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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    44

    Default Resurrecting an angel

    How should I set about bringing this rather wonderful angel or chum back to its former glory? It is inscribed with the words: Chum Frank Gibson Gorgie Edinburgh.
    The metal is mostly iron I presume and there is a lead ingot.
    I will be able to grind off the old shackles and replace with new but how should I approach refurbishing the main parts?
    Thanks, Doraymefa.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
    Posts
    21,481

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Don't waste your time (except for an ornament at home). There is no benefit to.be derived from.weight in the rode. If there was, rope rodes would not work, which quite clearly they do. There is loads of mathematical analysis and real world observation to prove this.
    Answers to some technical queries at new website http://coxeng.co.uk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Plymouth
    Posts
    8,283

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Give it a scrub with soap and water and a pressure wash, that should do it.
    If you were to have it re-galvanized they would first pickle it in acid which can bring it up almost as new.
    The lead biscuits were designed to be added as you will, up to three I think. Yours may have been squashed a bit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    44

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    I would be very pleased simply to get some advice regarding the steps to follow to restore the metal, I have no wish to start another anchoring thread. Best regards.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Scotland.
    Posts
    13,970

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Dry scrub with a stiff plastic brush and then brush off the dust, or vacuum it off. Rub over with 3:1 or other light oil, maybe WD40. That should give it a vice patina as well as stopping it from drying out and going dusty anytime soon. Wear a dust mask when doing the scrubbing.
    "'...contradictions .... are deliberate exercises in doublethink." Orwell from 1984

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    8,276

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Quote Originally Posted by doraymefa View Post
    How should I set about bringing this rather wonderful angel or chum back to its former glory? It is inscribed with the words: Chum Frank Gibson Gorgie Edinburgh.
    The metal is mostly iron I presume and there is a lead ingot.
    I will be able to grind off the old shackles and replace with new but how should I approach refurbishing the main parts?
    Thanks, Doraymefa.
    Snap! I have one just like that but without any of the lead weights. I’m rather envious of yours!

    I was thinking of getting mine re-galvanised.
    Last edited by Minn; 23-04-19 at 20:00.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,788

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    Don't waste your time (except for an ornament at home). There is no benefit to.be derived from.weight in the rode. If there was, rope rodes would not work, which quite clearly they do. There is loads of mathematical analysis and real world observation to prove this.
    That'll be why ships don't anchor using chain, I suppose?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    3,809

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    Don't waste your time (except for an ornament at home). There is no benefit to.be derived from.weight in the rode. If there was, rope rodes would not work, which quite clearly they do. There is loads of mathematical analysis and real world observation to prove this.
    This is a view often expressed but if, as you say, there is no benefit to be derived from weight in the rode, why is it considered necessary to let out more rope when anchoring than one would chain ?
    Last edited by Poignard; 24-04-19 at 05:17.
    'To lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe' (EC Treaty)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Cyberspace
    Posts
    34,491

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    Don't waste your time (except for an ornament at home). There is no benefit to.be derived from.weight in the rode. If there was, rope rodes would not work, which quite clearly they do. There is loads of mathematical analysis and real world observation to prove this.
    An angel works by lowering the angle of the rode at the section closest to the anchor, thus improving holding. It is a viable alternative to letting out more chain, and is pretty obviously going to work up to the point where the wind strength is sufficient ot extend the chain in a straight line even with the weight of the angel on it.

    Very basic physics/trigonometry, why do you claim there is no benefit to be derived?

    - W
    Last edited by webcraft; 23-04-19 at 22:46.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,885

    Default Re: Resurrecting an angel

    Modern anchors will work satisfactorily at shorter scope compared to the older designs and have much less need for the rode to be near, or actually at, horizontal. Modern, good anchors (I'd include Rocna, Spade Supreme, Excel, Fortress, exclude Mantus and pass no comment on Boss nor Vulcan as I have insufficient experience with the latter 2), when used in the appropriate seabed and sized correctly and well set are completely buried and also bury some chain. If the anchor is too big (a possible common problem) - having it disappear is less likely. Anchors bury more deeply in softer substrates, that might be considered 'difficult' for hold. As the chain is buried it develops a reverse catenary and the angle of the shackle, not the angle of the rode at the seabed/sea interface determines the angle at which the tension is applied. The tension angle, the shackle angle, is almost independent of the rode angle at the seabed. The tension angle is dependent on depth of burial, size of rode and shackle and shear strength of the seabed. The smaller the chain, shackle, swivel etc the deeper the anchor will bury (and the higher the tension angle). The deeper the anchor buries the higher the shear strength of the seabed, which increases with the square of depth.

    There are formulae to determine the shackle angle, used by oil rig anchor companies and anyone laying commercial or Navy ship moorings. If you test anchors and have need to dig them out when the tide recedes you can measure the angle at the time.

    Scope and the focus on achieving horizontal tension is much less relevant for a modern anchor. Use of sensible snubbers also reduces the need to worry about the rode being horizontal.

    Chum or kellets can be used as a hammerlock as this will reduce yawing and a reduction in yawing will reduce the propensity of anchors to drag. However a second anchor simply hung off the bow, but dragging on the seabed, will achieve the same effect as a kellet. Personally to reduce yawing I favour deployment off a second anchor in a 'V'.

    To the OP - The ideal might be grit blasting - but that might have an unattractive cost. I would use a stainless brush on an angle grinder and then acid wash with dilute acid (as mentioned or implied above). This will reveal nice shiny metal (and it might look quite attractive - but it simply will not last (so I'd suggest you would be wasting your time) . I might have a word with Geoff at Knox Anchor and ask him if he can re-galvanise for you (as Minn suggested) - it will then look slightly less attractive than newly cleaned metal - but will last longer (and if simply used for a conversation piece - will last for your lifetime). The only way to return lead to 'as new' condition would be to make moulds ands re-cast (you might need to add some new lead as slag will develop when you melt the old lead and you will need to discard the slag, losing some lead). The lead will quickly oxidise, and look very dull, some aluminium spray paint might be an idea (and would work on bare metal if you do not fancy the galvanising option). Melting and casting lead is not difficult, camping stove, blow torch, old saucepan, welding gloves work well, you just need to be very, very careful, plan ahead and keep children and pets well away - it is not a spectator sport!

    However if you are keeping outdoors - spray, aluminium, paint will not last.

    An interesting artefact - and I think worth the effort (something to keep you busy when winter returns).

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 24-04-19 at 06:31.

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