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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Home - Sothampton, Boat - Gosport
    Posts
    9,096

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    Over the last two weeks in October I did IJmuiden - Nuremberg - Augsburg - Munich - Freiburg - Mulhouse (for the day) - Lucerne (for the day) - Utrecht - IJmuiden in the DS. Over 2,000 miles in total. I do now take it to a specialist for an annual check-over and titivation.
    Back in the day, that was a car I always wanted, but they had an unenviable reputation for unreliability, especially those few in my budget. I suspect a well restored one now would be more reliable than a new one back then maintained by Citroen's "engineers" They're certainly one of the most comfortable cars I've ever been in. Am I right in thinking that RR use the same suspension under licence from Citroen?
    Steve
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    17,893

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by John100156 View Post
    My memory is fading but didn't they have the SU or shallower Stronberg(?) carbs. I recall a similar problem when you take the tops off (use to fill the plunger with oil as I recall) they has a rubber diaphragm which if cracked could be the problem.
    Zenith Strombergs on the Herald 13/60. Diaphragm fine, dashpot filled, needle valve changed, fuel pump changed, fuel pipes new.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    17,893

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by escapism View Post
    PS. Why do old Triumphs show crossed SV flags on the quarter?
    Nobody knows. It was Michelotti who specified them for the convertibles (and I think the coupés) so they may stand for something in Italian.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Home UK Midlands / Boat Croatia
    Posts
    16,425

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by escapism View Post
    PS. Why do old Triumphs show crossed SV flags on the quarter?
    I'll wager that it was Super Speed ..... but in Italian.

    Either that or ...... On the nose was a large "V" (for Vignale) badge, a "by G. Michelotti" badge on the bonnet, small "Vignale" scripts and a cloisonné Vignale-badge on the front wings, "Triumph Italia" on the rear wings with a set of Vignale crossed-flags (these are very similar to the ones on the S-T Vignale Vanguard, they are nautical flags for "V" and "S," the "S" presumably for Standard-Triumph), a large Vignale script on the boot handle and a "Triumph 2000" script on the boot. After the first 13, Ruffino took over production on an assembly line he leased from Vignale for the remainder of production.

    Richard
    Last edited by RichardS; 06-11-18 at 10:08.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    17,893

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stemar View Post
    Back in the day, that was a car I always wanted, but they had an unenviable reputation for unreliability, especially those few in my budget. I suspect a well restored one now would be more reliable than a new one back then maintained by Citroen's "engineers"
    The trouble was always more rust than reliability, though the electrics depend more on crossed fingers than Ohm's Law. Very French. The hydraulics just do their stuff. I'm told that they generally lasted about 4 years in the UK before terminal rot took them to the scrappy, so not much chance for the mechanics to cause problems. Good maintenance now is mostly a matter of squirting Dinitrol into every possible place on a regular basis. Servicing is not as bad as you might expect, but it's a complicated 1957 design which mean a lot of steps to do anything. I have changed the clutch on my own, which was a full day's work to get the engine out, a full day's work to replace the clutch and a full day's work to get everything back together. You have to remove the front wings, drive shafts, radiator and air ducts, front suspension spheres, battery cage, hydraulic reservoir, steering rack, steering column and more just to get at the engine ...

    They're certainly one of the most comfortable cars I've ever been in. Am I right in thinking that RR use the same suspension under licence from Citroen?
    They did, certainly, but I don't know if they still do. The one bit they didn't licence was the brake valve under the "mushroom" which replaces a pedal. It's a remarkably complicated little gadget as it contains valves or the front and rear brake circuits and a slider which biasses braking to the back when the rear suspension is heavily loaded.



    Rolls-Royce thought they could do better, but never managed to come up with one which didn't leak. In teh end they stopped trying and specified a disposable nappy to be placed on the undertray below the valve and changed at each service. The Citroën valve never leaks ...
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    16,960

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    One thing I took great pleasure from when owning a boat was the upgrading and maintenance, not everyones bag I know, but that is what I enjoyed. So when the boat went I bought a S2 Alfa Romeo Spider, the one I bought is a Junior, there are only a handfull of them still in existance, its a cross between the later Kamm tail and the earlier Duetto. Since owning it (the bodywork had already been restored with a bare metal respray,) I started to restore and rebuild all the mechanics. I have rebuilt the front suspension and last year the gearbox, a gearbox which I was not familiar with, likewise the spare rear axle which is on the bench at the moment. Not only am I getting pleasure from the actual mechanical work but also scouring the world for original parts.

    Someone mentioned reliability, most of these classic cars can be fixed on the side of the road, no need to plug a computer in to reset an ECU to get it going again.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Sans Bateau; 06-11-18 at 11:19.
    'The will of the people' = The will of a few fanatics who have duped the unsuspecting.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    17,893

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sans Bateau View Post
    One thing I took great pleasure from when owning a boat was the upgrading and maintenance, not everyones bag I know, but that is what I enjoyed. So when the boat went I bought a S2 Alfa Romeo Spider, the one I bought is a Junior, there are only a handfull of them still in existance, its a cross between the later Kamm tail and the earlier Duetto. Since owning it (the bodywork had already been restored with a bare metal respray,) I started to restore and rebuild all the mechanics. I have rebuilt the front suspension and last year the gearbox, a gearbox which I was not familiar with, likewise the spare rear axle which is on the bench at the moment. Not only am I getting pleasure from the actual mechanical work but also scouring the world for original parts.
    A friend of mine had the slightly later one. After he had owned it for a few years, a mechanic servicing it noticed that the rear brakes were completely disconnected - as in, a blanking plug in the hydraulic line to them. It had passed six MOTs under his ownership like that, at various MOT stations, which shows just how assiduously or competently MOT testers carry out the road test they are supposed to do in place of a roller test when an LSD is fitted.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    16,960

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    The trouble was always more rust than reliability, though the electrics depend more on crossed fingers than Ohm's Law. Very French. The hydraulics just do their stuff. I'm told that they generally lasted about 4 years in the UK before terminal rot took them to the scrappy, so not much chance for the mechanics to cause problems. Good maintenance now is mostly a matter of squirting Dinitrol into every possible place on a regular basis. Servicing is not as bad as you might expect, but it's a complicated 1957 design which mean a lot of steps to do anything. I have changed the clutch on my own, which was a full day's work to get the engine out, a full day's work to replace the clutch and a full day's work to get everything back together. You have to remove the front wings, drive shafts, radiator and air ducts, front suspension spheres, battery cage, hydraulic reservoir, steering rack, steering column and more just to get at the engine ...
    .
    Many of the French cars in the 70's and 80's had very complex maintenance procedures, when I owned a garage in this period I soon realised there was lots of money to be made as the average workshop only want easy repairs, Vauxhall, Ford, Leyland. The French and other European makes allowed a premium to be charged.
    'The will of the people' = The will of a few fanatics who have duped the unsuspecting.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sans Bateau View Post
    Many of the French cars in the 70's and 80's had very complex maintenance procedures, when I owned a garage in this period I soon realised there was lots of money to be made as the average workshop only want easy repairs, Vauxhall, Ford, Leyland. The French and other European makes allowed a premium to be charged.
    Was not that one of our big problems, marketing could only sell cheap cars, premium was hard work, When BL introduced electronic dashes the media ran it it down, only for it to appear on premium European cars after we scrap it. What we cannot see is a premium spec allows you to sell it at a premium price, thus R&D, production and sales costs. Think, BMW pre tax profits are around 10 billion Euro, what UK manufacture can say the same, but if we had one, how long before we heard the UK media and politicians shouting excessive profits ?

    Brian
    Kddpowercentre VASR charge

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2,545

    Default Re: Anyone drive a MK2 Cortina?

    Quote Originally Posted by jordanbasset View Post
    Those were the days, when you completed a long drive you had a sense of achievement if the car actually got you there without a problem
    I still get that with my modernish Range Rover
    If found in the Brexit forum, please return to the real world.

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