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  1. #11
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    I wondered if the “C” class flying boat seen afloat (odd - portholes for passengers and a tarpaulin over what might be a forward turret under construction?) might be “Maia”? - but she is not.
    Might it be covering up the hatch that these flying boats used to have in the bow from where a mooring could be picked up?Flying boat.jpg

  2. #12
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    I now think the flying boat seen afloat is an early Sunderland, perhaps a prototype. The bow was modified in trials to take a Frazer Nash turret which could slide back for mooring, and perhaps that is what is going on under the cover.

    I have an American friend, Ian McColgin, who relates that his father, having commanded a bomber squadron in WW2, was happy to join Pan Am's Sky Gods, on demobilisation, as Sixth Officer (!) on flying boats; one of his tasks was indeed to open the nose hatch, take out the boathook, and either find the buoy and moor up or drop the anchor- on one occasion the Captain cut all engines short of the mooring and Sixth Officer McColgin executed a perfect dive from the bow platform and swam to the buoy with the painter. His mother having spent the war as a ferry pilot was graciously permitted to become a stewardess...
    Last edited by Minn; 15-02-19 at 21:46.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    I read somewhere that the very popular CQR anchor was designed by Professor Geoffrey Taylor for use by flying boats.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    I read somewhere that the very popular CQR anchor was designed by Professor Geoffrey Taylor for use by flying boats.
    correct. My father worked on the Sunderland, possibly making the floats. I believe there were workshops in tunnels around the Rochester area
    Last edited by sailorman; 15-02-19 at 20:05.
    Brexit: ‘taking back’ what we had never lost, in order to lose everything we had...

  5. #15
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    Kent
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    I lived in a house on the old Blaw Knox site which backed onto the tunnels, never went exploring but lots did.


  6. #16
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    The Sunderlands were equipped with CQR anchors, with special Baby Blake WCs with aluminium castings in place of bronze, with Taylor’s paraffin stoves and with “Grabit” boathooks, but the CQR was actually developed by Professor Taylor for use on his own yacht. There’s his own account of his invention in the January 1938 “Yachting Monthly”. The anchor that was developed for seaplanes and later used for yachts was the Northill, which was invented by Northrop, as in Northrop Grumman.

    Catalinas and Pan American Boeing flying boats had Northills, Imperial Airways “Empire” flying boats and Sunderlands had CQRs!

    Last edited by Minn; 15-02-19 at 21:48.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Kent
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    1,268

    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    H65 the Naval ship seen in the last few minutes I have just found out was HMS Boadicea, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Boadicea_(H65) Interesting career.
    Jim

    Now Boatless

  8. #18
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    Nov 2001
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    Medway
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    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    Those tunnels and those of Fort Clarence , immediately above, were the somewhat dangerous playgrounds of certain posters in early 1960s.
    Remains of one wooden ramp and a concrete hard, now occupied buy Medway Rowing club,still remain along the Esplanade.
    In the early 1960s some small derelict naval craft, poss corvettes and minesweepers were still moored just above what is now RCC.
    Being the Medway Towns everything not bolted down on the boats had been "liberated" by the locals.
    Last edited by oldgit; 16-02-19 at 09:49.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Hampshire
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    311

    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    Fasinating film, thanks for posting it. My uncle who was killed in December 1943 was in Coastal Command and flew in Sunderlands so to see them was particularly interesting.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
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    Weybridge, UK
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    731

    Default Re: The Medway 1938. BFI Film .

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    I wondered if the flying boat seen afloat (odd - portholes for passengers and a tarpaulin over what might be a forward turret under construction?) might be “Maia”? - but she is not.



    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_Mayo_Composite
    I think that is a Sunderland. The forward turret could be slid back into the fuselage to provide a forward cockpit (nautical) for mooring. It would be reasonable to rig a canvas cover over this to keep the rain out if moored for a while. The portholes are also right for a Sunderland, including the three under the wing where there was a hatch to allow the bomb racks to slide out.
    Dave Seager
    Weybridge UK

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