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  1. #61
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    SPAIN,Galicia
    Posts
    11,110

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tranona View Post
    Exactly. Almost all the boats featured here are pastiches of wooden boats which generally looked that way because of the characteristics of wood as a boat building material.

    If "classic" is being linked to a material (GRP) then perhaps it should feature boats that could not have been built in traditional wood, so are a classic use of GRP.

    I will kick off with a Sadler Barracuda - the very antithesis of most of the boats so far. I know the first was built of wood composite but its concept and shape were not determined by traditional wood.
    The French understood GRP and design

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,156

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wansworth View Post
    ....the ensign ought to be bigger ,just grazing the waterline.......IMVHO!
    That's naff.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,156

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tranona View Post
    Exactly. Almost all the boats featured here are pastiches of wooden boats which generally looked that way because of the characteristics of wood as a boat building material.

    If "classic" is being linked to a material (GRP) then perhaps it should feature boats that could not have been built in traditional wood, so are a classic use of GRP.

    I will kick off with a Sadler Barracuda - the very antithesis of most of the boats so far. I know the first was built of wood composite but its concept and shape were not determined by traditional wood.
    Are there any GRP yachts around which couldn't have been built in wood?
    It's funny how in the world of dinghies, a lot of people spent a lot of effort in the 60s and 70s trying to make plywood boats as close as possible to the round bilge shapes you can make from cold moulding or GRP. Now the most modern boats are all FRP, but are tending towards hard chine shapes (apart from a very sharp bow) which could easily be built in plywood.

    What dictates a lot of the shapes on show here is a legacy of rating rules, which have forced the cultural ideas of what a 'fast' yacht should look like. A culture of describing a yacht's size by its LWL rather than the amount of marina it takes up or its dead weight.

    Could someone have built a modern plumb-bow, fat-arse AWB shape in carvel before the war? I don't see why not. You'd need some internal structure to bolt the keel to, but that's only a logical step from an iron-plated dinghy. Maybe it wouldn't have worked with the rigs available? Maybe it would just have been thought fugly.

    So maybe it's all about some people wanting conservative styling , and few people around who would take bold steps? That hasn't really changed much ?

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    UK and NW Caribbean, Belize Mexico & Guatemala
    Posts
    344

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Lady Anne our 1970 Beaty 31 based on a Hinkley 31, a Sparkman and Stevens design from 1935
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Argyll
    Posts
    809

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Iíll have my man look into it ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    If you're going to have an ensign on a pole, surely the pole needs to be either vertical or aligned with the transom?
    Otherwise, one of my favourites!

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    31,980

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Turgidson View Post
    My little twister.
    She's getting a full set of fancy B&G instruments fitted this winter so her classic stowe towed log and seafarer flashing spinning depth sounder are available to anyone who wants period gear.
    Attachment 74082
    Attachment 74083
    That is a classic example of a wooden boat built in GRP. Its shape was determined largely by what you could build in wood.

    Fast forward a few years and then see what the same designer drew once he did not have the constraint of wood construction.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    31,980

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    Are there any GRP yachts around which couldn't have been built in wood?
    It's funny how in the world of dinghies, a lot of people spent a lot of effort in the 60s and 70s trying to make plywood boats as close as possible to the round bilge shapes you can make from cold moulding or GRP. Now the most modern boats are all FRP, but are tending towards hard chine shapes (apart from a very sharp bow) which could easily be built in plywood.

    What dictates a lot of the shapes on show here is a legacy of rating rules, which have forced the cultural ideas of what a 'fast' yacht should look like. A culture of describing a yacht's size by its LWL rather than the amount of marina it takes up or its dead weight.

    Could someone have built a modern plumb-bow, fat-arse AWB shape in carvel before the war? I don't see why not. You'd need some internal structure to bolt the keel to, but that's only a logical step from an iron-plated dinghy. Maybe it wouldn't have worked with the rigs available? Maybe it would just have been thought fugly.

    So maybe it's all about some people wanting conservative styling , and few people around who would take bold steps? That hasn't really changed much ?
    You have answered your own question. PLywood and cold moulding removed many of the constraints of "tree" wood and none of the pastiche wooden boats here (like the Twister) were built in plywood.

    You could not build an AWB with plank on frame construction and modern hull shapes only came about because of the characteristics of GRP and other composites including wood/epoxy.

    Apart from my suggestion nobody has proposed a classic GRP boat that does not have its roots in plank on frame except perhaps some of the transition fin and skeg boats of the 70's.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    905

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tranona View Post
    Apart from my suggestion nobody has proposed a classic GRP boat that does not have its roots in plank on frame except perhaps some of the transition fin and skeg boats of the 70's.
    Can you suggest any for us to admire?

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    God's Own County
    Posts
    6,255

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    This is mine. I like to think she has a classic look to her.
    Boat.jpg
    Avatar: Fudge (Gracefull Star) 26th November 2006 to 20th August 2014. My best friend. RIP

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,303

    Default Re: Classic GRP Yachts; this is mine, where is yours?

    Tranona; Apart from my suggestion nobody has proposed a classic GRP boat that does not have its roots in plank on frame except perhaps some of the transition fin and skeg boats of the 70's.[/QUOTE]

    We need to consider some of the Westerlys and Moodys of the late 70's and early 80's; for example, Westerly Discus and Moody 33, both of which have deviated from the constraints of the timber design

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