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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    4,454

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    We have an F36, owned it for two years now and love it
    I like being on shafts as no outdrives to service and cheaper and easier to fix should something go wrong
    We both also enjoy the Flybridge, accessed by steps, it's a great place to sit in the sun!
    The bow thruster makes it a doddle to park, even when windy
    Took her inland to Worcester last summer and enjoyed the view from up top, we did the trip previously on our 28ft sports cruiser and could see a thing!
    See the rainbow not the rain

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Farndon
    Posts
    2,776

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by Falling Star View Post
    Thanks for that. Hadn't thought of an F33. You could be on to something there.

    Engine access looks better than an F34. Or am I missing something?
    Engine access on the F33 is good but it's a big step down. I guess a ladder could be fitted. Once in the S34 engine bay the engine access is good.
    Not sure about the F34 . The extending platform must consume some space.

    Flybridge is superior comfort . Sports cruiser pals always come to us . We are usually only invited to sports cruisers in warm weather. I am sitting in the saloon now with a good view out and heating on. Sports cruiser cave has no outlook .

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    2,726

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by MartynG View Post
    Flybridge is superior comfort . Sports cruiser pals always come to us . We are usually only invited to sports cruisers in warm weather. I am sitting in the saloon now with a good view out and heating on. Sports cruiser cave has no outlook .
    That is very true but it depends what your preference is. For us boating is all about the ‘cockpit lifestyle’ and over the years we have found that we don’t use the saloon that much. When we bought our Broom 41 it was the sportscrusier sized comfortable cockpit that swung it. We have heating outlets in the cockpit so rarely is it an uncomfortably cold temperature. The majority of our boatie socialising has been in the cockpit of our boats and hardly ever in a saloon on anyone’s boat.

    Horses for courses though - thankfully we are all different

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    598

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    We're in a similar position to the OP having sold our sailing cruiser, we're looking for a motor cruiser for offshore and continental canal use. Like the OP, we'd prefer as near as possible to one level living and plenty of cockpit space. Air draft needs to be around 3m so that rules out most flybridge cruisers (that and the steps). So far, the advice given is very helpful, but no-one's mentioned hull form. I'm assuming that with canal use and low speed pottering in mind, a semi-displacement would be preferable. We're therefore looking at the Nimbus coupe range.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    2,726

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by SimonD View Post
    We're in a similar position to the OP having sold our sailing cruiser, we're looking for a motor cruiser for offshore and continental canal use. Like the OP, we'd prefer as near as possible to one level living and plenty of cockpit space. Air draft needs to be around 3m so that rules out most flybridge cruisers (that and the steps). So far, the advice given is very helpful, but no-one's mentioned hull form. I'm assuming that with canal use and low speed pottering in mind, a semi-displacement would be preferable. We're therefore looking at the Nimbus coupe range.
    Yes, semi-displacement or displacement is probably better as it affords some protection for sterngear. Semi-displacement allows some speed at sea so if that is also a requirement probably the best way to go.

    That said, planing hulls are perfectly capable of cruising inland and many do. A bit of extra care might be required close to banks, particular with twin shafts, but otherwise no real drama. Friends took their Sealine 310 sportscruiser, with planing hull and outdrives, down through the canals to the Med. The thing is that whilst a Broom or similar is ideal inland, once you get to warmer climes a sports cruiser has its upsides. Interestingly, they dinged a prop on the way down but being outdrives they just lifted the leg and swapped it out whilst the boat was still in the water. They were miles from any boatyard and if they had shafts it would have been a major problem.

    We hope to do similar and always thought it would be a Broom or something like that but having seen what they did I am not so sure now. Maybe we will just stick with our S34
    Last edited by Greg2; 13-04-19 at 09:44.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South
    Posts
    16,465

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by MartynG View Post
    Flybridge is superior comfort . Sports cruiser pals always come to us . We are usually only invited to sports cruisers in warm weather. I am sitting in the saloon now with a good view out and heating on. Sports cruiser cave has no outlook .
    Our cave is only used at night.
    Sitting in the cockpit with the heater on and the roof up is reasonably toasty.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    West Berkshire (boat Hamble)
    Posts
    466

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Twin outdrives are nice and easy to handle. You can put the boat anywhere when you get used to them.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Thanks for the ideas. I guess we will keep looking. Never had a boat yet that wasn't a compromise!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    What about a corvette 320? They are lovely boats and each level is only a few steps rather than going up a full flight of stairs each time. Very beamy and therefore plenty of space down below.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Medway
    Posts
    19,376

    Default Re: Sealine F37, maybe

    Most flybridges have second helm downstairs, when single handed and mooring alone this is possibly the best location.
    As for the the F33, definately get all the info you can about its handling characteristics.
    The F33 and the Broom are like chalk and cheese, one is a heavy weight, comfortable sea kindly shaft drive boat that will stay where you put it when mooring under difficult conditions and will probably stay in straight line when cruising,it also does not worryingly list when changing direction.
    Wonder which one is which ?
    Last edited by oldgit; 14-04-19 at 07:39.

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