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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Over here
    Posts
    607

    Default Cruise provisioning

    My mind is starting to wander towards the first cruise of the year and looking for your provisioning/recipe ideas for a week's cruise. On board fridge is more a coolbox so not the best at keeping stuff cold.

    So beyond fray bentos pies, tinned haggis and corned beef - what's your staples for cooking on board?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fortrose
    Posts
    1,420

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Rice, potatoes, bouillon powder, chorizo, parmesan, tomatoes and puree, par-baked bread, onions, garlic and mushrooms. Spices with black pepper, salt, paprika, curry and cumin.
    Really easy to have a very varied and simple set of meals.
    Folkboat 'Stakkr' - Inverness - http://islandrov.wix.com/island-rov-web

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
    Posts
    7,345

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Tins are OK for 'filling the gaps' but not usually necessary

    If you are going to be stopping places on the way, you can top up at those with fresh provisions, and ice for the coolbox.

    For keeping milk etc. cool, we used to stand it in a bucket at the back of the cockpit, with a few inches of water and a tea-towel or piece of muslin draped over the milk and dangling in the water. (It cools by evaporation.) We'd also put butter and cheese, each in a small tupperware type box, in the bucket.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    21,570

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    That's a tricky one. It's nearly twenty years since we sailed without a fridge, which makes a big difference in that you can usually feed on fresh food. I don't think any made-up or packaged food ever lives up to expectations, so my suggestion, in a subject that is outside my normal range of knowledge, is to stock up with the usual tinned meats, ham, sardines and tuna, and use your imagination to render them interesting in the manner of stir-fries, risottos, stews, curries and the like.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,757

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Quote Originally Posted by scruff View Post
    My mind is starting to wander towards the first cruise of the year and looking for your provisioning/recipe ideas for a week's cruise. On board fridge is more a coolbox so not the best at keeping stuff cold.

    So beyond fray bentos pies, tinned haggis and corned beef - what's your staples for cooking on board?
    Gin, rum.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Greenwich
    Posts
    7,160

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    From previous discussions on the topic it is the same question as “what should I buy for my weekly shop at home?”

    Only you can answer how often you eat out, how much you like cooking and what your tastes are.

    On a weeks trip we probably eat out 4 times, cold Greek / French style lunches and nice wine and a cooked meal at anchor 3 nights. On passage at night it’s always a hot meal - simplistically of rough and nicer if at all calm.

    Obviously avoid Fray Bentos, corned beef and parsnips as you aren’t a time traveller to the time of rationing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Plymouth
    Posts
    8,283

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Potatoes, never go without potatoes. Chosen with care, they will last half a season and more.

    Tomatoes also last a month as they are blasted with X rays or some such before packaging, they are great for breakfast, fried in olive oil - or indeed as a side to most meals. Peppers are no problem, choose firm green for maximum life.

    Fresh eggs last at least 2 months. Butter a month as long as you do not actually let it melt. Good old wholemeal sliced bread will last a week. Cheese is tricky but Babybel is not bad with a bit of pickle, biscuits and a glass of (warm) red. Fresh fruit will often last as long as it takes to eat it, so sweet puddins are sorted, esp if you have honey or yoghurt - which also does not mind being unchilled.

    Porridge is great for breakfast and in sweets. Soya mince is fine with pasta, and risotto as are those small tins of chicken in white sauce. Iceberg lettuce lasts well, I always have a good dressing and have salad with most meals. Spag Bol mixture can be bought in France with the meat already added, can't think why this is so difficult in the UK.

    Coastal cruising this side of the Channel, the only thing you will miss is icy beer. Buy Bass.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    35,838

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Quote Originally Posted by doug748 View Post
    Potatoes, never go without potatoes. Chosen with care, they will last half a season and more.

    Tomatoes also last a month as they are blasted with X rays or some such before packaging, they are great for breakfast, fried in olive oil - or indeed as a side to most meals. Peppers are no problem, choose firm green for maximum life.

    Fresh eggs last at least 2 months. Butter a month as long as you do not actually let it melt. Good old wholemeal sliced bread will last a week. Cheese is tricky but Babybel is not bad with a bit of pickle, biscuits and a glass of (warm) red. Fresh fruit will often last as long as it takes to eat it, so sweet puddins are sorted, esp if you have honey or yoghurt - which also does not mind being unchilled.

    Porridge is great for breakfast and in sweets. Soya mince is fine with pasta, and risotto as are those small tins of chicken in white sauce. Iceberg lettuce lasts well, I always have a good dressing and have salad with most meals. Spag Bol mixture can be bought in France with the meat already added, can't think why this is so difficult in the UK.

    Coastal cruising this side of the Channel, the only thing you will miss is icy beer. Buy Bass.
    I prefer to catch my own bass.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chichester Harbour
    Posts
    376

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    In addition to already said: Couscous, dried mashed potato, dried mushrooms, longlife nann breads, long life tortilla wraps, part baked bread rolls, 7 day keep white sliced bread, risotto rice (produces less steam when cooking), pasta but does create a lot of steam, quick cook polenta, powdered milk, long life milk, eggs, onions and any other veg that keeps well, nuts, seeds, and dried fruit, stock cubes, dried herbs, oils (rapeseed and olive) instead of butters/spreads, tinned fruit, condensed milk, long life little tubs of deserts for the kids. Tinned tuna, sardines and quality tinned meatballs. I vaguely recall that babybel cheeses keep ok out of the fridge for a while.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    3,035

    Default Re: Cruise provisioning

    Long life milk lasts six months before it’s opened and a few days without a fridge after. I carry about 12 cartons and work through them over a season.

    Museli, corn flakes, porridge _ just add milk (see above).

    Dried pasta, corned beef, chorizo. Cans of soup.

    Brie lasts a week. Stilton longer. TUG biscutes are indestructible if kept dry!

    “Look what we found” reheatable meals are actually rather nice (off the shelf in Waitrose).

    Or in desperation ... Pot Noodle!

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