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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,969

    Unhappy Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Apologies for the cryptic title, but I thought to post also something trivial, on top of one of the usual technical issues...
    Let's start with the latter anyway - it's a mobo forum after all, 'innit?

    Last season, I had some erratic troubles with the hydraulic flaps.
    Most of the time, they worked flawlessly. But occasionally, for no apparent reason, they didn't move one bit.
    When pressing the buttons, the electric motor always started normally with no strange noises, and each of the 4 electric valves (left/right, up/down) also worked as usually, but the pressure gauge on the pump unit was stuck to zero.
    So, it was reasonable to expect that the problem wasn't electric, but rather somewhere in the pump.
    Long story short, below is the pump body opened.


    The bad news is that according to a pump specialist, the groove which is highlighted in the pic was formed by the inner gear, possibly due to running dry, and that is enough to make the pump cavitate, without building up any pressure.
    The same chap suggested that the external body alone is not available as a spare part, hence the pump should be replaced.

    Now, aside from not understanding how and when the pump ran dry, considering that the oil level has always been close to the max, I would be curious to hear if anyone more knowledgeable than myself on these components (i.e., probably most forumites!) agree on this diagnosis.
    And if so, also any suggestion on suppliers of these things would be most welcome, since it would be silly to replace the whole controlling unit, with its motor, valves, etc. - I am attaching also a pic of it, just for reference.
    Thanks in advance for your help!


    Oh, but you might wonder why having some pasta could be such a consolation, considering also that in IT a decent pasta dish isn't exactly hard to find.
    But as it happens, yesterday a small restaurant nearby organized an evening focused on a type of pasta which we never tried before.
    So, after a day spent at the yard fiddling with flaps and other stuff, we couldn't miss it, could we?

    And it turned out to be a great discovery indeed.
    So much so, that a bit of googling revealed that just a few years ago, the thing was even covered by the BBC.
    An interesting and unusual reading, for those of you who on top of boating appreciate also VERY peculiar (but excellent!) food...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Boat- SoF
    Posts
    4,748

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    An alloy wheel repairer will fill the dent ,they weld cracks / holes etc in alloys .
    Then either hand grind it back and finish or if a bit lacking in hand eye coordination send it to machinist to finish .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Live London
    Posts
    3,447

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Quote Originally Posted by Portofino View Post
    An alloy wheel repairer will fill the dent ,they weld cracks / holes etc in alloys .
    Then either hand grind it back and finish or if a bit lacking in hand eye coordination send it to machinist to finish .
    Given it is a non critical bit of kit I would try Portos suggestion unless very difficult to remove. The post was short which helps !!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    2,092

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    MapisM, did you get a photo of the pasta? The article just describes it but if you know of some pics of the process i would be grateful. (I like making pasta)

    It's ok, I found a you tube of Paola Abraini making it
    Last edited by MrB; 11-04-19 at 22:53. Reason: googled it

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Gillingham(Dorset) Boat East Cowes
    Posts
    2,660

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    I reckon I could bore it out and put a liner in. My only concern would be if there's enough room inside the O ring seal
    Last edited by colhel; 12-04-19 at 03:54.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Volos-Athens
    Posts
    4,678

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Quote Originally Posted by MapisM View Post
    Now, aside from not understanding how and when the pump ran dry, considering that the oil level has always been close to the max, I would be curious to hear if anyone more knowledgeable than myself on these components (i.e., probably most forumites!) agree on this diagnosis.
    based on my experience with my port g/box not building up pressure for engaging the forward disks, a similar groove (if not smaller) was to blame.
    So yes, I agree with the diagnosis

    no suggestion on a solution though, first time I see a twin cylinder like that...

    cheers

    V.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Worcestershire/Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    P
    Who is the manufacturer of the pump, is it marked on the outside?
    A goodly number of such pumps are made by your countrymen (IT)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,969

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Thanks everybody, it's interesting to learn that these oil pumps can be so sensitive to wear.
    That's what I was more curious about, because I was fearing that the fault might actually be elsewhere.
    I don't think that repairing the existing body would be much more cost effective, anyhow.
    After all, in spite of the thread title, I believe/hope it's far from being a matter of another thousand, also for a new pump.

    So, I think a replacement is the way to go, though I'm still in doubt about the possible reasons for such wear.
    I'm going to replace the oil in the circuit while I am at it, but other than that, I can't see what else I could do in the future as preventative maintenance...

    Ref. the trivial part of the post, this is for Mr.B: one example of how that type of pasta can also be used to make desserts, with amazing results!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,969

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Quote Originally Posted by tico View Post
    P
    Who is the manufacturer of the pump, is it marked on the outside?
    A goodly number of such pumps are made by your countrymen (IT)
    The only recognizable stamp on the pump body says "RIVA", which obviously has nothing to see with the Aquarama builder.
    I would think that it might come from Riva Calzoni, but at the end of the day I guess it's just a matter of finding a replacement with similar specs and dimensions that can fit in the rest of the controlling unit...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Gillingham(Dorset) Boat East Cowes
    Posts
    2,660

    Default Re: Aaarumph! B.O.A.T., yet again. But at least I had some pasta...

    Your life control valves are Atos and they make pumps too.

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