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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    34,954

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by AntarcticPilot View Post
    Why does it need a notice? It was on of the conditions of having your boat ashore at James Watt Dock Marina - the boat had to be in an approved (mostly marina provided) cradle, and ALL propping etc. had to be done by the marina. This was well known, and was on the (short) list of T&Cs that was on your berthing contract.
    Sadly, a lot of yards aren't very professional, so allow all sorts of home-made cradles to be used (rather like the one involved in the fatal accident). There's a marina near me which uses wooden props and wedges to "secure" boats for the winter. I'd only be happy with my boat in a properly-designed steel cradle.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,295

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...on/6205418.stm

    Widespread cradle failure here. Don't recall they were home made ones...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    3,523

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    The yard in France where my boat is kept uses very substantial steel props but I was told off for hoisting a sail before launching. Annoying, but that's the yard rules and I have to comply or be chucked out.
    'To lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe' (EC Treaty)

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    18,715

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Sadly, a lot of yards aren't very professional, so allow all sorts of home-made cradles to be used (rather like the one involved in the fatal accident).
    The cradle in this case was absolutely fine as long as all four props were in contact with the hull. I would expect many or most professional cradles to offer failure modes with one prop moved out of place. Anyone who drops one of four props is, frankly, an irresponsible idiot.

    There's a marina near me which uses wooden props and wedges to "secure" boats for the winter. I'd only be happy with my boat in a properly-designed steel cradle.
    I'd be fine with wooden props done (haha) properly. At least one Clyde marina uses them, but with substantial cross-racing between adjacent props and across the front and back.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,242

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    The cradle in this case was absolutely fine as long as all four props were in contact with the hull. I would expect many or most professional cradles to offer failure modes with one prop moved out of place. Anyone who drops one of four props is, frankly, an irresponsible idiot.
    Hard to disagree with that, but the practice is sadly not uncommon. Boats are often secured in cradles with additional timber supports, I am told, to prevent the development of rocking harmonics in big winds and also to beef up if the cradle’s wind limits are exceeded.

    Most marinas have a ban on touching the cradle pads, but one often sees the wooden poles being temporarily removed for antifouling. Hence the practice of painting the remaining cradle patches when the boat is lifted in slings for launching, which of course doesn’t work that well.

    The only proper solution is to shift the boat in its cradle which can cost a few hundred quid. Hence the surreptitious and dangerous pad-dropping lark.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Plymouth
    Posts
    8,198

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    The cradle in this case was absolutely fine as long as all four props were in contact with the hull. I would expect many or most professional cradles to offer failure modes with one prop moved out of place. Anyone who drops one of four props is, frankly, an irresponsible idiot.



    ....


    I have to agree; though dropping a pad is fine provided you put something useful in it's place. I sense the Health n Safety brigade warming up for an ecstasy of nannying on this one

    A bit of a storm in an egg cup really, there was nothing wrong wrong with the bloke's cradle, the chap made an error, it's very sad but crap happens. There is more chance of being hit by lightening when picking up your race winnings than a spate of these things.
    Last edited by doug748; 16-04-19 at 09:04.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    35,511

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Dropping a prop on a cradle is fine if it's done carefully.
    There are a few things which make a difference.
    1) Can the keel move?
    I've seen a few boats out of shape on their cradles after a wind, due to the keel being able to move sideways.
    2) Is there any wind?
    It doesn't take much to rock a boat on its keel.

    If your cradle is big enough and the keel is secured at the base, you can ratchet strap one side down against its supports while you work on the other side.
    If you've got a 6 -leg cradle, dropping any one leg ought to be OK.

    With a deep fin boat, some fore and aft props make a big difference in preventing the boat rocking on its keel.

    AIUI, this incident was not on a calm day?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    34,954

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by dom View Post
    Hence the practice of painting the remaining cradle patches when the boat is lifted in slings for launching, which of course doesn’t work that well.
    Antifouling the pad patches as the boat is lifted for relaunch has always worked well for me. There's no noticeable difference in fouling next time the boat's lifted out.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    3,523

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Antifouling the pad patches as the boat is lifted for relaunch has always worked well for me. There's no noticeable difference in fouling next time the boat's lifted out.
    I remember my boat being craned in once and I had none of the cheap antifouling paint I had used left to do the pad patches. A friend who was painting his boat with an expensive a/f kindly gave me some of his.

    When my boat was lifted out again there was no difference in the degree of fouling between the pad patches and the rest of the hull.
    'To lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe' (EC Treaty)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    N of Ardnamurchan, winter Loch Melfort
    Posts
    862

    Default Re: Boat falls off cradle killing owner at Weymouth

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Antifouling the pad patches as the boat is lifted for relaunch has always worked well for me. There's no noticeable difference in fouling next time the boat's lifted out.
    Same here.

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