Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 75
  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Worthing West Sussex
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    thanks martyn

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Home: Bristol, Boat: Torquay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Welcome Nosealegs

    I’d echo the comments about going to see lots of boats, checking out the layouts and see what you get for your money.

    I’d suggest maybe get your family (aka crew) to do a ‘competent crew’ course to see if they like it, and get them trained in the basics. I’d go straight for Powerboat level 2, and skip level 1. Also try the RYA Helmsmen course to get a feel for twin engine boats. This will be valuable experience, and you can talk to the trainer, other people on the course, and people in marinas about their boats, and will start to get a feel for what is important to you. You should also need to do a VHF course.

    Going to Cornwall / across the channel is not a light undertaking. The boat will probably be fine – you and your crew maybe another thing. Marinas often organise group cruises – and this would be a good way to build your confidence.

    Do make sure any boat you are interested in have the Builder’s Certificate, the VAT invoice and complete trail of Bills of Sale – or make sure the price is suitably adjusted if these are not present, as you will find it harder to sell, and will get less money.

    When you’ve found a boat, hire an independent marine engineer to accompany you on the sea trial, not someone the broker offers to provide. Volvo Paul is a fave on here, but I think he specialises in diesels. If you buy petrol – you will need someone else.

    Buy a boat you can sell. This means buy one that is in good condition, is at a reasonable price, and is a brand that the UK market likes. A good litmus test for this is how many of them are around. E.g. the Uk market likes Fairline and Sealine cabin cruisers. Therefore there are lots for sale in the UK, and a tidy example will sell at the right price

    It sounds as though you are settled on an overnight cabin cruiser. In which case I would consider:

    Toilet arrangements (aka Heads) - you will almost certainly want a private toilet.
    Kitchen arrangements (aka Galley) - Do you want a small fridge and hob for cups of tea and bacon sarnies?
    Sleeping arrangements - Check out the sleeping arrangements and think about how much privacy you need.

    Do you want to anchor up? If so, I would consider getting a boat with a windlass. This is a motor for lowering, and more importantly, raising the anchor. They can be quite heavy.

    If this sounds like your kind of thing then American single engine ‘lake boats, like the Bayliner 285 might appeal. This was my first boat. They are very roomy; but they are a handful on a breezy day. We enjoyed the boat, but did have a few mishaps on windy days, and found the limited availability of petrol a pain in the area we were cruising. If you get something one you will want one with a bowthruster - this is a ‘get out of jail free card’. I would want one even on a twin engine model (but that is because I am not very good).

    In hindsight I would have spent a bit more on my first boat and bought a Sealine S28 with twin diesels instead – which would just about be in your budget. Twins are much easier to manoeuvre. Diesel is much more readily available, and get the benefit of heating & discounted fuel.

    This is an example picked at random to give an idea of the layout.. https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/2...nced%20listing

    Decisions decisions

    Good luck
    DW
    Last edited by DazzyWoo; 15-05-19 at 21:31.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Worthing West Sussex
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by DazzyWoo View Post
    Welcome Nosealegs

    I’d echo the comments about going to see lots of boats, checking out the layouts and see what you get for your money.

    I’d suggest maybe get your family (aka crew) to do a ‘competent crew’ course to see if they like it, and get them trained in the basics. I’d go straight for Powerboat level 2, and skip level 1. Also try the RYA Helmsmen course to get a feel for twin engine boats. This will be valuable experience, and you can talk to the trainer, other people on the course, and people in marinas about their boats, and will start to get a feel for what is important to you. You should also need to do a VHF course.

    Going to Cornwall / across the channel is not a light undertaking. The boat will probably be fine – you and your crew maybe another thing. Marinas often organise group cruises – and this would be a good way to build your confidence.

    Do make sure any boat you are interested in have the Builder’s Certificate, the VAT invoice and complete trail of Bills of Sale – or make sure the price is suitably adjusted if these are not present, as you will find it harder to sell, and will get less money.

    When you’ve found a boat, hire an independent marine engineer to accompany you on the sea trial, not someone the broker offers to provide. Volvo Paul is a fave on here, but I think he specialises in diesels. If you buy petrol – you will need someone else.

    Buy a boat you can sell. This means buy one that is in good condition, is at a reasonable price, and is a brand that the UK market likes. A good litmus test for this is how many of them are around. E.g. the Uk market likes Fairline and Sealine cabin cruisers. Therefore there are lots for sale in the UK, and a tidy example will sell at the right price

    It sounds as though you are settled on an overnight cabin cruiser. In which case I would consider:

    Toilet arrangements (aka Heads) - you will almost certainly want a private toilet.
    Kitchen arrangements (aka Galley) - Do you want a small fridge and hob for cups of tea and bacon sarnies?
    Sleeping arrangements - Check out the sleeping arrangements and think about how much privacy you need.

    Do you want to anchor up? If so, I would consider getting a boat with a windlass. This is a motor for lowering, and more importantly, raising the anchor. They can be quite heavy.

    If this sounds like your kind of thing then American single engine ‘lake boats, like the Bayliner 285 might appeal. This was my first boat. They are very roomy; but they are a handful on a breezy day. We enjoyed the boat, but did have a few mishaps on windy days, and found the limited availability of petrol a pain in the area we were cruising. If you get something one you will want one with a bowthruster - this is a ‘get out of jail free card’. I would want one even on a twin engine model (but that is because I am not very good).

    In hindsight I would have spent a bit more on my first boat and bought a Sealine S28 with twin diesels instead – which would just about be in your budget. Twins are much easier to manoeuvre. Diesel is much more readily available, and get the benefit of heating & discounted fuel.

    This is an example picked at random to give an idea of the layout.. https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/2...nced%20listing

    Decisions decisions

    Good luck
    DW
    Thank you so much for all that helpful advice. I didn't know what a 'head' was. I was going to ask but felt an idiot. Ive susses the gallery, and didn't know what the windlass was either. Thankyou!!!1. That boat is gorgeous, absolutely, I think ive decided not to tow, so one that size would be fine, and I would go upto around 50k. Im going to spend all of this year doing courses, and trying to find out as much information as I can, so I don't make the wrong decisions. Going out in a group I would really love that .And knowing that others were closeby would be so reassuring, I think that would definatley be the way to go. Do you keep your boat in water all the time? Do people generally keep larger boats in the water all the time? With the boat being a twin diesel does that mean it uses twice as much fuel?

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Home: Bristol, Boat: Torquay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosealegsyet View Post
    Do you keep your boat in water all the time?
    I've just sold mine I started off in a dry stack, then decided I was better off in a marina. I kept boat afloat most of year - with a haul out for annual service

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosealegsyet View Post
    Do people generally keep larger boats in the water all the time?
    . Many do, many opt for winter ashore (on the hard).

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosealegsyet View Post
    With the boat being a twin diesel does that mean it uses twice as much fuel?
    I'm not an expert but I don't think its quite that simple. E.g. you are getting twice the power - so would a better question be how much more fuel would it use than an engine twice the size? see http://www.ybw.com/forums/archive/in.../t-400035.html

    Honestly - the fuel costs wont break the bank on a boat that size. Check out marina fees - they will exceed the fuel bill by a margin. It will mean twice the servicing costs.

    DW

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    home Brum, boat Costa Brava
    Posts
    3,894

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosealegsyet View Post
    DAvid what do you mean by had it craned?
    I mean I had it lifted in and out by a crane. Not cheap around Ä100 each lift.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Farndon
    Posts
    2,806

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    I wouldn't have a Bayliner nor any American boat with through the window access to the bow and electric only cooking.
    Also only consider diesel engined boats if you have ambitions to travel far.
    I think we made a good choice with the S23 as a first boat.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Worthing West Sussex
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    got it! doh!

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Worthing West Sussex
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by MartynG View Post
    I wouldn't have a Bayliner nor any American boat with through the window access to the bow and electric only cooking.
    Also only consider diesel engined boats if you have ambitions to travel far.
    I think we made a good choice with the S23 as a first boat.
    Yes i think ive decided on diesel, so are you saying all american boats will only have the option for electric cooking? As opposed to what? .I saw some that said alcholol? What does that mean?What do you mean by through the window access to the bow.Is this the window that is on the front of the boat? Whats bad about that?Sorry for all the questions, as you can see i know very little.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    House - Teesside, Boat - Windermere!
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    We started out boating on a Sealine S24. Perfect to learn the ropes so to speak. Drawbacks were petrol, single engine handling and a bit tippy/unstable when getting on and off.

    Moved on to a Sealine S28. A far better boat and if you have £50K in your budget you will get a very nice one. They are well built, spacious and can be used to just sit and relax around the marina as much as putting to sea. The S28 will give for a better ride at sea than a smaller S23/24/25 etc. if the weather turns.

    Our old one is up for sale with NYA and I can vouch that she is in immaculate condition: https://www.nya.co.uk/boats-for-sale/sealine-s28-14/

    You will need to keep a boat this size in a marina, lift out once a year for a quick underwater scrub and service of outdrives (most people I know do those every other year). Other than that it will be in your berth and ready to go when you are.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    9,565

    Default Re: Total newbie looking for tons of advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nosealegsyet View Post
    Are slipways very different Lisa? Ive only seen one lol! and that's the one at Littlehampton, and I would say thatit's is massive. However nothing to compare it too. Is the size of a slipway going to determine what size boat I can purchase? Where would I know where to find all the slipways whilst I havnt got a boat, so I could check them out ? Is there a slipway directory or something? sorry for all the questions, and thanks for responding
    I meant various locations of slipway lol. Canít advise you on using slipways iím afraid as we drystack.
    L

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to