW, with no water in the Pill so anchored off Charston Rock with all chain! Tide rising fast and he could not release chain from post so called "Sara" from Beachley who arrived quickly, but with no cutting gear on board, quickly returned and collected bolt cutters to release his yacht and towed him safely into the Pill and safety!

    Photo 19-05-2018, 12 49 06 Charston rock.jpg
    As oldmanofthehills says that is a case of two failures of seamanship:

    1) insufficient scope for the rise of tide anticipated before he could get in

    2) chain unreleaseable from the boat. We have 30m chain and 50m warp. The end of the warp has a hard eye and is lashed to the anchor locker with a simple dyneema lashing, easily cut.

    When the chain is out it is held by a chain hook on a line OXO to a cleat. When the warp goes out it is OXO around same cleat with no load on the anchor locker strong point in either case.

    Should I mis-read my scope then in the worst of circumstances I can easily cut the anchor locker lashing, release whatever is at the cleat and be free. If I mis-read my scope with all chain out, all I have to do is release the hook, pay out warp, and oxo the warp.

    If iím Out of warp I can get in anyways.

    Think stuff like this is in all the basic books eg tom Cunliffe.
    Last edited by bitbaltic; 18-09-18 at 17:28.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    Quote Originally Posted by bitbaltic View Post
    Quick look at Navionics says you sailed about 100 Nm off the rhumb lines to do that (direct passages and back about 200 Nm).

    Guess it’s doable in a power boat or prefereable if you want to hug the shore for pleasure but be aware the OP is talking about slower and more weather-kindly sailing boats.

    These sail point to point to maximise the tides and minimise passage time.
    Yep, we mostly hugged the coast... our planned routes were:
    (Navionics Link) Portishead > Swansea = 64.7m = 129.4m round.
    (Navionics Link Swansea > Milford Haven = 81.6m = 163.2m round.

    Total = 292.6m.

    However... we only made it to Tenby. That probably takes 60 miles off the total = 232m.
    But... we did go out for a ~90 min test run around Swansea after engine repairs @ ~ 20m = 252m.
    And... we did make quite a few detours during the trip... Port Talbot... Mooching around Porthcawl.
    And... we didn't stick perfectly to the route... primary engine failure had us limping in along the coast.

    ... so probably close to 300 miles (or 260nm).
    YouTube: Gorjus Boating
    Boat: Sealine 195

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,508

    Default Re: Advice on Bristol Channel boating

    I am not in a position to provide advice on the Bristol Channel as I have only been in the Bristol Channel for one year. We spend many years sailing the Solent, East Coast and West Pembrokeshire.

    In my opinion, although tides are strong, the tidal range is the determining factor. The majority of places that one would like to visit, dry out and therefore careful attention is needed in terms of timing, anchoring gear and more robust planning.

    I am sure it can get very rough in the BC especially when wind against the tide but for those who have sailed in the Solent, it can get very rough there, especially at the East entrance. But, we are enjoying the BC and sailing into Cardiff Bay is fun.

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