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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West of Scotland
    Posts
    2,976

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldmanofthehills View Post
    If I was rich enough or foolish enough to pay marina fees ...
    OK - I have got to ask … I understand that you aren't rich enough to pay marina fees, but why does that make those of us who can afford to pay marina fees foolish?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    21,295

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteCooper View Post
    OK - I have got to ask … I understand that you aren't rich enough to pay marina fees, but why does that make those of us who can afford to pay marina fees foolish?
    Speaking on behalf of the old boy I have to say that I can remember that in the days when we had a swinging mooring I probably held the same views. If you are fit and able and can enjoy the benefits that a mooring can offer, you do tend to view marina fees as a needless extravagance, though I have to admit to having been 'foolish' for the last twenty years. On a mooring you are master of all you survey and can enjoy the peace and nature around you and might well be prepared not to be able to step aboard in the knowledge that you are effectively pocketing some thousands of pounds tax-free per year.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    35,564

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldmanofthehills View Post
    Taking a biggish genoa down from the roller furler and folding it is hard on a smallish boat, and I cant easily do it on the moorings, so have to motor 45 minutes to pontoon. It also takes a time which could be more enjoyable used for more sailing, and fills up the saloon so we easily cant sit down. If I was rich enough or foolish enough to pay marina fees and had sail storage at home then that would be different. The new sacrificial strip was £230 and should last 5 years or more, and its job is to protect sail for me, not vice versa. Double gaskets round the sail in autumn or spring, and headsail off in January after our boxing day sail and back on in March, so any usage until then will need engine for motion and sailbags for seating.
    Similar here.
    Struggling to drop and fold a big genoa on the deck singlehanded isn't exactly the kindest thing for the sail either.

    But even a F10 does not instantly unwrap a moderately secure genoa, the ones I've seen trashed are on boats that either don't get looked at for months on end in the autumn and winter, or the sails are badly stowed to start with.
    I put 3 or 4 turns of something like 6mm line around the genoa through the clew eye.
    After a couple of days of strong wind, I've often notice the sail is not quite as neat as it started out. Sorting it between blows stops it getting out of hand. The same genoa has been up for about 8 of the last 10 winters and lived through some blows in a fairly exposed bit of Portsmouth Harbour.
    But I start to panic if the boat goes more than a fortnight without at least one of us checking it out.
    Not just because of the genoa, but also the mooring, batteries, bilge, checking it hasn't been rammed or colonised by gulls or oiks from Turk Town....

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West of Scotland
    Posts
    2,976

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    Speaking on behalf of the old boy I have to say that I can remember that in the days when we had a swinging mooring I probably held the same views. If you are fit and able and can enjoy the benefits that a mooring can offer, you do tend to view marina fees as a needless extravagance, though I have to admit to having been 'foolish' for the last twenty years. On a mooring you are master of all you survey and can enjoy the peace and nature around you and might well be prepared not to be able to step aboard in the knowledge that you are effectively pocketing some thousands of pounds tax-free per year.
    It seems an odd thing to pick out as a 'needless extravagance' - I have loads of needless extravagances - and if I didn't pay marina fees I wouldn't use my boat as much. If I can afford the fees I still don't see why it's foolish.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,455

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    I keep sailing most of the winter. I switch to an old no.2 in the furler in October and use it over the winter. With the sun slipping behind the mountains at around 3pm in Dec and Jan I really want to get the most out of a winter sail. It's one thing taking it for granted that race crew will be happy to flake two or three headsails when you get back in, but another making casual cruising crew flake a headsail on the pontoon as it gets dark and the temperature drops and they would rather be heading home. So it stays in the furler. It's an old sail - although I will buy a new no.2 when it finally gives up.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    21,295

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteCooper View Post
    It seems an odd thing to pick out as a 'needless extravagance' - I have loads of needless extravagances - and if I didn't pay marina fees I wouldn't use my boat as much. If I can afford the fees I still don't see why it's foolish.
    I don't think that I said that being in a marina was necessarily foolish but that those who sail from moorings can easily view it that way. Similarly, northerners might view those who live in the expensive and crowded south-east as foolish, and they would be entitled to feel this way, and express it. That doesn't mean that my fellow-southerners are all idiots, though it is possible you might disagree.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,419

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    20181103_131202.jpg

    I remove the Genoa when the boat comes out of the water for winter. I don't always remove the main, however, its always covered up. However, I always lock (see picture) the furler when I leave the boat even during summer and I wrap the sheets around a few turns.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    11,755

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    I've given up winter sailing so all the sails come off, normally early October. As I do it on my own and am on a fore and aft river mooring, I have to wait for a day when there's not too much wind and it's blowing in the right direction, folding the genoa is a bugger, so I do it roughly then take it to my village hall to fold it properly.
    Hoisting it in Spring is the hardest job, I have to put a turn on the mast winch then bring the halyard forward to the electric windlass, then with a foot on the windlass button, a hand to tail the halyard and a hand to feed the sail into the furler track and a lot of swearing, the genoa eventually goes up.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
    Facilitated by AWESEM WP Agency

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    3,548

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    I have a dry sailing contract so my boat sits in the yard except for the 3 or 4 times a year she is in the water for a month or six weeks. When she is in the yard I remove the sails so that they will last longer
    'To lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe' (EC Treaty)

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Iíve seldom removed either mainsail or Genoa during the winter months. My reasoning has been that the mainsail is adequately protected in its sail bag on the boom and similarly the Genoa rolled up on its spar is equally secure. The only additional security measure that I take is to ensure that the furling drum cannot rotate. This is achieved by the application of additional lashings and then relaxing the tension on the furling line itself.
    Living aboard for the bulk of recent years, I have witnessed many headsails on other yachts that have become unfurled. Particularly through the winter months. Being of a curious nature I have usually taken the opportunity to investigate the cause of such events. Without exception it has turned out that the furling drum has been released because a furling line has either slipped through a clutch or fretted through. Usually the latter cause. There are obviously several points in a furling lineís path to the cockpit where abrasion can occur.
    Mike.

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