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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Clyde
    Posts
    936

    Default Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    I have 10mm dyneema halyard on my mainsail. This is slipping in the clutch when fully hoisted and tensioned so been looking up ways to cure this. Seems there are 2 options, thicken the core locally to the full hoist position, or fit external braid sleeve. For either option, where can I buy the additional core or external braid?

    For those who have done this, thoughts on which way is better?

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Lorient, just back from a second round Atlantic trip
    Posts
    3,512

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    If you go the external sleeve way, be sure to use technora braid, not dyneema which is a lot, lot more slippery
    oh no, yet another sailing blog
    http://sybrancaleone.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    11,516

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    I have a similar problem with a clutch on the main halyard. I think the easiest fix is to add a horn cleat after the clutch to wrap the halyard around. Alternatively some people have an additional clutch in series. (more expensive fix). I don't think an additional coat on the halyard will work out very well. (get fouled up) ol'will

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,974

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    Common problem, if the winch is spare - then leave the halyard on the winch, we do that with one of our halyards. Introduce a cheap 'V' cleat, or a cam cleat, and located above the clutch, its then a belt and braces solution - we have done this for a spinnaker halyard (as it allows a very quick drop - if you want). If you follow this route - we have found that the cleat positioned slightly out of line is useful - you need to consciously push the halyard into the cleat but the halyard does not lock into it 'accidentally' (when you are reefing or dropping at the end of the day). So - tension halyard, lock clutch, push halyard into 'V' clutch, release tension on winch - while holding halyard into 'V'. To release you need to re-tension the halyard to release the rope in the 'V' cleat - or be quite strong - depends how much tension the halyard was under. Cam cleats are a quicker and easier release - good for spinnaker

    Putting a sleeve on will work (we have done this to manage abrasion - but you will need to sew the outer braid on and it might not fit into the clutch, as its now too big. It can be difficult to work the new outer braid onto the halyard - ideally you want it to be a good fit, being a good fit its too tight to work. Finding a cover is easy - simply strip 300mm from an appropriately sized bit of rope. For abrasion we used a dyneema sleeve (Nautilus Braids, NZ), which will not work (as mentioned) for your application as it is too slippery.

    As William mentions - add a horn cleat - it takes time to release and any slippage will still develop due to tightening of the turns. We do this for lazy jacks and topping lift - but their tension is not critical.

    Most rope makers supply braided sleeve or hollow tape

    Best is leave on the winch - but that is unrealistic in most applications. I'd go the cheap 'V' clutch route for a main halyard (we have used plastic recently and aluminium prior). Cam cleat for spin, horn cleat - where tension does not matter - and a new clutch if you are awash with cash You might need to add reinforcing under a 'V' cleat (if it is deck mounted) - it will take a lot of load.

    Finally - if the problem is the clutch. The main clutch gets all the use (and wear). Consider swapping it for a similarly sized clutch that sees (or will have seen) less use (spin clutch, reefing clutches, 3rd reef) - its an easy and cheap fix - if its possible and works.

    There are so many ways to skin a rabbit!

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 19-05-19 at 01:18.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Deale, MD, USA
    Posts
    1,638

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    Another option is to coat with Spinlock RP29. It will increase friction a good bit. This is one of its recommended uses.

    Personally, I'd splice on a cover if there is room. It's easy. In general, stripping the cover from an inexpensive PDB or Technora remnant is cheaper than buying the cover from a specialty source... And I bet they are just re-selling covers they stripped from tapering halyards and sheets, a service they charge for!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,028

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    First see if you have the right sized pieces in the clutch ( assuming spinnlock) these can easily be replaced with new ones to suit your rope size.
    Another option is to mark the clutch point on the rope & then, with a D splicer draw some lengths of thick wipping twine down inside the outer covering to increase the thickness of the halyard. Do about 4 strands at a time & it will not take long to get quite an increase in size
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    36,209

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    First see if you have the right sized pieces in the clutch ( assuming spinnlock) these can easily be replaced with new ones to suit your rope size.
    Another option is to mark the clutch point on the rope & then, with a D splicer draw some lengths of thick wipping twine down inside the outer covering to increase the thickness of the halyard. Do about 4 strands at a time & it will not take long to get quite an increase in size
    This ^.
    You can go further and stitch through the rope. This can have the benefit of preventing the core moving in the outer.
    The correct clutch is the best answer, but can be ££££.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,974

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    Minor (maybe) query - where did you source the dyneema?

    Jonathan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,342

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    I had this problem when I replaced my main halyard last year. I changed the cam and base plate on the clutch (Spinlock), which were twenty years old and visibly worn, and have had no further issues.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Clyde
    Posts
    936

    Default Re: Thickening dyneema rope to prevent clutch slipping

    Thanks all

    The winch serves 5 lines including main outhaul and kicker, so horn cleat after the winch is a no go.
    Cam cleat could be an idea - will need to check if there is room. But would rather get the existing setup to work! Will check the existing jammer cam size, but fairly sure it is right size

    The halyard came with the boat. Boat new in 2012, but little used til I bought her in 2018.

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