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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,434

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    This is useful;


  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
    Posts
    21,567

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Quote Originally Posted by CAPTAIN FANTASTIC View Post
    This is useful;

    15 minutes! Sorry, watched 1 of them, learned nothing and gave up.
    Answers to some technical queries at new website http://coxeng.co.uk

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Boat: Falmouth. Work: Cambridge
    Posts
    1,334

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    I pay no attention at all to the join when using the windlass: the transition is completely smooth and the gypsy grips the rope just as well as the chain. I simply don't have to worry about it. In start contrast to the previous splice between 8-plait and the chain which was stiff (and rotted the chain) and always jammed up in the hawse pipe or gypsy.

    I think the big difference is to use thin enough rope (it's easily strong enough) and to use a splice which causes little extra thickness - as I suggested.
    Last edited by jdc; 20-05-19 at 21:08.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Thanks folks, I took a photo of the windlass teeth (it's an Aries Quick but I couldn't see any obvious markings on the gypsy itself). And I can't work out how to post the photo so that's another bit of advice required!!

    Agree polyester not floating line, my mistake

    Cost-wise I was looking at this in 16mm.
    Just under half the price from Mr Green. Stated breaking strain is the same at 5000kg. £130 saving is worth giving some thought to, surely? Any reason not to?

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F272717451162

    Anyway, given its quite a big ticket item, I might buy or borrow a couple of metres to see if the windlass likes it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,974

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    15 minutes! Sorry, watched 1 of them, learned nothing and gave up.
    +1

    I din't even bother looking (though not strongly motivated) - but a very common problem in most sailing vids. My attention span is that of a 16 year old.

    Interestingly cooking videos, or some of them, are very short and get to the salient points immediately. There might be a lesson in there.

    Jonathan

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    4,974

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Quote Originally Posted by Robih View Post
    I had the same conundrum and laboured to splice anchorplait on to our 10mm chain. It wasn’t the right solution of course as the chain to rope joint is unmanageable through the winch/deck/chain locker. So we swapped out the 10mm chain for uprated 8mm and had a much longer chain, with greater strength but only a small additional weight penalty. It’s expensive but it’s the way to go, the proper fix that you’ll be pleased you did.
    +1

    We went from 50m of 8mm to 75m of 6mm - its all positive. There are, very sadly, some cost implications - considerably larger than the cost of a bit of nylon. New gypsies are extortionate, new windlass more so and of course there is the cost of the chain - none of which are minor amounts. But, if you are motivated, its one solution. The best time to consider downsizing chain is when you 'order' a new yacht (when you might actually save money - you will save power), when you need a new windlass or when you need a new chain.

    Our spare, or second rode, is mixed, 40m of nylon and 15m of chain, same 6mm. The rope is neatly coiled round the inside perimeter of a milk crate and the chain sits in the resultant empty space in the middle - it all gets a good fresh water wash when ever possible and sits on the foredeck in the sun to dry. The milk crate keeps it all aired and allows everything to dry..

    The OP might like to consider an extra length of chain and a 'C' link - for long distance cruising the extra chain would be the better bet - though 10mm chain is very, very, heavy - and I'd look seriously at the downsizing option (depends on the impact of weight on the yacht - and the priority for funds).

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 20-05-19 at 22:47.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    173

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Rota Marine sound like a decent company, you could always ask if anybody has dealt with them before. The only thing I would say against that particular rope is that splicing Multiplait can be a bit of a challenge if it is you have not done it before.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    I did this last year using a “chain/warp” splice.

    https://www.bluemoment.com/pix/warpchain4.jpg

    8mm chain to 16mm three strand leaded warp as used by commercial fishermen. Advantage over a back splice is that it does not add much additional width and therefore runs directly through the windlass and down the hawse pipe. Tested in a force 6 overnight last year and all held well.

    Works a treat on my Anchorman vertical manual windlass. I think that the vertical windlass helps because the 180 degree turn to the hawse pipe means that the warp is gripped better in the windlass teeth. Example below off a different boat but same set up:

    http://geminicats.com/images/IMG_0371.jpg
    Last edited by Dutch01527; 21-05-19 at 06:53.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    8,627

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Don't agree with the comment about splicing with only two strands it's wrong, I use two strands one way and the third strand backwards through the same link then a tapered long splice. Two strands only reduces the strength by a third.
    Quote Originally Posted by jdc View Post
    I had exactly this same conversation with a representative from English Braids. He recommended:

    1. 3-strand not 8-plait as the windlass is probably designed for that
    2. use polyester not nylon. This is because stretch is actually bad for chafe and nylon hardens in a very short time whereas polyester is still good after a decade
    3. On no account to use floating rope like polypropylene as you'll inevitably get caught up in it somehow

    I add my own 4th point which is to use the correct splice. It's not a back-splice but rather more elegant. Look at the rigging handbook by Brion Toss: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rigging-Han...dp_ob_title_bk

    You pass only two of the three strands through the last link of the chain. This is just as strong because the load is shared between 4 strands, but is much less lumpy than a conventional back-splice. In tests it performs at about 97% of the full BS of the rope.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ammersee, Bavaria
    Posts
    4,647

    Default Re: Adding anchor warp to existing chain

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostlymoron View Post
    Don't agree with the comment about splicing with only two strands it's wrong, I use two strands one way and the third strand backwards through the same link then a tapered long splice. Two strands only reduces the strength by a third.


    If the string in the picture has a breaking strain of 50lb you can still use it to lift 150lb if it is trippled up .... any single strand still has a breaking strain of 50lb.

    With a 3-strand splice on a link, with all 3 strands used you have doubled up to 6 strands on the link itself, so the attachment at the link is stronger than the rope - even though the double-back on the link weakens the strands (and why for a really strong splice you would use a thimble.)

    Because it is a splice, it tapers back to 3 strands of the original rope - the 3 strand rope remains the weakest link, not the splice.

    If you only use 2 strands, then that is doubled up to 4 in the splice so it is still pretty much as strong as the rope itself which is only 3 strand. With the doubled-back strands weakened, it appears to be 97% as strong as the original rope - which is close enough to be considered workable.

    That is the theory behind the 2-strand claim, I don't particularly like it and used all 3 strands on my splice, but it appears correct.

    Perhaps someone more knowledgable can provide clarification.
    Last edited by Baggywrinkle; 21-05-19 at 07:51.
    The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.

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