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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,726

    Default Changing the angle of the babystay

    Bit of a hypothetical question, for now, but curious to see if I'm missing anything.
    One of the downsides of a babystay is that it makes your usable foredeck area much smaller. For my intended cruising plans, I want to have a hard tender (or RIB) mounted on davits for day to day storage, and put on the foredeck for longer (multi day) passages.

    What I am considering is making an extension for the babystay, so that it can be anchored further up the foredeck, likely at the bow chainplate itself unless another location seemed easier. This would be a reversible arrangement- the original babystay chainplate would remain in place, and the extension piece could be removed to revert the rig to the original plan.
    The obvious downside of this arrangement is that tacking the headsail becomes much harder, and you would probably need to furl it and unfurl it each time. But as I said, this arrangement would be for use on long multi-day passages where you would a) hopefully not be beating anyway; and b) be in open water where you might only change tack every few days.

    What I'm not too sure about is the effect on the rig. Obviously you would need the babystay tang to have sufficient articulation to cope with the change in angle, but the way that the mast is held in column might be slightly different, and the loadings on the babystay attachment on the mast would be somewhat more in tension than in shear. But I might be overthinking things!

    Any thoughts?
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,123

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelpie View Post
    Bit of a hypothetical question, for now, but curious to see if I'm missing anything.
    One of the downsides of a babystay is that it makes your usable foredeck area much smaller. For my intended cruising plans, I want to have a hard tender (or RIB) mounted on davits for day to day storage, and put on the foredeck for longer (multi day) passages.

    What I am considering is making an extension for the babystay, so that it can be anchored further up the foredeck, likely at the bow chainplate itself unless another location seemed easier. This would be a reversible arrangement- the original babystay chainplate would remain in place, and the extension piece could be removed to revert the rig to the original plan.
    The obvious downside of this arrangement is that tacking the headsail becomes much harder, and you would probably need to furl it and unfurl it each time. But as I said, this arrangement would be for use on long multi-day passages where you would a) hopefully not be beating anyway; and b) be in open water where you might only change tack every few days.

    What I'm not too sure about is the effect on the rig. Obviously you would need the babystay tang to have sufficient articulation to cope with the change in angle, but the way that the mast is held in column might be slightly different, and the loadings on the babystay attachment on the mast would be somewhat more in tension than in shear. But I might be overthinking things!

    Any thoughts?
    My thoughts would be that for multi day passages you might deflate the RIB and store it elsewhere.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,629

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    I don't think that moving the stay forward would make a huge difference at its attachment up the mast. Is it a permanent part of the support system for the mast? The reason for asking is that I have something similar, but it is only used for rigging a storm jib, so while it has a properly designed and adequate attachment point, in practice it spends its life attached much closer to the mast, and out of the way.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    2,057

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelpie View Post
    Bit of a hypothetical question, for now, but curious to see if I'm missing anything.
    One of the downsides of a babystay is that it makes your usable foredeck area much smaller. For my intended cruising plans, I want to have a hard tender (or RIB) mounted on davits for day to day storage, and put on the foredeck for longer (multi day) passages.

    What I am considering is making an extension for the babystay, so that it can be anchored further up the foredeck, likely at the bow chainplate itself unless another location seemed easier. This would be a reversible arrangement- the original babystay chainplate would remain in place, and the extension piece could be removed to revert the rig to the original plan.
    The obvious downside of this arrangement is that tacking the headsail becomes much harder, and you would probably need to furl it and unfurl it each time. But as I said, this arrangement would be for use on long multi-day passages where you would a) hopefully not be beating anyway; and b) be in open water where you might only change tack every few days.

    What I'm not too sure about is the effect on the rig. Obviously you would need the babystay tang to have sufficient articulation to cope with the change in angle, but the way that the mast is held in column might be slightly different, and the loadings on the babystay attachment on the mast would be somewhat more in tension than in shear. But I might be overthinking things!

    Any thoughts?
    How much space do you have in front of the existing baby stay for a dinghy? Our hard nesting dinghy sits in front of the baby stay. Nested we only have a 7’ dinghy. Jointed its 12’5”. Do you really need to move the babystay. We dont have davits as we have a Duogen, a Windpilot and a boarding ladder on the transom. We tow the dinghy between islands as its drag isnt even noticeable (a big advantage of a light long hard dinghy) compared to our previous rib that was like towing a bus with a flat tyre!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,726

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    Quote Originally Posted by bbg View Post
    My thoughts would be that for multi day passages you might deflate the RIB and store it elsewhere.
    Even deflated, the hull is going to be quite a big lump to store, and the length is going to be almost the same, minus whatever the diameter of the bow tube.
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In Transit
    Posts
    3,580

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    a baby stay solution used by some moody owners (described on the Moody Owners association website) is to add another sturdy mast tang a few feet higher then the original mast attachment than move the deck chain-plate (eye) to the anchor windlass well. This makes the new baby stay parallel with the forestay and can be used for a inner staysail it is good with a reefed main for windy conditions. Also space for a dinghy without fouling the anchor arrangements, It also solves the baby-stay deck lifting problem.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,726

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post
    How much space do you have in front of the existing baby stay for a dinghy? Our hard nesting dinghy sits in front of the baby stay. Nested we only have a 7’ dinghy. Jointed its 12’5”. Do you really need to move the babystay. We dont have davits as we have a Duogen, a Windpilot and a boarding ladder on the transom. We tow the dinghy between islands as its drag isnt even noticeable (a big advantage of a light long hard dinghy) compared to our previous rib that was like towing a bus with a flat tyre!
    Haven't quite finalised purchase of the boat yet, so don't have that measurement to hand. It will all depend on the dinghy we choose, but that's a bit chicken and egg since deck space is obviously one consideration.
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    up on the moors.
    Posts
    32,922

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    I move mine sideways so that it fastens to the inner shroud attachment point with a cord.. (Genoa sheets run outside the shrouds.)
    I think, therefore I am. I am, therefore I sail.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,726

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    The babystay on this boat is definitely a permanent part of the rig. There are no forward lowers.
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,629

    Default Re: Changing the angle of the babystay

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelpie View Post
    The babystay on this boat is definitely a permanent part of the rig. There are no forward lowers.
    In that case, don't mess with it!

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