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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Hamble
    Posts
    1,025

    Default Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    See here

    As of this time, the link to the order details result in a "file not found" error.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    31

    Default Govt announce Marine Conservation zones


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Poole, Dorset
    Posts
    930

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    The link works now it would seem.
    Having looked through the documents it seems that designation is one thing, can't see any rules or restrictions at this stage though.
    Is it that now designated, other parties, as listed in the designation order get to apply rules as they see fit to comply?
    This has been bubbling for some time with talk of anchoring restrictions being the main fear for boat owners, however, I wonder who by and how any such restriction, if it happens, would get enforced considering that boats are not registered and the people on board don't have to carry ID.
    100's turn up there on a good summer weekend.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7,148

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    Anchoring is going to be restricted there it’s a foregone conclusion.
    It’s about people having something for free. You don’t pay tax on free anchoring do you. What with big brother governments taking is into 1984.
    Follow the money.
    Sport fishermen have been restricted in catching Bass for conservation purposes only to increase the quota allowable to commercial fisherman by I believe 1/2ton a day.
    You don’t pay tax on free activities.
    Follow the money

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Poole
    Posts
    479

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    I think the failure of the arguments against designation of Studland as an MCZ has been another unintended consequence of Brexit:

    Firstly, 2700 civil servants (2/3 of the DEFRA staff) have been transferred to Brexit related duties, meaning that the latest tranche of MCZs have probably been nodded through by the work experience lad; and secondly Michael Gove’s is now in a leadership challenge so he is only interested in his legacy as Secretary of State. He would not want to pick a fight with conservationists, no matter how poor the science backing the proposals.

    It now will be interesting to see how quickly a local management group will be set up, who becomes the dominant voice on this and how any control measures will be decided upon.
    Last edited by GrahamD; 31-05-19 at 10:39.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Gillingham(Dorset) Boat East Cowes
    Posts
    2,676

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneR View Post
    See here

    As of this time, the link to the order details result in a "file not found" error.
    Just on case you haven't spotted it, there's a link at the bottom of the 3 rd PDF to a 136 page document. Possible scenarios but nothing concrete that I can see, but Ive only skimmed through it.... at work

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Ruislip
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    Quote Originally Posted by dpb View Post
    This has been bubbling for some time with talk of anchoring restrictions being the main fear for boat owners, however, I wonder who by and how any such restriction, if it happens, would get enforced considering that boats are not registered and the people on board don't have to carry ID.
    100's turn up there on a good summer weekend.
    There’s a useful outline on which organisation applies management measures (including controls and restrictions) at https://assets.publishing.service.go...d-bay-2019.pdf
    For controls on inshore fisheries, eg banning scallop dredging or beam trawling, it’s the local IFCA (Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority). For offshore fisheries, it’s the Marine Management Organisation, MMO.

    We have always understood that management measures for recreational boating will be implemented by the MMO, with whom BORG, the Boat Owners’ Response Group, have had useful discussions in the past. They have the power to impose local bye laws. However the list of regulators at the above link does not mention recreational boating at all – but I presume it will remain the MMO who will be the regulator.

    The document states “Regulators will manage each site according to the features and activities in, or near, a specific area. Management measures will be implemented at sites most at risk of damage first, regulating only those activities which have a detrimental impact on the designated features. Any management measures that are required for MCZs will be applied on a case-by-case basis.” My view is that any damage arising from recreational boating is slight compared with devastation of the seabed caused by scallop dredging and other heavy bottom fishing gear, and hopefully the effects of our little (in the scale of things) anchors will figure low down on the list of priorities. I am not aware of any restrictions being imposed on recreational boating in any MCZ yet, but please correct me if this is wrong.

    Management measures could range from simply monitoring the health and extent of the eelgrass in Studland Bay, with the possibility of intervening if it is deteriorating, to prohibiting anchoring in part or all of the eelgrass areas. Extra (environmentally friendly) mooring buoys have been suggested, but there are questions to be answered and also cost issues with that.

    Might I suggest a possible way of reducing the disturbance caused by an anchor – this is speculation and would require verifying – which is to change the way we retrieve anchors in sensitive areas. The setting of an anchor in the seabed probably only causes slight disturbance as the anchor blade slides down into the sediment. Provided the anchor does not drag, the main disturbance is caused by conventional retrieval, when the blade is pivoted upwards by a vertical pull on the end of the shank. This will push the sediment upward and sideways. If instead the anchor is broken out by pulling on a tripping line attached to the crown of the anchor, it should slide out almost in the reverse of the way in which it was dug in, with much less lifting and moving of the sediment, leaving a substantially smaller “scar”.

    If anyone with an underwater camera, a GoPro or whatever, could photograph or film the effects on a sandy seabed of the two methods of retrieval, this could be really useful to the boating community. Since I am normally sailing single handed, it is difficult to do this myself – ideally you want three people, one on the anchor, one steering the boat, and one in the water or a dinghy with the camera.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Gillingham(Dorset) Boat East Cowes
    Posts
    2,676

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    These are the documents I referred to earlier. Still lots of maybe's and possibles in the language.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/consul...ations#history

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    The Known Universe
    Posts
    1,073

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    Quote Originally Posted by MarlynSpyke View Post
    There’s a useful outline on which organisation applies management measures (including controls and restrictions) at https://assets.publishing.service.go...d-bay-2019.pdf
    For controls on inshore fisheries, eg banning scallop dredging or beam trawling, it’s the local IFCA (Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority). For offshore fisheries, it’s the Marine Management Organisation, MMO.

    We have always understood that management measures for recreational boating will be implemented by the MMO, with whom BORG, the Boat Owners’ Response Group, have had useful discussions in the past. They have the power to impose local bye laws. However the list of regulators at the above link does not mention recreational boating at all – but I presume it will remain the MMO who will be the regulator.

    The document states “Regulators will manage each site according to the features and activities in, or near, a specific area. Management measures will be implemented at sites most at risk of damage first, regulating only those activities which have a detrimental impact on the designated features. Any management measures that are required for MCZs will be applied on a case-by-case basis.” My view is that any damage arising from recreational boating is slight compared with devastation of the seabed caused by scallop dredging and other heavy bottom fishing gear, and hopefully the effects of our little (in the scale of things) anchors will figure low down on the list of priorities. I am not aware of any restrictions being imposed on recreational boating in any MCZ yet, but please correct me if this is wrong.

    Management measures could range from simply monitoring the health and extent of the eelgrass in Studland Bay, with the possibility of intervening if it is deteriorating, to prohibiting anchoring in part or all of the eelgrass areas. Extra (environmentally friendly) mooring buoys have been suggested, but there are questions to be answered and also cost issues with that.

    Might I suggest a possible way of reducing the disturbance caused by an anchor – this is speculation and would require verifying – which is to change the way we retrieve anchors in sensitive areas. The setting of an anchor in the seabed probably only causes slight disturbance as the anchor blade slides down into the sediment. Provided the anchor does not drag, the main disturbance is caused by conventional retrieval, when the blade is pivoted upwards by a vertical pull on the end of the shank. This will push the sediment upward and sideways. If instead the anchor is broken out by pulling on a tripping line attached to the crown of the anchor, it should slide out almost in the reverse of the way in which it was dug in, with much less lifting and moving of the sediment, leaving a substantially smaller “scar”.

    If anyone with an underwater camera, a GoPro or whatever, could photograph or film the effects on a sandy seabed of the two methods of retrieval, this could be really useful to the boating community. Since I am normally sailing single handed, it is difficult to do this myself – ideally you want three people, one on the anchor, one steering the boat, and one in the water or a dinghy with the camera.
    A very concise post and very helpful to all that use this Bay , If I can be so bold before I get the usual grief , the policy of MCZ s in Scotland is not to prohibit anchoring , but to look at no take zones and the wider use of Dredging the sea bed killing of everything on that trawl
    I would presume this would also be implemented in SB which would allow monitoring and real science to take presedence
    Anchoring will always do some damage ot the seafloor it is as always trying to minimise our impact of the sea bed , we all stick to paths when walking , pick up our litter , recycle were we can , try not to pollute rivers and fresh water lakes , but when it comes to our oceans I feel we still do not do enough , including myself a boat owner , so if there is more ways to minimise our foot print the better I say .
    Flying birds have no master

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    36,659

    Default Re: Studland Bay designated a MCZ

    I have long thought of Studland as some kind of reserved habitat for unpleasant people from Bournemouth.
    It's not even particularly nice when it's empty.

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