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  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Second Coast, Ross-shire, overlooking Gruinard Bay.
    Posts
    7,019

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by doug748 View Post
    If it must be left on, this is probably the best way to tackle it.

    Also useful even if you remove your sail, I picked up this tip on the forum only last year: Wrapping the halyard around the foil helps prevent the naked extrusion from oscillating wildly in strong winds by shedding vortices.

    See the photo of the helical chimney stack strake, on this page:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vortex_shedding

    It's not a great idea to loosen the backstay much either, esp if it leaves the forestay saggy
    I never realised that the helical "flanges" up a chimney were to prevent vortex damage - I thought it was something to do with enhancing the exiting flow-speed from the top of the chimney to get the nasty stuff higher and more speedily.

    One lives and one learns
    Kay Sarah Sarah
    57°51.42' N 5°29.44' W

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Bristol Channel
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteCooper View Post
    OK - I have got to ask … I understand that you aren't rich enough to pay marina fees, but why does that make those of us who can afford to pay marina fees foolish?
    My mooring/club fees costs me and the Navigator about £250pa per boat in fixed costs, so why pay £3000 to a marina when it can go to saving for different boat, ski holidays, climbing trips etc? IMHO marinas are where boats go to die, often owned by bosses with little understanding or care for sailors or indeed boats provided that they get their rents (though the staff often are ok). Harbour masters are almost all helpful by comparison, and boat owners with moorings need to attend all the time and thus incidentally keep up their sailorly skills in dealing with such moorings. A boat on moorings in a good spot is a thing of beauty; A boat in a marina is a piece of plastic in a "car park". No doubt when I am older and frailer I might consider a marina beneficial in the unlikely event that I can afford it but similarly I might need a commode in my bedroom and I don't look forward to that either.
    A boat is for going places

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    21,053

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilson View Post
    I never realised that the helical "flanges" up a chimney were to prevent vortex damage - I thought it was something to do with enhancing the exiting flow-speed from the top of the chimney to get the nasty stuff higher and more speedily.

    One lives and one learns
    It's the same reasoning that applies to overhead telephone cables, the bigger ovoid ones. When they are erected the cables aren't unreeled but are pulled off the side of the drum so there's lots of twists. It stops the cables from "dancing" in high winds.
    We always twist a halyard round out Tuff Luff for the same reason. When we had a furling jib we always put extra ties on as well as spiraling a halyard round it as well. With bad forecasts the sail came off altogether.
    If I'd wanted to live in a Banana Republic I'd have gone to South America.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
    Posts
    5,232

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    H
    Quote Originally Posted by oldmanofthehills View Post
    MHO marinas are where boats go to die, often owned by bosses with little understanding or care for sailors or indeed boats provided that they get their rents (though the staff often are ok). Harbour masters are almost all helpful by comparison, and boat owners with moorings need to attend all the time and thus incidentally keep up their sailorly skills in dealing with such moorings. A boat on moorings in a good spot is a thing of beauty; A boat in a marina is a piece of plastic in a "car park".
    A pretty comprehensive set of un-founded prejudices - and nicely off topic too.
    No point in trying to apply facts though. It’s just like the “modern GRP boats can’t cross oceans”, which I found rather amusing when surveying the fleets of modern GRB boats in the Carribean that had crossed safely from all continents

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Bristol Channel
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by dunedin View Post
    H A pretty comprehensive set of un-founded prejudices - and nicely off topic too.
    Someone asked why I don't like marinas; I answered. Did I touch a nerve? By the way I have nothing against GRP at all and would happily upgrade to some more modern boats if I had oodles of money. I just would not keep it in a marina
    A boat is for going places

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Med
    Posts
    5,624

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldmanofthehills View Post
    My mooring/club fees costs me and the Navigator about £250pa per boat in fixed costs, so why pay £3000 to a marina when it can go to saving for different boat, ski holidays, climbing trips etc? IMHO marinas are where boats go to die, often owned by bosses with little understanding or care for sailors or indeed boats provided that they get their rents (though the staff often are ok). Harbour masters are almost all helpful by comparison, and boat owners with moorings need to attend all the time and thus incidentally keep up their sailorly skills in dealing with such moorings. A boat on moorings in a good spot is a thing of beauty; A boat in a marina is a piece of plastic in a "car park". No doubt when I am older and frailer I might consider a marina beneficial in the unlikely event that I can afford it but similarly I might need a commode in my bedroom and I don't look forward to that either.
    You just have to laugh at times , with some people replies .
    Now what was this topic about before we got onto car parks and commode ?
    Warning forumite dyslexia near by
    www.bluewatersailorcroatia.webs.com

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Med
    Posts
    5,624

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    This is what got me started , by the way the halyard you can see , was around the furling , it had to be removed so part of the sail that was smacking the next boat could be removed
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Warning forumite dyslexia near by
    www.bluewatersailorcroatia.webs.com

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    18,897

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by savageseadog View Post
    I've seen furling jibs unfurl in storms many times, sometimes damaging more than just the sail. When I suggest to put extra ties on or take sails off prior to bad weather people often just don't believe it can happen.
    My jib stays on all summer, with five turns of sheet round it and a further tie through the clew. It's taking a reasonably minimised chance ... and I have a spare jib ...

    The main stays on as well, flaked and lashed down and with a sail cover on top. I don't worry about it.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    21,570

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    My jib stays on all summer, with five turns of sheet round it and a further tie through the clew. It's taking a reasonably minimised chance ... and I have a spare jib ...

    The main stays on as well, flaked and lashed down and with a sail cover on top. I don't worry about it.
    I don't suppose they get much wind up in your part of the world, but I have seen furled jibs come to grief when the wind has caught a small loose flap halfway up and found a weakness in the stitching, ripping the sail apart. This is why some of us use the spinnaker-halyard precaution.

    We don't see as many jib-covers these days. They can flog like mad if not tightened sufficiently, and even then they may oscillate alarmingly. I devised my halyard system when I used a cover, later abandoned.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    18,897

    Default Re: Do you remove your head sail?

    Quote Originally Posted by RupertW View Post
    The mitigation is as others have said - furl well so not even a corner is sticking out.
    I am constantly surprised by the number of people who leave their boats in marinas and on moorings with a foot of headsail unfurled in a triangle. Where did this idea come from? It's traditional on the Clyde to use a triangle of headsail as a proxy for a motoring cone, but that's under supervision and under way.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

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