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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,156

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Surely the "Art of Coarse Sailing" has to be in the mix? After all, it is set in Norfolk!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Henley on Thames
    Posts
    2,449

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Surely the "Art of Coarse Sailing" has to be in the mix? After all, it is set in Norfolk!

    First boating book I ever read, very funny is is too!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,778

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Michael Frost's two classics:

    "Boadicea CK 213"
    "Half a Gale"

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    5,171

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Michael Green’s other sailing book “The Art of Coarse Cruising” is nearly as funny as the Norfolk Broads one, but with a wider application for cruising sailors.
    I would like to read, but have failed to find a copy of, “Gotty goes Furrin”

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Colchester, Essex
    Posts
    4,750

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Without a doubt, all the Des Sleightholme Old Harry books, and then "SODs law of the Sea" … When I first read Magic of the Swatchways, I picked it straight back up and read it again straight over....
    Larry Botheras

    Colvic Victor 35 "Gladys"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    22,861

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    I used to read a lot of these sorts of book but less lately, however:

    Also by Alker Tripp, Shoal Waters and Fairways.

    The Voyage alone in theYawl Rob Roy by John MacGregor is from 1867. I can't remember much about it but the drawings are nice.

    Suffolk Invasion, by Frank Hussey is a very well written and illustrated account of the 1667 battle at Landguard fort.

    Ode to Joy written and illustrated by my friend Janet Harker and her late husband. It is the story of a small boat as told by the boat, and suitable for young and old.

    Tide ways and Byways Essex and Suffolk is an old-fashioned romp but with fine drawings.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    6,922

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    'A Floating Home', by Cyril Ionides and J. B. Atkins, Chatto and Windus, 1918

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    89

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    I'll give a shout out for three authors.

    James Wentworth Day - 'Rum Owd Boys' - a superb drawing of life on and around the Blackwater before and during the second war. I once met James in the King's Head in Tollesbury in his latter years (late 1970s) and he offered to write me a job reference; wish I'd taken him up on it.

    John Kemp - 'A Fair Wind for London' - John was my first boss, when I was in the barges, and this is his tale of how he came to own Thalatta, with lots of charming tales about the fisher folk of Maldon.

    Jonathan Raban - 'Coasting' - This might seem an outfield choice, as it is part autobiographical, part travelogue, and is an account of the author's attempt to become a mariner and circumnavigate England (if that's possible) in order to write about its character. He starts somewhere down south, and returns there, without mention of the Blackwater until the very end of the story, when he unfolds how entranced he was by our coast and how he later settled here.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Essex, near the R. Blackwater
    Posts
    3,578

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Then there is "The Last Sailorman" by Dick Durham
    "Living in the Backwaters" By Michael Emmett
    "Blackwater Men" by Arthur and Michael Emmett
    "The jottings of a Thames Estuary Ditch Crawler" by Nick Ardley

    And if you are allowed to come ashore in the early years of the 20th century, how about the books about the Essex Marshes by SL Bensusan? Written in the vernacular they are wittily observed accounts of life on the Dengie, the wildfowlers, fishermen, shopkeepers gentry and all. "Marshland Calling" and Marshland Echoes" are but two. All long out of print but worth tracking down secondhand.
    He said, "All men will be sailors then until the sea shall free them."

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    West Mersea
    Posts
    89

    Default Re: A Literary Thread

    Somewhere in my library I have Bensusan's 'Marshland Omnibus', but can't remember anything about it, tbh.

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