Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 38 of 38
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    2,820

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    Quote Originally Posted by tillergirl View Post
    Oh dear I shall give up trying irony and pathos. I was merely trying to underline the 'author's' implication that the running costs of a large twin fast diesel yacht are swamped by wooden boat ownership. The routine maintenance costs of a wooden boat are not excessive. When it is 50 years old some renewal costs are inevitably more than mere maintenance costs. Such as holding tank, calorifer, fridge. The cost of keel bolts can be tiny compared with attending to , say, Westerly bilge keel problems (I am not suggesting Westerly's are bad - I am merely pointing out that the cost of renewal of keel bolts were so low, I always replace the bolts even when seen and found ok.) The thing about wooden boats is a regular maintenance programme. It's a very good idea. I fancied a place in the 'shed' in the yard this winter for the first time. I declined the cost, carrying on my regular practice of all over cover. There are some significant savings with wooden boats - for example dropping the mast every winter means the standing rigging will last as twice as long, and for example all that epoxy tosh. Those savings I invest admittedly into the fabric of the boat.

    I shall never try irony or pathos ever again. (oh by the way, not only the article but the whole of the magazine was finished before taxi - and it had several mobo articles - quite useful like 'oh dear I have had to renew the hydraulics cos it is now 3 years old since new - oh dear, I've done it again. Oh dear I have glibly suggested that wooden boat ownership maintenance takes more than plastic ownership. Sorry wooden boat owners.

    The point is an article in such a notable magazine as PBO OUGHT to be objective.
    I did acknowledge that it wasn’t your point so please do keep up with the irony and pathos

    Actually, your description of the 41 as ‘diesel gobbling oil well’ was amusing — made me laugh anyway.

    I haven’t read the article but I would agree with your point about objectivity and also not making comments that aren’t based upon experience or knowledge. I guess there should be some room for opinion though

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    771

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    As another wooden boat owner, I agree with Minn’s estimate for annual costs - gone up the last two years due to marina berth but that isn’t a wooden boat issue. For me one of the chief benefits of a wooden boat is the ease with which it can be repaired and returned to a ‘good as new’ condition if you are prepared to put the work in. I make no claims to ‘showroom finish’ with my work but a few hours of sanding and painting/varnishing will produce some very satisfactory results which stand the ‘ten foot’ test. I have great respect for those who can produce even better finishes but it is usually directly proportional to effort made rather than money spent. All the technology is very basic and well within many people’s DIY capability but there is a ready supply of suitably skilled and affordable boat repairers around who will do any significant jobs that exceed DIY capability.

    For me, the key to owning a wooden boat is as Tiller Girl has suggested - keep on top of the work and it won’t cause you many problems. You don’t need your own boatyard or bottomless pockets.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Sail on the Medway, Kent from Chatham Maritime Marina
    Posts
    1,912

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    We all know that GRP and steel boats never need any maintenance. This is very apparent by the number left for months in a boatyard without the sight of any work being done. GRP is impervious to water, although some mention osmosis but no boat has sunk from osmosis. Steel boats can rust slightly, but a new plate welded over the top solves that. That proves all the maintenance on wooden boats is a major effort and costs a lot.

    Never owned a wooden yacht but have had wooden dinghies. They were easy to keep respectable with little effort.

    For liveaboards they will also find a wooden boat warmer in winter and cooler in summer. No mention of that in the PBO article.

    Of the three main materials used for yacht construction, wood will eventually rot away or can be burnt. Steel can rust but needs to be cut up for recyclng. GRP just goes to landfill when no longer wanted.

    Finally. Who does not stare in awe at a well preserved wooden boat on the water. They have classic lines and look so different to modern yachts and motorboats. So if you want to be different, get a wooden yacht.
    If my foresight was as good as my hindsight, I would be a multi-millionaire.

  4. #34
    photodog is offline Lord High Commander of Upper Broughton and Gunthorpe
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    35,450

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    Quote Originally Posted by sailorman View Post
    A lot of new ones are, built down to a price that raises profits

    put in a kitchen,bathroom, two tor three bedrooms ( none can be used at sea ) , a dining area with minimal stowage, then wrap them in thin grp to keep the water out
    Works for me.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Dawlish South Devon
    Posts
    14,538

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    Quote Originally Posted by photodog View Post
    Works for me.
    😎😏

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Greenwich
    Posts
    7,565

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    When I was a student I spent a lot of time trying to do up my father's wooden boat. He was not a practical man and did not have the boat surveyed before buying it.

    But I learnt a great deal and was able to tackle almost every job with basic tools and materials, from recaulking most of the hull to bowsprit painting, sanding back to bare wood and varnishing, canvas deck repair (learnt that copper nails are nice but will stick through the ceiling of the cabin if they are too long, but also that the ends can be hammered bent into the wood, wood filler applied, whole thing painted and good as new at first glance (and 3 years later)), and that all the odd bits of stray wood around a boat including ill fitting floorboards could actually be the doors to lockers, or the part that makes the table into a berth. Wonderful times, the boat looked a treat in our last season - by far better than any boat he or I have owned since.

    And once I started work I was very happy to leave owning a wooden boat until I retired. I will continue to be happy to be on my plastic tat out sailing and exploring looking at beautiful boats, than in their position looking at me.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,417

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    Quote Originally Posted by sailorman View Post
    A lot of new ones are, built down to a price that raises profits

    put in a kitchen,bathroom, two tor three bedrooms ( none can be used at sea ) , a dining area with minimal stowage, then wrap them in thin grp to keep the water out
    People go on about wooden boats as though they are god's gift to society.
    Well for thousands of years they were, but there is nothing about later day wooden boats that one cannot do ones' self & I for one am not on awe of the so called skills of the boat builders. In early days with minimal tools - Yes. But in modern days-- No!!
    Tucker brown of Burnham were supposed to be a traditional boat builder in wood. But when I shot blasted my last Stella down to bare wood inside & out I was amazed at the worm holes in the wood that were there at manufacture & the repairs in the planks where mistakes had been made. All hidden by paint. It was nothing special & the inside was easy to reproduce in my workshop.

    I would have no fear of building one from scratch in my working days (i was a joinery manufacturer so would have had a head start)
    All the operations were just simple pieces of construction & the work was nothing different to forming any 3 dimensional component in wood.

    As for hull shape & accommodation which people swoon about. It was just a product of the time. If designers had known how to produce the hull shape of today, I bet they would have. They just were unable to do so with the material available, or did not have the knowledge in design & the material for the rig etc.
    When Tucker Brown launched the Carter designed "Angel" Sony Cole poo pooed it as a skimming dish. He laughed the other side of his face when it started leaving the opposition behind in its wake.
    However, If one looks at a modern GRP yacht, the skill & technical design that goes into it is far better than the amateurish efforts of earlier yacht builders (Westerly comes to mind!!)
    Just because the hull is thin does not mean that it does not do its job.
    As it is often said " Any fool can design a bridge to stay up- It takes an engineer to design one to just stays up" & that is a bit like modern GRP boat construction
    The technology & quality of construction is miles better than the bloke with saw & plane in a damp shed of years ago. I could not build a modern GRP yacht.

    The reason you get 2 heads with room for a shower is because you can - simple really.
    & the boats serve the market they are built for infinitely better. Spacious, airy, comfortable, dry, warm, good cooking facilities, Excellent accommodation ( I can sleep under way).
    What is there in a wooden boat that is better? Do not tell me about deep cockpits- Just heal the boat & that lovely square side becomes a negative wall that pushes your bum to the edge of the seat unless you want to sit leaning forward all day. Then you end up with no support & backache & a pain across your shoulder blades. Shall I go on? I will not mention the endless maintenance- Well some enjoy that & fair doos to them. I can understand that. What I cannot understand is laying in a bunk whilst water drips through the deck on your head.

    The modern GRP is streets ahead of the out dated wooden yacht & a lot of them look every bit as good. Does one really think that a lumbering old gaffer is that clever? It is nostalgia, Nothing else. Great in its time but old outdated technology now. Consign them to the bin
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 04-03-19 at 19:53.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Medway
    Posts
    19,981

    Default Re: I made a serious mistake: I cannot contain myself any further

    All my dads early boats from 1950s were wood, then he went for steel.
    Most were working boats, not spare time hobby boats.My Saturday job was applying linseed oil and turpentine to spars cut from a square baulk of wood with an adze, while watching a shipwright repair and build wooden boats,then fill the things with water to tighten them up
    Watched the wood rot and the steel corrode over 55 odd years of boating.
    Learned a lot from the past and have put it to good use.Its plastic all the way.
    Last edited by oldgit; 10-03-19 at 20:51.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to